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Notice of Nondiscrimination

Smith College is committed to main tain ing a diverse community in an at mo sphere of mutual respect and ap pre ci a tion of differences. Smith College does not discriminate in its educational and employment policies on the bases of race, color, creed, re li gion, national/ethnic origin, sex, sexual orientation, age, or with regard to the bases outlined in the Veterans Re ad just ment Act and the Americans with Dis abil i ties Act. Smith’s admission policies and prac tic es are guided by the same principle, concerning women applying to the undergraduate program and all ap pli cants to the graduate programs. For more information, please contact the Offi ce of In sti tu tion al Diversity, (413) 585-2141.

Smith College Northampton, Massachusetts 01063(413) 584-2700

SMITH COLLEGE BULLETIN

(USPS 499-020) Series 100 September 2007 Number III

Printed monthly during January, April, September (two is sues). Of fi ce of College Relations, Garrison Hall, Smith College, Northampton, Massachu-setts 01063. Periodical postage paid at Northampton, Massachusetts. Postmaster: send address changes to Smith College, Northampton, Mas sa chu setts, 01063

All announcements herein are subject to revision. Changes in the list of Offi cers of Administration and Instruction may be made subsequent to the date of publication.

The course listings on pp. 67–427 are maintained by the Of fi ce of the Provost/Dean of the Faculty. For current in for ma tion on cours es offered at Smith, visit www.smith.edu/catalogue.

13M3862-8/07

Campus Security Act Report

The annual Campus Security Act Report contains information regarding campus security and personal safety on the Smith College campus, educational programs available and certain crime statistics from the previous three years. Copies of the annual Campus Security Act Report are available from the Department of Public Safety, Neilson Library B/South, Smith College, Northampton, Massachusetts 01063. Please direct all questions regarding these matters to Paul Ominsky, director of public safety, at (413) 585-2490.

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S M I T H C O L L E G E B U L L E T I N

2 0 0 7 -0 8 C A T A L O G U E

Smith CollegeNorthampton, Massachusetts 01063

(413) 584-2700

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How to Get to Smith ...................................................................................................................................................... ivInquiries and Visits ........................................................................................................................................................ vAcademic Calendar ....................................................................................................................................................... viThe Mission of Smith College ....................................................................................................................................... 1History of Smith College .................................................................................................................................................1The Academic Program .................................................................................................................................................7 Smith: A Liberal Arts College .......................................................................................................................................7 The Curriculum ...........................................................................................................................................................7 The Major .....................................................................................................................................................................9 The Minor .....................................................................................................................................................................9 Student-Designed Interdepartmental Majors and Minors .......................................................................................10 Five College Certifi cate Programs .............................................................................................................................10 Advising ......................................................................................................................................................................10 Academic Honor System ............................................................................................................................................11 Special Programs .......................................................................................................................................................11 Accelerated Course Program ...............................................................................................................................11 The Ada Comstock Scholars Program ................................................................................................................12 Community Auditing: Nonmatriculated Students .............................................................................................12 Five College Interchange .....................................................................................................................................12 Departmental Honors Program ..........................................................................................................................12 Independent Study Projects/Internships ............................................................................................................13 Smith Scholars Program .....................................................................................................................................13 Study Abroad Programs .............................................................................................................................................13 Smith College Junior Year Abroad Programs .....................................................................................................14 Smith Consortial and Approved Study Abroad ...................................................................................................15 Off-Campus Study Programs in the U.S. ..................................................................................................................16The Campus and Campus Life .....................................................................................................................................17 Facilities .....................................................................................................................................................................17 Student Residence Houses .........................................................................................................................................21 Intercollegiate Athletics, Intramurals and Club Sports............................................................................................21 Career Development ...................................................................................................................................................22 Health Services ...........................................................................................................................................................22 Religious Expression..................................................................................................................................................23The Student Body ..........................................................................................................................................................24 Summary of Enrollment ...........................................................................................................................................24 Geographical Distribution of Students by Residence ...............................................................................................25 Majors .........................................................................................................................................................................26Recognition for Academic Achievement ...................................................................................................................27 Prizes and Awards ....................................................................................................................................................28 Fellowships ................................................................................................................................................................32Fees, Expenses and Financial Aid ...............................................................................................................................33 Your Student Account ................................................................................................................................................33 Fees .............................................................................................................................................................................34 Institutional Refund Policy .......................................................................................................................................35 Contractual Limitations ............................................................................................................................................36 Payment Plans and Loan Options ............................................................................................................................36 Financial Aid ..............................................................................................................................................................36Admission .......................................................................................................................................................................41 Secondary School Preparation ..................................................................................................................................41 Entrance Tests ............................................................................................................................................................41 Applying for Admission ..............................................................................................................................................42 Advanced Placement ..................................................................................................................................................42 International Baccalaureate .....................................................................................................................................42 Interview .....................................................................................................................................................................42

Contents

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ii Contents

Deferred Entrance ......................................................................................................................................................42 Deferred Entrance for Medical Reasons ....................................................................................................................43 Transfer Admission ....................................................................................................................................................43 International Students ...............................................................................................................................................43 Visiting Year Programs ..............................................................................................................................................43 Readmission ...............................................................................................................................................................43 Ada Comstock Scholars Program ..............................................................................................................................43Academic Rules and Procedures ................................................................................................................................45 Requirements for the Degree .....................................................................................................................................45 Academic Credit .........................................................................................................................................................48 Academic Standing ....................................................................................................................................................51 The Age of Majority ....................................................................................................................................................52 Leaves, Withdrawal and Readmission ......................................................................................................................52Graduate and Special Programs .................................................................................................................................54 Admission ...................................................................................................................................................................54 Residence Requirements ...........................................................................................................................................54 Leaves of Absence .......................................................................................................................................................55 Degree Programs ........................................................................................................................................................55 Nondegree Studies ......................................................................................................................................................57 Housing and Health Services .....................................................................................................................................58 Finances .....................................................................................................................................................................58 Financial Assistance ..................................................................................................................................................60 Changes in Course Registration ................................................................................................................................59 Policy Regarding Completion of Required Course Work .........................................................................................60Courses of Study ............................................................................................................................................................61

Deciphering Course Listings ......................................................................................................................................63African Studies ...........................................................................................................................................................67Afro-American Studies ...............................................................................................................................................69American Ethnicities..................................................................................................................................................73American Studies .......................................................................................................................................................76Ancient Studies ...........................................................................................................................................................81Anthropology ..............................................................................................................................................................82Archaeology ................................................................................................................................................................89Art ..............................................................................................................................................................................91Astronomy ................................................................................................................................................................103Biochemistry ............................................................................................................................................................108Biological Sciences ..................................................................................................................................................114Chemistry .................................................................................................................................................................129Classical Languages and Literatures .......................................................................................................................134Comparative Literature ............................................................................................................................................138Computer Science ....................................................................................................................................................145Dance ........................................................................................................................................................................152East Asian Languages and Literatures ....................................................................................................................162East Asian Studies ....................................................................................................................................................168Economics ................................................................................................................................................................173Education and Child Study .....................................................................................................................................180Engineering ..............................................................................................................................................................189English Language and Literature ...........................................................................................................................196Environmental Science and Policy .........................................................................................................................208Ethics ........................................................................................................................................................................211Exercise and Sport Studies .......................................................................................................................................212Film Studies .............................................................................................................................................................221First-Year Seminars ..................................................................................................................................................225Foreign Language Literature Courses in Translation ............................................................................................230French Studies ..........................................................................................................................................................231Geology .....................................................................................................................................................................239German Studies ........................................................................................................................................................244

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Contents iii

Government..............................................................................................................................................................249History .......................................................................................................................................................................260Program in the History of Science and Technology ...............................................................................................270International Relations ...........................................................................................................................................272Interterm Courses Offered for Credit .......................................................................................................................274Italian Language and Literature .............................................................................................................................275Jewish Studies ...........................................................................................................................................................280Landscape Studies ....................................................................................................................................................286Latin American and Latino/a Studies .....................................................................................................................289Linguistics ................................................................................................................................................................293Logic .........................................................................................................................................................................295Marine Science and Policy ......................................................................................................................................297Mathematics and Statistics ......................................................................................................................................299Medieval Studies ......................................................................................................................................................307Middle East Studies Minor .......................................................................................................................................309Music ........................................................................................................................................................................311Neuroscience ............................................................................................................................................................318Philosophy ................................................................................................................................................................323Physics ......................................................................................................................................................................329Political Economy ....................................................................................................................................................333Psychology ................................................................................................................................................................334Public Policy ............................................................................................................................................................343Quantitative Courses for Beginning Students .........................................................................................................346Religion ....................................................................................................................................................................352Russian Language and Literature ...........................................................................................................................359Science Courses for Beginning Students .................................................................................................................362Sociology ..................................................................................................................................................................363Spanish and Portuguese ..........................................................................................................................................368Statistics ....................................................................................................................................................................376Theatre .....................................................................................................................................................................377Third World Development Studies ..........................................................................................................................383Urban Studies ...........................................................................................................................................................385Study of Women and Gender ...................................................................................................................................386Interdepartmental and Extradepartmental Course Offerings ................................................................................396Five College Course Offerings by Five College Faculty ...........................................................................................399Five College Certifi cate in African Studies ..............................................................................................................410Five College Certifi cate in Asian/Pacifi c/American Studies ...................................................................................411Five College Buddhist Studies Certifi cate Program ................................................................................................413Five College Coastal and Marine Sciences Certifi cate Program ............................................................................414Five College Certifi cate in Cognitive Neuroscience ................................................................................................415Five College Certifi cate in Culture, Health and Science .........................................................................................416Five College Certifi cate in International Relations ................................................................................................417Five College Certifi cate in Latin American Studies ................................................................................................418Five College Certifi cate in Logic ..............................................................................................................................419Five College Certifi cate in Middle East Studies .......................................................................................................421Five College Certifi cate in Native American Indian Studies ..................................................................................422Five College Certifi cate in Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies ...........................................................423Five College Film Studies .........................................................................................................................................424Five College Self-Instructional Language Program ...............................................................................................425

The Athletic Program ..................................................................................................................................................426Directory .......................................................................................................................................................................427

The Board of Trustees ..............................................................................................................................................427Faculty ......................................................................................................................................................................428Administration .........................................................................................................................................................454Standing Committees ..............................................................................................................................................457Alumnae Association ...............................................................................................................................................458

Index ............................................................................................................................................................................459Class Schedule ...................................................................................................................................... inside back cover

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iv

By Air: Bradley International, located about 35 miles south of Northampton in Windsor Locks, Connecticut, is the nearest airport and is served by all major air lines. Limousines, buses and rental cars are available at the airport. Flying into Bra d ley rather than into Bos ton’s Logan Airport gives you a shorter drive to Northampton and spares you city traffic congestion.

By Train: Amtrak serves Springfield, Mas sa chu setts, which is 20 miles south of Northampton. From the train station, you can reach Northampton by taxi, rent al car or bus. The Spring field bus station is a short walk from the train station.

How to Get to SmithBy Bus: Greyhound, Vermont Transit and Peter Pan bus lines serve the area. Most routes go to the main bus terminal in Springfield, where you can catch an oth er bus to Northampton. Buses run almost hourly between Springfield and Northampton. Smith is a 10-minute walk or a short taxi ride from the bus station.

By Car: Northampton is on Route I-91. Take Exit 18, and follow Route 5 north into the center of town. Turn left onto Route 9. Go straight through four sets of traffic lights, turning left into College Lane shortly after the third set. The Office of Ad mis sion is on your right, over-looking Paradise Pond. Parking is available next to the office and along Route 9.

Smith College is accredited by the New En gland Association of Schools and Colleges. Mem ber ship in the associa-tion indicates that the institution has been carefully evaluated and found to meet standards agreed upon by quali-fied educators.

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Smith College, Northampton, Massachusetts

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v

Inquiries and Vis itsVisitors are always welcome at the college. Student guides are available to all visitors for tours of the cam-pus; arrangements can be made through the Office of Admission. Administrative offices are open Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. during the academic year. (Refer to the college calendar, p. vii, for the dates that the college is in ses sion.) In the summer, offices are open from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. You may be able to make appointments to meet with office staff at other times, in clud ing hol i days. Any ques tions about Smith Col lege may be ad dressed to the fol low ing officers and their staffs by mail, tele phone, e-mail or appointment.

AdmissionAudrey Smith, Dean of EnrollmentDebra Shaver, Director of Admission7 College Lane, (413) 585-2500; (800) 383-3232 We urge prospective students to make ap point ments for interviews in advance with the Office of Admission. The Office of Admission sched ules these appointments from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. From mid-Sep tem ber through January, appointments can also be made on Saturdays from 9 a.m. to noon. Gen-eral information sessions are also held twice daily and on Saturdays from mid-July through January. Please visit www.smith.edu/admission for details.

Financial Aid, Campus Jobs and Billing for UndergraduatesDeborah Luekens, Director of Student Financial Ser vic es College Hall(413) 585-2530E-mail: [emailprotected]

Academic StandingMaureen A. Mahoney, Dean of the CollegeCollege Hall, (413) 585-4900Tom Riddell, Associate Dean of the College and Dean

of the First-Year Class; Acting Dean of the College (spring)

Jane Stangl, Acting Dean of the First-Year Class (spring)

Margaret Bruzelius, Dean of the Sophom*ore and Junior Classes and Acting Associate Dean of the

College

Margaret Zelljadt, Dean of the Senior ClassCollege Hall, (413) 585-4910Erika J. Laquer, Dean of Ada Comstock Scholars and

Transfer StudentsCollege Hall, (413) 585-3090

AdvancementPatricia Jackson, Vice President for AdvancementAlumnae House, (413) 585-2020

Alumnae AssociationCarrie Cadwell Brown, Executive DirectorAlumnae House, (413) 585-2020

Career Planning and Alumnae ReferencesStacie Hagenbaugh, Director of Career Development Office Drew Hall, (413) 585-2570

College RelationsLaurie Fenlason, Executive Director of Public Affairs and Special Assistant to the PresidentGarrison Hall, (413) 585-2170

Graduate StudyDanielle Carr Ramdath, DirectorCollege Hall, (413) 585-3000

Medical Services and Student HealthLeslie R. Jaffe, College Physician and Director of Health ServicesElizabeth Mason Infirmary, (413) 585-2800

Religious LifeJennifer Walters, Dean of Religious LifeHelen Hills Hills Chapel, (413) 585-2750

School for Social WorkCarolyn Jacobs, DeanLilly Hall, (413) 585-7950

Student AffairsJulianne Ohotnicky, Dean of StudentsCollege Hall, (413) 585-4940

Transcripts and RecordsPatricia O’Neil, RegistrarCollege Hall, (413) 585-2550

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Academic Calendar, 2007-08Fall Semester, 2007Tuesday, August 28–Wednesday, September 5Orientation for entering students

Friday, August 31, and Saturday, September 1 Central check-in for entering students

Tuesday, September 4, and Wednesday, September 5 Central check-in for returning students

Wednesday, September 5, 7:30 p.m.Opening Convocation

Thursday, September 6, 8 a.m.Classes begin

To be announced by the presidentMountain Day (holiday)—Classes scheduled before 7 p.m. are canceled.

Saturday, October 6–Tuesday, October 9Autumn recess

Friday, October 19–Sunday, October 21Family Weekend

Thursday, November 1Otelia Cromwell Day—Afternoon and evening class es are canceled.

Monday, November 5–Friday, November 16Advising and course registration for the second semester

Wednesday, November 21–Sunday, November 25Thanksgiving recess (Houses close at 10 a.m. on Novem-ber 21 and open at 1 p.m. on November 25.)

Thursday, December 13Last day of classes

Friday, December 14–Monday, December 17 Pre-examination study period

Tuesday, December 18–Friday, December 21Midyear examinations

Saturday, December 22–Sunday, January 6Winter recess (Houses and Friedman apartments close at 10 a.m. on De cem ber 22 and open at 1 p.m. on Jan u ary 6.)

Interterm, 2008Monday, January 7–Saturday, January 26

Spring Semester, 2008Thursday, January 24–Sunday, January 27Orientation for entering students

Monday, January 28, 8 a.m.Classes begin

Wednesday, February 20Rally Day—All classes are canceled.

Saturday, March 15–Sunday, March 23Spring recess (Houses close at 10 a.m. on March 15 and open at 1 p.m. on March 23.)

Monday, April 7–Friday, April 18Advising and course registration for the first semester of 2008–09

Friday, May 2Last day of classes

Saturday, May 3–Monday, May 5Pre-examination study period

Tuesday, May 6–Friday, May 9Final examinations

Saturday, May 10Houses close for all students except ’08 graduates, Com mence ment workers and those with Five Col lege finals after May 10.

Sunday, May 18Commencement

Monday, May 19All houses close at noon.

The calendar for the academic year consists of two semesters separated by an interterm of approximately three weeks. Each semester allows for 13 weeks of classes followed by a pre-examination study period and a four-day examination period. Please visit www.smith.edu/academiccalendar for further details.

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Smith CollegeMission and History

MissionSmith College educates women of promise for lives of distinction. A college of and for the world, Smith links the power of the liberal arts to excellence in research and scholarship, developing leaders for society’s challenges.

Values• Smith is a community dedicated to learning, teaching, scholarship, discovery, creativity and critical thought.• Smith is committed to access and diversity, recruiting and supporting talented, ambitious women of all backgrounds.• Smith educates women to understand the complexity of human history and the variety of the world’s cultures

through engagement with social, political, aesthetic and scientific issues.• Smith prepares women to fulfill their responsibilities to the local, national and global communities in which

they live and to steward the resources that sustain them.

History of Smith CollegeSmith College is a distinguished liberal arts college committed to providing the highest quality undergraduate educa-tion for women to enable them to develop their intellects and talents and to participate effectively and fully in society. Smith began in the nineteenth century in the mind and conscience of a New England woman. In her will, Sophia Smith articulated her vision of a liberal arts college for women, with the purpose that “women’s ‘wrongs’ will be redressed, their wages adjusted, their weight of influence in reforming the evils of society will be greatly increased as teachers, as writers, as mothers, as members of society, their power for good will be incalculably en-larged.” Through its commitment to academic excellence and its active engagement with the issues of our time, Smith remains faithful to its founder’s ideals. The college envisioned by Sophia Smith and her minister, John M. Greene, resembled many other old New England colleges in its religious orientation, with all education at the college “pervaded by the Spirit of Evangelical Christian Religion” but “without giving preference to any sect or denomination.” Smith has changed much since its founding in 1871. But throughout its history there have been cer tain en-during constants: an uncompromising defense of academic and intellectual freedom, an attention to the relation between college education and the larger public issues of world order and human dignity, and a concern for the rights and privileges of women. Indeed, at a time when most people had narrow views of women’s abilities and their proper role in society, Sophia Smith showed not only concern with the particular needs of young women but also faith in their still underdeveloped powers. After enumerating the subjects that continue to be a vital part of the college’s curriculum, she added:

And in such other studies as coming times may develop or demand for the ed u ca tion of wom en and the progress of the race, I would have the education suited to the mental and physi-cal wants of women. It is not my design to render my sex any the less feminine, but to develop as fully as may be the powers of womanhood, and furnish wom en with the means of usefulness, hap pi ness and honor now withheld from them.

In the fall of 1875, Smith College opened with 14 students and six faculty under the presidency of Laurenus Clark Seelye. Its small campus was planned to make the college part of what John M. Greene called “the real prac-

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2 History of Smith

tical life” of a New England town, rather than a sequestered academic preserve. College Hall, the Victorian Gothic administrative and classroom building, dominated the head of Northampton’s Main Street. For study and worship, students used the town’s well-endowed public library and various churches. Instead of a dormitory, students lived in a “cottage,” where life was more familial than institutional. Thus began the “house” system that, with some modifications, the college still employs today. The main lines of Smith’s founding educational policy, laid down in President Seelye’s inaugural address, remain valid today: then as now, the standards for admission were as high as those of the best colleges for men; then as now, a truly liberal education was fostered by a broad curriculum of the hu man i ties, the fine arts and the natural and social sciences. During the 35 years of President Seelye’s administration, the college prospered mightily. Its assets grew from Sophia Smith’s original bequest of about $400,000 to more than $3,000,000; its faculty to 122; its student body to 1,635; its buildings to 35. These buildings included Alumnae Gymnasium, site of the first women’s basketball game, which now houses the College Archives and is connected to the Wil l iam Allan Neilson Library, one of the best-resourced undergraduate libraries in the country. Smith’s second president, Marion LeRoy Burton, took office in 1910. President Burton, a graduate of Yale Di-vinity School, was a gifted public speaker with an especially acute business sense. He used these talents to help the college raise the amazing sum of $1,000,000—a huge endowment campaign for any college at that time. With the college’s increased endowment, President Burton was able to increase fac ul ty salaries substantially and improve the faculty-to-student ratio. President Burton’s fund drive also invigorated the alumnae, bringing them closer to the college than ever before and increasing their rep re sen ta tion on the board of trustees. Along with improving the financial state and business methods of the college, President Burton con trib ut ed to a revision of the curriculum and initiated college honors programs to recognize out stand ing students. He also helped to organize a cooperative admission system among Smith, Mount Holyoke, Wellesley and Vassar, the finest women’s colleges of the day. President Burton’s accomplishments are com mem o rat ed today by Burton Hall, the science building that his fund drive helped to finance. When William Allan Neilson became president in 1917, Smith was already one of the largest women’s colleges in the world. President Neilson shrewdly developed the advantages of large academic institutions while maintain-ing the benefits of a small one. Under his leadership, the size of the faculty continued to increase while the number of students remained at about 2,000. The curriculum was revised to provide a pattern still followed in many Ameri-can colleges—a broad foundation in various fields of knowledge, later complemented by the more intensive study of a major subject. The college expanded honors pro grams and initiated interdepartmental majors in science, landscape architecture and theatre. The School for Social Work, a coeducational graduate program, was founded. And more college houses were built, mainly in the Georgian complex called “the Quad,” so that every student could live on campus. Not only did President Neilson help make Smith College one of the leading colleges in the United States, whether for men or women, but he also developed it into an institution of international distinction and concerns. President Neilson, himself a Scotsman, married to a well-educated German woman, trans formed the college from a high-minded but provincial community in the hinterland of Massachusetts into a cos mo pol i tan center constant-ly animated by ideas from abroad. Between the two world wars, he brought many important exiled or endangered foreign teachers, scholars, lecturers and artists to the college. Meanwhile, as long as peace lasted, Smith students went to study in France, Italy and Spain on the Junior Year Abroad Program instituted by the college in 1924. President Neilson retired in 1939, just before the outbreak of World War II, and for one year Eliz a beth Cutter Morrow, an alumna trustee, served as acting president. Herbert Davis took office as Smith’s fourth president in 1940 and reaffirmed the contributions that a liberal arts college could make to a trou bled world. Already during World War I a group of Smith alumnae had gone to France to do relief work in the town of Grécourt; a replica of Grécourt’s chateau gates is now emblematic of the college. Soon after the 1941 bombing of Pearl Harbor, the college agreed to provide facilities on its campus for the first Officers’ Training Unit of the Women’s Reserve, or WAVES. The college added a summer term from 1942 to 1945 so some students could graduate more quickly and go on to government, hospital or military service. Though physically isolated by travel restrictions, the college retained its cosmopolitan character as refugees came to lecture, teach and study. And foreign films were shown regularly in Sage Hall—a practice that would give generations of

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students their sensitivity both to other cultures and to an important, relatively new art. President Davis’ administra-tion was marked by intensified academic life, re flect ing his belief that serious study was a way of confronting the global threat to civilization. Benjamin Fletcher Wright came from Harvard to become Smith’s fifth president in 1949. The college had by then resumed its regular calendar and completed several much-needed building projects, in clud ing a new heating plant and a student recreation center named for retiring President Davis. The most mem o ra ble achievements of President Wright’s administration were the strengthening of Smith’s financial position and the defense of academic freedom during the 1950s. In 1950, the $7 Million Fund Drive was triumphantly completed, enabling the college to improve fa cil i ties and increase faculty salaries. In 1955, the Helen Hills Hills Chapel was completed, giving Smith its own place of wor-ship. The early 1950s were not, though, easy years for colleges; McCarthyism bred a wide spread suspicion of any writing or teaching that might seem left of center. In defending his faculty mem bers’ right to political and intellec-tual independence, President Wright showed great courage and states man ship. Complementing his achievements was the financial and moral support of Smith’s Alumnae As so ci a tion, by now the most devoted and active group of its kind in the country. Before President Wright’s term ended, the college received a large gift for constructing a new faculty office and classroom building to be named for him. When Thomas Corwin Mendenhall came from Yale in 1959 to become Smith’s sixth president, both the college and the country at large were enjoying peace and prosperity. During the 1960s, social and cultural changes stirred the college profoundly, and a series of powerful movements influenced the larg er society and the academic world alike. In response to the needs of increasingly independent and ambitious stu dents, the curriculum was thoroughly revised. Collegewide requirements were set aside and independent study encouraged. The college made more varied educational experiences available to Smith un der grad u ates by extending cooperation with its neighbors—Am-herst, Hampshire and Mount Holyoke colleges and the University of Massachusetts. And Smith joined other private colleges in the North east to develop the Twelve College Exchange Program. The college added buildings with the most modern facilities for the study of the natural sciences, performing arts and fine arts. The new fine arts center included the Smith College Museum of Art, now one of the most distinguished college museums in the country. The 1960s saw the civil rights, the students’ rights and the anti-war movements take root and grow at many of the country’s universities and colleges, including Smith. Thanks to these movements and to the wisdom, tact and humor of President Mendenhall, the college emerged from the 1960s with a more precise awareness of student needs and an active, practical sense of social responsibility. Meanwhile, life in the college houses was changing. The old rules governing late evenings out and male visi-tors were relaxed, then abandoned. Not surprisingly, when Vassar began to admit men, and Yale, Princeton and Dartmouth to admit women as candidates for degrees, some members of the college com mu ni ty wondered whether Smith should also become coeducational. In 1971, a committee of trust ees, faculty, administration, students and alumnae studied the question in detail. The committee con clud ed that admitting men as candidates for the Smith degree would detract from the founding purpose of the college—to provide the best possible education for women. In the late 1960s and early 1970s another important movement—the women’s movement—was gath er ing momentum. This was to have a profound effect on American society and to confirm the orig i nal pur pose of Smith College. The college began its second century in 1975 by inaugurating its first wom an pres i dent, Jill Ker Conway, who came to Smith from Australia by way of Harvard and the Uni ver si ty of Toronto. She was a charismatic and energetic leader with a vision for women’s education, and her administration was marked by three major accom-plishments: a large-scale renovation and expansion of Neilson Library, evidence of Smith’s undiminished concern for the heart of the liberal arts; the rapid growth of the Ada Comstock Scholars Program, through which women be-yond the traditional college age could earn a Smith degree; and exceptionally successful fund-raising efforts. Also during President Conway’s administration, the Career Development Office was expanded to better counsel Smith students and alumnae about career opportunities and graduate training for women. Recognizing the rapidly grow-ing emphasis on fitness and athletics for women, Smith built the Ainsworth Gymnasium and broke ground for new indoor and outdoor track and tennis facilities. President Conway’s contributions un der scored her commitment to women’s colleges and a liberal arts education in today’s society.

History of Smith 3

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4 History of Smith

The college that President Conway left to her successor was in some ways very different from the col lege served by Presidents Seelye, Burton and Neilson. When Mary Maples Dunn came to Smith in 1985 after many years as a professor of history and then as dean of Bryn Mawr College, Smith’s student body had diversified. During its early decades the student body had been overwhelmingly Protestant, but by the 1970s, Roman Catholic and Jewish col-lege chaplains served alongside the Protestant chaplain. All racial, ethnic and religious groups are now well repre-sented on campus, evidence of Smith’s continuing moral and intellectual commitment to diversity. In her decade as president, Mary Maples Dunn led the college through exciting and challenging times. During her tenure, the college raised more than $300 million, constructed two major buildings and ren o vat ed many more, enhanced communication on and off campus, attracted record numbers of applicants (while upholding the same academic standards) and doubled the value of its en dow ment. Com put er tech nol o gy trans formed the way Smith conducted its business. And the curriculum be came broad er in scope, with five new majors and increased course offerings in non-Western and ne glect ed American cul tures. In 1995 Ruth Simmons became Smith’s ninth president, the first African-American woman to head any top-ranked American col lege or university. Simmons galvanized the cam pus through an ambitious campuswide self-study process that resulted in a number of land mark initiatives, including Praxis, a program that allows every Smith student the opportunity to elect an internship funded by the college; an engineering pro gram, the first at a women’s college; programs in the humanities that include a po et ry center and a peer-reviewed journal devoted to publishing schol ar ly works by and about women of color; and curricular innovations that include intensive semi-nars for first-year students and programs to encourage students’ speaking and writing skills. A number of building projects were launched during Simmons’ administration; most sig nif i cant was a $35-mil-lion expansion and ren o va tion of the Smith College Museum of Art, art department and art library. Construction of the Campus Center began, and the Lyman Con ser va to ry was renovated. Simmons left Smith in June 2001, assuming the presidency of Brown University. John M. Connolly, Smith’s first provost, served as acting president for one year, skillfully guiding the college through the national trauma of September 11, 2001, and its aftermath. A widely respected scholar of Victorian literature, Carol T. Christ took up her duties as Smith’s 10th president in June 2002. In her first four years at Smith, Christ launched an energetic program of outreach, innovation and long-range planning, including capital planning. She encouraged the development of coursework emphasiz-ing fluency in the diversity of American cultures and the diversity of experience of American ethnic groups and launched a review, conducted by members of the Smith faculty and outside scholars, to determine the distinctive intellectual traditions of the Smith curriculum. Under her leadership, hundreds of alumnae, students, faculty and staff participated in presidential dialogues, as part of strategic planning for Smith’s next decade. The college has achieved distinction for its commitment to promoting access and diversity, recruiting and supporting highly tal-ented, ambitious women of all backgrounds. Major building projects have come to fruition: the renovation of and addition to the Brown Fine Arts Center; a dramatic new Campus Center; a renovated Lyman Conservatory; the im-pressive Olin Fitness Center; new homes for the Poetry Center and Mwangi Cultural Center; the renovation of Lilly Hall, home of the college’s School for Social Work; and the construction of Conway House, an apartment building for Ada Comstock Scholars with children. Construction is beginning for Ford Hall, a state-of-the-art, sustainably designed classroom and laboratory facility for the college’s pioneering Picker Engineering Program and the sci-ences. Apartments slated for removal for the science expansion are being replaced by the college, reflecting Smith’s commitment to assisting the city of Northampton with issues of affordable housing. Today the college continues to benefit from a dynamic relationship between in no va tion and tradition. Smith is still very much a part of Northampton, now a lively and sophisticated cul tur al center in its own right. The majority of students still live in college houses with their own common rooms, in accord with the original “cottage” plan. The faculty and administration are still composed of highly accomplished men and wom en who work together in a professional community with mutual respect. And while Smith’s cur ric u lum of the hu man i ties, arts and sci enc es still flourishes, the college continues to respond to the new in tel lec tu al needs of today’s women—of fer ing majors or inter-departmental programs in com put er sci ence, en gi neer ing, the study of women and gender, Third World de vel op ment, neuroscience, film studies, Latin American and Latino/a studies, Jewish studies, history of science and technology, and other expanding and emerg ing fields. Were Sophia Smith to visit Northampton today, she would no doubt find her vision realized, as stu dents at her college prepare themselves for exemplary lives of lead er ship and service.

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William Allan Neilson Professorship 5

The William Allan Neilson Chairof ResearchThe William Allan Neilson Professorship, com mem o -rat ing President Neilson’s profound concern for schol-arship and research, has been held by the following distinguished scholars:

Kurt Koffka, Ph.D.Psychology, 1927–32

G. Antonio Borgese, Ph.D.Comparative Literature, 1932–35

Sir Herbert J.C. Grierson, MA., LL.D., Litt.D.English, second semester, 1937–38

Alfred Einstein, Dr. Phil.Music, first semester, 1939–40; 1949–50

George Edward Moore, D.Litt., LL.D.Philosophy, first semester, 1940–41

Karl Kelchner Darrow, Ph.D.Physics, second semester, 1940–41

Carl Lotus Becker, Ph.D., Litt.D.History, second semester, 1941–42

Albert F. Blakeslee, Ph.D., Sc.D. (Hon.)Botany, 1942–43

Edgar Wind, Ph.D.Art, 1944–48

David Nichol Smith, M.A., D.Litt. (Hon.), LL.D.English, first semester, 1946–47

David Mitrany, Ph.D., D.Sc.International Relations, second semester, 1950–51

Pieter Geyl, Litt.D.History, second semester, 1951–52

Wystan Hugh Auden, B.A.English, second semester, 1952–53

Alfred Kazin, M.A.English, 1954–55

Harlow Shapley, Ph.D., LL.D., Sc.D., Litt.D., Dr. (Hon.)Astronomy, first semester, 1956–57

Philip Ellis Wheelwright, Ph.D.Philosophy, second semester, 1957–58

Karl Lehmann, Ph.D.Art, second semester, 1958–59

Alvin Harvey Hansen, Ph.D., LL.D.Economics, second semester, 1959–60

Philippe Emmanuel Le Corbeiller, Dr.-ès-Sc., A.M. (Hon.)Physics, first semester, 1960–61

Eudora Welty, B.A., Litt.D.English, second semester, 1961–62

Dénes Bartha, Ph.D.Music, second semester, 1963–64

Dietrich Gerhard, Ph.D.History, first semester, 1967–68

Louis Frederick Fieser, Ph.D., Sc.D. (Hon.), D.Pharm. (Hon.)Chemistry, second semester, 1967–68

Wolfgang Stechow, Dr. Phil., L.H.D., D.F.A. (Hon.)Art, second semester, 1968–69

Robert A. Nisbet, Ph.D.Sociology and Anthropology, first semester, 1971–72

Louise Cuyler, Ph.D.Music, second semester, 1974–75

Herbert G. Gutman, Ph.D.American Studies, 1977–78

Renée C. Fox, Ph.D., Litt.D. (Hon.)Sociology and Anthropology, first semester, 1980–81

Auguste Anglès, Docteur ès LettresFrench, first semester, 1981–82

Victor Turner, Ph.D.Religion and Biblical Literature, first semester, 1982–83

Robert Brentano, D. Phil.History, first semester, 1985–86

Germaine Brée, Ph.D.Comparative Literature, second semester, 1985–86

Carsten Thomassen, Ph.D.Mathematics, first semester, 1987–88

Charles Hamilton, J.D., Ph.D.Government, second semester, 1988–89

Triloki Nath Madan, Ph.D.Anthropology, first semester, 1990–91

Armstead L. Robinson, Ph.D.Afro-American Studies, first semester, 1991–92

Sheila S. Walker, Ph.D.Afro-American Studies, second semester, 1991–92

Roy S. Bryce-Laporte, Ph.D.Sociology, first semester, 1993–94

Trinh T. Minh-ha, Ph.D.Women’s Studies, second semester, 1993–94

Rey Chow, Ph.D.Comparative Literature, second semester, 1995–96

June Nash, Ph.D.Latin American Studies, first semester, 1996–97

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6 William Allan Neilson Professorship/Ruth and Clarence Kennedy Professorship

Judith Plaskow, Ph.D.Women’s Studies and Jewish Studies, second se mes ter, 1996–97

Irwin P. Ting, Ph.D.Biological Sciences, first se mes ter, 1997–98

Ruth Klüger, Ph.D.German Studies, first se mes ter, 1998–99

Romila Thapar, Ph.D.Religion and Biblical Literature, second se mes ter, 1998–99

Margaret Lock, Ph.D.Anthropology, first se mes ter, 1999–2000

Thomas Greene, Ph.D.English Language and Literature, first se mes ter, 2000–01

Carolyn Cohen, Ph.D.Biochemistry/Biological Sciences, second semester, 2001–02

Nuala Ni DhombnaillComparative Literature, first semester, 2002–03

Lauren Berlant, Ph.D.Women’s Studies, first semester, 2003–04

Nawal El Saadawi, M.D.Comparative Literature, first semester, 2004–05

Frances Fox Piven, Ph.D.Political Science and Sociology, second semester, 2006–07

Mohd Anis Md Nor, Ph.D.Music, Dance and Theatre, first semester, 2007–08

The Ruth and Clarence Kennedy Professorship in Renaissance StudiesThe Ruth and Clarence Kennedy Professorship in the Renaissance, commemorating the Kennedys’ commit-ment to the study of the Renaissance and their long-standing devotion to Smith College, has been held by the following distinguished scholars:

Charles Mitchell, M.A.Art History, 1974–75

Felix Gilbert, Ph.D.History, 1975–76

Giuseppe Billanovich, Dottore di Letteratura ItalianaItalian Humanism, second semester, 1976–77

Jean J. Seznec, Docteur ès LettresFrench, second semester, 1977–78

Hans R. Guggisberg, D.Phil.History, first semester, 1980–81

Alistair Crombie, Ph.D.History of Science, second semester, 1981–82

John Coolidge, Ph.D.Architecture and Art History, second semester, 1982–83

Howard Mayer Brown, Ph.D.Music, first semester, 1983–84

Hendrik W. van Os, Ph.D.Art History, first semester, 1987–88

George Kubler, Ph.D.Art History, second semester, 1989–90

Susan Donahue Kuretsky, Ph.D.Art History, second semester, 1991–92

Diane De Grazia, Ph.D.Art, second semester, 1993–94

Larry Silver, Ph.D.Art History, first semester, 1994–95

Andrée Hayum, Ph.D.Art History, second semester, 1994–95

Mark P. O. Morford, Ph.D.Classical Languages and Literatures, 1995–96

Kenneth R. Stow, Ph.D.Jewish Studies, 1996–97

AnnaMaria Petrioli Tofani, Dottore in LettereArt History and Italian Language and Literature, first se mes ter, 1997–98

Nancy Siraisi, Ph.D.History of Sciences, first se mes ter, 1998–99

Keith Christiansen, Ph.D.Art History, first se mes ter, 1999–2000

Phyllis Pray Bober, Ph.D.Art History, first se mes ter, 2001–02

Alison Brown, M.A.History, first semester, 2001–02

Harry Berger, Jr., Ph.D.Comparative Literature, first semester, 2002–03

James M. Saslow, Ph.D.Art History, second semester, 2003–04

Richard Cooper, Ph.D.French, first semester, 2004–05

Deborah Howard, Ph.D.Art, second semester, 2005–06

Andreas Kleinert, Ph.D.History of Science, first semester, 2006–07

Caroline Elam, Ph.D.Art History, second semester, 2007–08

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7

The Academic Pro gramSmith: A Liberal Arts College

The tradition of the liberal arts reach es back into classical antiquity. Training the mind through the study of languages, lit er a ture, history, culture, society, math e mat ics, sci ence, the arts and phi los o phy has for

centuries been the favored ap proach in Europe and America for ed u cat ing lead ers. It is a general training, not in tend ed as a prep a ra tion for any one profession. In the 19th century the liberal arts were char ac ter ized as pro vid ing “the discipline and furniture of the mind: expanding its powers, and storing it with knowl edge,” to which was add ed, “The former of these is, perhaps, the more important of the two.” At many liberal arts colleges today this ideal is un der stood as implying both breadth and depth in each student’s course of studies, as well as the ac qui si tion of crucial skills in writing, public speak ing and quantitative rea son ing. From its foundation in 1871 Smith has taken a progressive, expansive and student-oriented view of its role as a liberal arts college. To the studies of the humanities and sciences the college early add ed courses in art and music, a substantial in no va tion for its time. In the same spirit the faculty has continued to integrate the new and the old, respecting all the while the indi-vidual needs of, and differences among, its students. As an early dean of the faculty wrote, it “is always the problem of education, to secure the proper amount of sys tem and the due proportion of individual liberty, to give discipline to the impulsive and wayward and large-ness of opportunity to those who will make good use of it.” In the spirit of “individual liberty [and] large ness of opportunity” Smith College has since 1970 had no distribution requirements for graduation. In the interest of “discipline” each student must complete a major, to give depth to her studies, while to guarantee breadth she must take at least 64 credits outside the department or program of her ma jor. As for “system,” the college assigns each beginning student a faculty member as academic adviser; each student later chooses a major adviser. Students, in consultation with their advisers, are expected to select a curriculum that has both breadth

and depth, engages with cultures other than their own, and develops critical skills in writing, public speaking, and quantitative reasoning. The Smith faculty strongly recommends that stu-dents “pursue studies in the seven major fields of knowl-edge” listed below. Completion of a course in each of these areas is a condition for Latin Honors at graduation: to be eligible each student must take at least one course in each of the seven areas (see following, and Latin Hon-ors on p. 27). Students who complete a course in each area will receive Liberal Arts Commendation and this will be noted on their transcripts.

The CurriculumEach discipline within the liberal arts framework offers students a valid perspective on the world’s past, present and future. Therefore, we rec om mend that students pursue studies in the following seven major fields of knowledge:1) Literature, either in English or in some other lan-

guage, because it is a crucial form of ex pres sion, contributes to our understanding of hu man experi-ence and plays a central role in the development of culture;

2) Historical studies, either in history or in his tor i cal ly oriented courses in art, music, re li gion, philosophy and theatre, because they provide a perspective on the development of human so ci ety and culture and free us from the pa ro chi al ism of the present;

3) Social science, because it offers a systematic and critical inquiry into human nature, social institu-tions and human relationships;

4) Natural science, because of its methods, its contribu-tion to our understanding of the world around us and its significance in modern cul ture;

5) Mathematics and analytic philosophy, be cause they foster an understanding of the na ture and use of formal, rational thought;

6) The arts, because they constitute the media through which people have sought, through the ages, to ex-press their deepest feelings and val ues;

7) A foreign language, because it frees one from the limits of one’s own tongue, provides access to another

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8 The Academic Program

culture and makes possible com mu ni ca tion outside one’s own society.

We further recommend that students take per for mance courses offered in exercise and sport stud ies, because they provide opportunities for rec re ation, health and the development of skills for the complete person.

Curricular Expectations and RequirementsIn the course of their educations, Smith students are expected to become acquainted with—to master, as far as they are able—certain bodies of knowledge, but they are also expected to learn the intellectual skills necessary for using and extending that knowledge. The list below summarizes those expectations. While ac-knowledging that education can never be defined by a listing of subjects or skills, the faculty believes that such a listing may usefully contribute to the planning of an education, and it offers the list below in that spirit, as an aid to students as they choose their courses and assess their individual progress, and to advisers as they assist in that process. In order to put their knowledge to use, to lay a foundation for further study, and to make effective con-tributions to the work of their communities, students should, by the time they graduate:

I. Develop the ability to think critically and analyti-cally and to convey knowledge and understanding, which require

• writing clearly • speaking articulately • reading closely • evaluating and presenting evidence accurately • knowing and using quantitative skills • applying scientific reasoning • engaging with artistic creation and expression • working both independently and collabora- tively

II. Develop a historical and comparative perspective, which requires

• learning foreign languages • studying the historical development of societies, cultures, and philosophies • understanding multi- and inter-disciplinary approaches

III. Become an informed global citizen, which requires • engaging with communities beyond Smith • learning tolerance and understanding diversity • applying moral reasoning to ethical problems • understanding environmental challenges

The Writing RequirementEach first-year student is required, during her first or second semester at Smith, to complete with a grade of C- or higher at least one writing-intensive course. Based on their level of proficiency, students will be directed toward appropriate intensive writing courses. Writing intensive courses will devote a significant amount of class time to teaching students to write with precision, clarity, economy and some degree of elegance. That is to say,

1) to articulate a thesis or central argument, or to cre-ate a description or report, with an orderly sequence of ideas, apt transitions, and a purpose clear to the intended audience;

2) to support an argument and to enrich an explana-tion with evidence;

3) when appropriate, to identify and to evaluate suit-able primary and secondary sources for scholarly work, demonstrating awareness of library cata-logues and databases and of the values and limita-tions of Internet resources;

4) to incorporate the work of others (by quotation, summary or paraphrase) concisely, effectively and with attention to the models of citation of the various disciplines and with respect for academic integrity;

5) to compose paragraphs that are unified and coher-ent;

6) to edit work until it is orderly, clear and free of violations of the conventions of standard written English (grammar, usage, punctuation, diction, syntax).

For the bachelor of arts degree, there are no fur ther re quired courses out side the stu dent’s field of con cen -tra tion. The col lege does, however, make two de mands of the stu dent: that she com plete a major and that she take at least half of her courses out side the department or program of her major. The curricular re quire ments for the bachelor of science degree in en gi neer ing are listed in the courses of study section under Engineer-ing. Fur ther more, stu dents who wish to be come el i gi ble for Latin Hon ors (see p. 27) at grad u a tion or who wish

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The Academic Program 9

to have Liberal Arts Commendation indicated on their transcript must elect at least one course (nor mal ly four cred its) in each of the seven major fields of knowledge listed above. Each student has the freedom and re spon -si bil i ty to choose, with the help of academic ad vis ers, a course of studies to fit her individual needs and inter-ests. The cur ric u lar expectations and re quire ments for the degree there fore allow great flex i bil i ty in the design of a course of study leading to the de gree.

The MajorA student’s program requires a minimum of 36 credits in a departmental or interdepartmental ma jor. For the bachelor of arts degree, one-half of a stu dent’s total pro gram, or at least 64 credits, shall be taken out side the de part ment or program of the major. Any course (in clud ing prerequisites) which is ex plic it ly listed in the catalogue as re quired for, or count ing to ward, ful fill ing the re quire ments of the major shall be con- sid ered to be inside the major for the pur pos es of this rule. The sole exception to the 64-credit rule is that in the case of a major requiring study of two foreign lan-guages taught within a single department or program, no fewer than 56 credits shall be taken outside the department or program of the major. The re quire ments for each ma jor are described at the end of the course listings for each major de part ment and program. Students de clare their ma jors no later than the reg is tra tion period during the sec ond semester of the soph o more year but may de clare them ear li er. Once the major is de clared, a mem ber of the fac ul ty in the major de part ment, either chosen or assigned, serves as the student’s adviser. Major programs are offered by the following depart-ments:Afro-American Studies Education and ChildAnthropology StudyArt Engineering Astronomy English Language andBiological Sciences LiteratureChemistry French Studies Classical Languages and German Studies Literatures GeologyComputer Science GovernmentDance HistoryEast Asian Languages Italian Language and Literatures and LiteratureEconomics Italian Studies

Jewish Studies ReligionMathematics and Russian Language Statistics and LiteratureMusic Sociology Philosophy Spanish and Physics Portuguese Psychology Theatre

Interdepartmental majors are offered in the following areas:American Studies Medieval StudiesBiochemistry Neuroscience Comparative Literature Study of Women andEast Asian Studies GenderLatin American and Latino/a Studies

If the educational needs of the individual stu dent cannot be met by a course of study in any of the speci-fied majors, a student may design and undertake an interdepartmental major sponsored by advisers from at least two departments, subject to the approval of the Committee on Ac a dem ic Priorities. The guidelines for proposed student-designed interdepartmental majors are available in the class deans’ office, College Hall. Students in departmental majors or in student-de-signed interdepartmental majors may enter the honors program. A description of the hon ors pro gram can be found on page 12. On its official transcripts, the college will rec og nize the completion of no more than two ma jors, or one major and one minor, or one major and one Five Col-lege Certificate for each student, even if the student chooses to complete the re quire ments for additional majors, minors or cer tif i cates. No minor or second major may be in the same department or program as the first major.

The MinorStudents may consider the option of a minor in ad- di tion to a major. A minor consists of a se quence, des-ignated by the faculty, of 20 to 24 cred its from one or more departments. The minor may not be in the same department or program as the student's major. In addition to minors in many departments and programs offering majors, the following in ter de -part men tal minors are offered:

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10 The Academic Program

African Studies LinguisticsAncient Studies Logic Archaeology Marine Science andAstrophysics PolicyDigital Art Medieval StudiesDigital Music Middle East StudiesEast Asian Studies NeuroscienceEnvironmental Science Political Economy and Policy Public PolicyEthics StatisticsFilm Studies Study of Women andHistory of Science Gender and Technology Third World DevelopmentInternational Relations StudiesLandscape Studies Urban StudiesLatin American and Latino/a Studies

Student-Designed Interdepartmental Majors and MinorsThis course of study must differ significantly from an established major or minor and must include concen-trated work in more than one de part ment. For majors, at least one of the departments or programs must itself offer a major. Majors are expected to include 36 to 48 credits in related courses in more than one department. Normally, a minimum of 24 credits are at the 200 level or high er and a minimum of eight are at the 300 lev el. One of the 300-level courses may be the integrating project. Examples of self-designed majors include lib-eral studies and linguistics. Minors are expected to include 20 to 24 cred its in related courses in more than one de part ment, of which no more than eight cred its should be at the 100 level and at least four should be at the 300 level. Proposals for majors may be sub mit ted no earlier than the first semester of the sophom*ore year and no later than the end of ad vis ing week of the sec ond se-mester of the junior year. The dead lines for submission of pro pos als are November 15 and April 15. Proposals for mi nors may be submitted at any time after the ma-jor has been declared but no later than the end of the first se mes ter of the senior year. The major or minor proposal must include a state- ment ex plic it ly de fin ing the subject matter and method of ap proach underlying the design of the major or

mi nor; course lists; and, for the major, a clearly for- mu lat ed integrating course or piece of work. Pro pos als must include letters of support from all ad vis ers repre-senting the areas of study central to the major and writ-ten rec om men da tions signed by the chairs indicating approval of the departments or programs in the major. Information about stu dent-designed in ter de -part men tal majors and mi nors is available from the class deans and the dean of the Ada Comstock Schol ars.

Five College Certificate ProgramsFive College Certificate Programs provide a di rect ed course of study in various interdisciplinary fields through the resources available at the five area col-leges. Certificate programs are offered in addition to or in conjunction with the student’s major. Certificates are awarded upon successful completion of a program by the appropriate Five College faculty councils on the recommendation of designated faculty advisers from the student’s home institution. Current certificate programs require that the student earn a grade of B or above in all courses counting for the certificate and many require students to dem on strate competence in a language other than En glish. Each institution deter-mines the method by which competence will be mea-sured. (See pages 388–408 for individual Five College Certificate offerings).

AdvisingPremajor and Major AdvisersEach student has a faculty adviser who helps her select and register for courses that will satisfy the broad ex-pectations of the college and will further her personal goals and aspirations. The dean of the first-year class assigns a premajor faculty ad vis er to each first-year stu-dent. This faculty mem ber will continue to advise her until she chooses a major. The names of major advisers appear after each department’s course listings. Together the adviser and student devise a bal anced academic program, making full use of the courses and programs available. The adviser approves all registra-tion decisions, including chang es made to the course program after the beginning of a semester. An adviser

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The Academic Program 11

can help a student find academic and personal resourc-es and can help her select and pursue various op tion al programs. It is the joint responsibility of both student and adviser to plan a course program that will lead to successful completion of all degree requirements. In addition to aiding in the selection of cours es, major advisers often counsel students about prepara-tion for graduate schools or careers. The more clearly a student can articulate her own vision and goals, the more productive will be her relationship with her ad-viser.

Minor AdvisersA student electing a minor will have the guidance of a faculty adviser who represents the discipline, in ad-dition to the help of her major adviser. She normally must consult with her minor adviser at the time she initially elects the minor, and again when she needs to certify that the minor has been com plet ed.

Engineering AdvisingStudents who are interested in engineering should consult the faculty listed on page 185.

Prebusiness AdvisingStudents who are interested in pursuing a grad u ate program in business should consult with the Career Development Office, which provides in for ma tion and advice about all career fields and grad u ate training. Juniors and seniors who wish further advice on admis-sions criteria may consult a member of the Prebusiness Advisory Group. Please contact the Career Development Office for the names of faculty and staff members who are mem bers of this group.

Premedical and Prehealth Professions AdvisingStudents who wish to prepare for careers in the health professions have special advising needs. They may major in any subject, provided their program includes courses that will satisfy the min i mum entrance re-quirements for health pro fes sions schools. Students interested in a premedical or other health-related program should consult page 124 for important information.

Prelaw AdvisingLaw schools accept students from any major; there is no prelaw curriculum. Students interested in pursuing a law degree are encouraged to pick up or print off a copy of the Career Development Of fice (CDO) handout on “Law School,” and bring their questions to the pre-law adviser (Daryl Gehman, in the CDO).

Academic Honor SystemIn 1944, the students of Smith College voted to estab-lish the Academic Honor System in the belief that each member of the Smith community has an obligation to uphold the academic standards of the college. The basic premise on which the code is based is that the learning process is a product of individual effort and commitment accompanied by moral and intellectual integrity. The Academic Hon or Code is the institutional expression of these beliefs. The code requires that each individual be honest and respect and respond to the demands of living responsibly in an academic com-munity.

Special Programs

Accelerated Course ProgramWith permission of the administrative board, stu dents having a cumulative average of at least B (3.0) may complete the requirements for the de gree in six or seven semesters. Four semesters, including two of these in the junior or senior year, must be completed in resi-dence at Smith College in Northampton. A student who intends to study away from campus during the junior year should file her acceleration proposal by the end of the first year. A maximum of 32 credits can be accumulated toward the degree through a combination of Ad vanced Placement (or similar), pre-ma tric u la tion, Interterm and summer school credits. Students whose ac- cel er a tion plans include courses to be taken during Interterm should be aware of the fact that these courses are limited both in number and in en roll ment and cannot be guaranteed as part of the ac cel er a tion plan. Requests for permission to ac cel er ate should be filed with the student’s class dean at least two full semesters before the pro posed date of graduation.

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12 The Academic Program

The Ada Comstock Scholars ProgramThe Ada Comstock Scholars Program at Smith com- bines the rigorous academic challenges of the un der -grad u ate program with flexibility for women beyond traditional college age. Many women choose to work or raise a family rather than complete an education, but later wish to return to earn a degree. Established in 1975, the Ada Comstock Scholars Program allows nontraditional students to complete a bach e lor's degree either part-time or full-time. Each Ada Comstock student attends the same class es and fulfills the same requirements as do all other Smith students. The program provides ac a dem ic advising, orientation programs, peer advis-ing, a cen ter for the exclusive use of par tic i pants in the pro gram and some housing. Career counseling and academic assistance are provided through spe cial ized offices available on campus. Financial aid is available to all admitted students based on dem on strat ed need. Reasons for becoming an Ada Comstock Schol ar differ as widely as each woman’s history, age, marital status, parenting circ*mstances and socioeconomic level. Each Ada Comstock Scholar has a high level of ability, strong motivation and at least a year of trans-ferable liberal arts credit. This widely disparate group of women contributes vig or, diversity of perspective, intellectual ability and en thu si asm to all aspects of Smith life. Their achieve ments confirm the academic standard of the college. A student admitted as a traditional first-year or transfer student normally will not be permitted to change her class status to Ada Comstock Scholar. A can di date’s sta tus as an Ada Comstock Scholar must be des ig nat ed at the time of application. For information about application procedures, see pages 43–44. Information about expenses and how to apply for financial aid can be found on pages 33 and 37. For more information about the Ada Comstock Scholars Program, contact the Office of Admission at (413) 585-2523; e-mail, [emailprotected]; or fax (413) 585-2527.

Community Auditing: Nonmatriculated StudentsMembers of the local community who have earned a high school diploma are el i gi ble to audit a lec ture course at Smith on a space-avail able basis with the

per mis sion of the in struc tor and the reg is trar. Forms for the faculty mem ber’s sig na ture and more in for -ma tion about auditing are available at the Office of the Registrar. A fee is charged and is determined by the type of course. Normally stu dio art courses are not open to non-matriculated stu dents. Au di tors are invited to at- tend classes, but they do not par tic i pate in other aspects of college life. Records of audits are not maintained.

Five College InterchangeA student in good standing may take a course without ad di tion al cost at Amherst, Hampshire and Mount Holyoke colleges or the University of Mas sa chu setts, if the course is appropriate to the ed u ca tion al plan of the student and approved by Smith College. A first-semester first-year student must obtain the permission of the class dean before enrolling in a Five College course. A list of Five College courses approved for Smith Col-lege degree credit is available at the reg is trar’s office. Requests for approval of courses not on the list may be submitted to the registrar’s office. How ev er, Smith Col-lege does not accept all Five College cours es for credit toward the Smith degree.

Departmental Honors ProgramThe Departmental Honors Program is for qualified students who want to study a particular topic in depth or undertake research within the de part ment of the major. Students should consult the de part men tal direc-tor of honors about application dead lines. Students must have de part men tal per mis sion and a 3.3 aver-age for all courses in the major and a 3.0 average for courses outside the major through the junior year. Only Smith College, Five College and Smith College Junior Year Abroad grades are counted. Departmental honors re quire ments are outlined in the catalogue following each department’s course offerings. Information re- gard ing procedures can be obtained from de part men tal di rec tors of honors, the class deans or the dean of the Ada Comstock Scholars. The cul mi na tion of the work is a thesis written under the direction of a member of the de part ment.

Independent Study Projects/InternshipsIndependent study projects may be proposed by juniors and seniors who wish to complete a spe cial project of

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The Academic Program 13

work or study on or off cam pus. All projects must be approved by the Committee on Academic Priorities and are under the direct su per vi sion of Smith College faculty members. The maximum that may be granted for an off-campus project is eight credits. The maxi-mum that may be granted for an on-campus project is 16 credits. Any independent study project must be completed with in a single semester. The deadline for sub mis sion of proposals is November 15 for a second-semester program and April 15 for a first-se mes ter program. Information about the In de pen dent Study Program is available in the office of the class deans. No in de pen dent study project may be un der tak en during the summer or January. All internships for credit must be approved in advance by the Committee on Academic Priorities and are under the direct supervision of a member or mem-bers of the faculty of Smith College. A max i mum of eight credits can be granted for ap proved internships. Credit is not given for in tern ships un der tak en during January. For summer in tern ships, tuition is charged by the credit. The dead line for submission of pro pos als is November 15 for a sec ond-semester program and April 15 for a sum mer or first-semester program. In for -ma tion and ap pli ca tions for in tern ships are available in the class deans’ office. A maximum of 16 cred its for in de pen dent study projects and internships combined is al lowed.

Smith Scholars ProgramThe Smith Scholars Program is designed for highly motivated and talented students who want to spend one or two years working on projects of their own devis-ing, freed (in varying degrees) from normal college requirements. A student may apply at any time after the first semester of her sophom*ore year and must submit a detailed state ment of her pro gram, an evaluation of her pro pos al and her ca pac i ty to complete it from those faculty who will advise her and two supporting recom-mendations from instructors who have taught her in class. The dead lines for sub mis sion of proposals for the Smith Scholars Program are November 15 and April 15 of the student’s junior year. The proportion of work to be done in normal courses will be decided jointly by the student, her adviser(s) and the Subcommittee on Honors and Independent Programs. Work done in the program may result in a thesis, a group of related pa-pers, an original piece of work, such as a play, or some combination of these.

A Smith Scholar may or may not complete a regu-lar departmental major. Further details, guide lines and applications are available from the class deans.

Study Abroad ProgramsSmith College offers a wide variety of study abroad pro-grams, from Smith’s own pro grams in West ern Europe to Smith consortial and other approved pro grams all over the world. For the Smith Junior Year Abroad (JYA) programs in Flo rence, Ham burg, Gene va and Paris, a JYA program ap pli ca tion must be filed by Feb ru ary 1 in the Of fice for In ter na tion al Study. For all other study-abroad programs, students must sub mit a plan of study for college approval by February 15 for fall, full year or spring semester study. Students should contact the Of fice for In ter na tion al Study for in for ma tion on dead lines and pro ce dures since some programs allow for a fall application deadline. For all programs, the Smith College com pre hen sive fee is charged. The comprehensive fee, covering tuition, room and board when class es are in session, is the same as the com pre hen sive fee for a year’s study in Northampton. Smith pays tu ition, room and board on behalf of the stu-dent to the study abroad program or the host in sti tu tion. Students are re spon si ble for all expenses and all trav el dur ing program breaks or vacations. In ci den tal ex pens es vary according to in di vid u al tastes and plans, and funds for such ex pens es are not cov ered by the com pre hen sive fee. All students who wish to study abroad must ob tain ap prov al from the Office for International Study. Stu- dents must be in good academic standing with a mini-mum GPA of 3.0, must be in good standing in academic and student conduct matters, have a de clared ma jor and no short age of cred it at the time of ap pli ca tion to be ap proved for study abroad. Exceptions are con sid ered on a case-by-case basis. Stu dents should note that a year or se mes ter abroad does not count to ward the re quired two years in res i dence at Smith Col lege. Any student wishing to spend any part of the senior year abroad on a Smith or non-Smith program must petition the Administrative Board through the class dean. Students attending programs with yearlong courses (LSE, Trinity) receive credit only if they have taken the final exams and final grades have been issued by the host institution. In all instances, Smith reserves the right to approve, retract or deny a student’s participation on study abroad.

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14 The Academic Program

Smith College Junior Year Abroad ProgramsThe Smith College Junior Year Abroad Programs provide students in a variety of disciplines the op por tu ni ty for study, research, in tern ships and res i dence in foreign countries. Smith faculty direct the four pro grams in Eu- rope: France (Par is), Ger ma ny (Ham burg), Italy (Flor-ence) and Swit zer land (Gene va). The pro grams provide a rich op por tu ni ty to ob serve and study the coun tries visited. Stu dents are en cour aged to enjoy the mu sic, art and theatre of each country; meetings are ar ranged with out stand ing scholars, writers and leaders. During the ac a dem ic year students board with lo cal families (Paris and Florence) or live in stu dent residence halls (Geneva and Hamburg). Dur ing va ca tions students are free to travel, although by spe cial ar range ments in some pro-grams they may stay in residence if they prefer. Each Smith JYA program lasts a full ac a dem ic year; stu dents are not accepted for a single se mes ter except for the Hamburg program, which also offers a one-semester option in the spring term. A student studying on a Smith College Junior Year Abroad Program will normally receive 34 cred its for the ac a dem ic year. In exceptional cas es, with the per mis sion of the director and the associate dean for in ter na tion al study, students may earn up to 40 cred its for a year on a Smith Jun ior Year Abroad Pro gram. Each program is directed by a member of the Smith College faculty who serves as the official rep re sen ta tive of the college. The director over sees the academic programs and general welfare of the students. Dur-ing program breaks or vacations the col lege as sumes no responsibility for participants in the Jun ior Year Abroad Programs. The su per vi sion of the director and responsibility of Smith Col lege ends with the close of the ac a dem ic year. To be eligible to apply, students must have a mini-mum cumulative grade point average of 3.0 (B), a declared major and a min i mum of two years of college-level instruction in the appropriate lan guage be fore they can be considered for selection to spend the year abroad. All pro spec tive can di dates are urged to seek ad vice, be- gin ning in their first year, con cern ing the best se quence of courses in the language of the country in which they wish to study. Students who spend the junior year abroad may apply for ad mis sion to the hon ors program at the beginning of the senior year. Each year, interested students for the Junior Year Abroad programs are chosen by a selection com mit tee,

which reviews the applications in detail. The se lec tion process is competitive. Participants are se lect ed from both Smith College and other col leg es. All ap pli ca tions for the Smith Col lege Jun ior Year Abroad Pro grams, in clud ing rec om men da tions, must be filed with the Office for In ter na tion al Study by Feb ru ary 1. If a student should withdraw from a Junior Year Abroad Program during the course of the year, it is col-lege policy not to grant credit for less than a full year’s work and to refund only those payments for board and room which may be re cov ered by the college. Tuition charges for the year are not refundable. Normally, students who with draw from a Junior Year Abroad Pro-gram are withdrawn from Smith and may not return to the college the following semester.

Florence The year in Florence begins with three weeks of in ten -sive work in the Italian language. Classes in art history, literature and history are offered dur ing orientation as prep a ra tion for the more spe cial ized work of the ac a -dem ic year. The stu dents are matriculated at the Uni-versita di Firenze, to geth er with Italian students. Stu- dents may elect courses offered es pe cial ly for Smith by uni ver si ty professors at the Smith Center, as well as the reg u lar uni ver si ty cours es. Thus, a great variety of sub- jects is avail able in ad di tion to the tra di tion al cours es in art history, lit er a ture and history; other fields of study include music, re li gion, gov ern ment, phi los o phy and com par a tive literature. The students live in private homes se lect ed by the col lege. Since class es in Florence are conducted entirely in Italian, students are ex pect ed to have an excellent command of the lan guage. Two years or more of college-level Italian and a 3.0 GPA are required for possible admission into the program.

GenevaThe year in Geneva is international in ori en ta tion and offers unique opportunities to students of govern-ment, economics, economic history, Eu ro pe an history, international relations, com par a tive literature, French studies, anthropology, psy chol o gy, so ci ol o gy, history of art, and religion. Students are fully matriculated at the Université de Geneve and may take courses at its as so -ci ate institutes as well, where the present and past roles of Geneva as a center of international or ga ni za tion are con scious ly fos tered. Exceptional op por tu ni ties in clude in tern ships in international organizations, the faculty of psychology and ed u ca tion that con tin ues the work of Jean Piaget, and the rich hold ings of the mu se ums of Geneva in Western and Oriental art.

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The Academic Program 15

Students in the program attend a preliminary three-week session of intensive language training in Geneva, beginning in September. The academic year in Geneva begins in mid-September and continues until early July. Since class es in Geneva are conducted in French, students are expected to have an excellent com mand of the language. For prerequisites, see the re quire ments for study abroad under French Stud ies. Also, a 3.0 GPA is required for possible admission into the program.

HamburgThe academic year in Germany consists of two semes-ters (winter semester from mid-October to mid-Febru-ary and summer semester from the be gin ning of April to mid-July) separated by a five-week vacation during which students are free to travel. The winter semester is preceded by a five-week orientation program in Hamburg providing language review, an introduction to current affairs and to the city of Hamburg, and ex-cursions to oth er plac es of interest in Germany. During the ac a dem ic year the students are fully matriculated at the Universität Hamburg. They attend regular courses offered by the university, special courses arranged by Smith and tutorials coordinated with the course work. The program is open to students in almost every major field of study, and a wide variety of courses is available, including art (stu dio and history), biology, economics, history, his to ry of science and technology, literature, math e mat ics, mu sic his to ry, philosophy, physics, psy- chol o gy, re li gion and sociology. Since classes in Ham-burg are con duct ed in German, students are expected to have an ex cel lent command of the language; nor- mal ly, four se mes ters of college Ger man are re quired for par tic i pa tion in the pro gram. A 3.0 GPA is also required for possible admission into the program. The program offers a one-semester study option for the spring semester. Interested students should consult with the German studies department or the Office for In-ternational Study for details and application deadlines.

ParisThe program in France begins with a three-week pe ri od devoted to intensive work in the lan guage, supplement-ed by courses, lec tures and ex cur sions. In mid-Septem-ber, each stu dent selects a pro gram of courses suited to her par tic u lar ma jor. A wide variety of dis ci plines can be pursued in the various branches of the Université de Paris; for ex am ple, art history at the Institut d’Art et d’Archéologie; his to ry, literature, philosophy, religion

and many oth er subjects at the Sorbonne (Paris IV or Paris VII). Courses at such in sti tu tions are sometimes supplemented by special tutorials. A few courses or seminars are arranged ex clu sive ly for Smith stu dents. The stu dents live in private homes se lect ed by the col-lege. Since class es in Paris are conducted in French, students are expected to have an ex cel lent command of the language. For pre req ui sites, see the requirements for study abroad un der French Studies. Also, a 3.0 GPA is required for possible admission into the program.

Smith Consortial and Approved Study Abroad ProgramsSmith consortial and other approved programs are in all regions of the world, including Latin Amer i ca, Asia, Africa, En glish-speaking countries, and coun tries in Eu rope not served by Smith pro grams. Smith consortial and ap proved study-abroad programs are se lec tive but generally open to students with a strong academic back ground and sufficient prep a ra tion in the lan guage and culture of the host coun try and a minimum GPA of 3.0. A list of consortial and ap proved programs is available from the Office for In ter na tion al Study along with the guide lines for study abroad. Students wishing to petition for ap prov al for a pro gram not approved by Smith must do so by the semester prior to the deadline for study abroad applications. Students should consult the Office for International Study for petition deadlines and procedures. Faculty at Smith advise students about study abroad course selection, and several academic depart-ments have a special affiliation with specific Smith consortial programs. Consult the Web page of the Office for International Study, www.smith. edu/studyabroad, for the complete list of consorital and approved pro-grams. Programs with a Smith consortial affiliation include the following:

Associated Kyoto Program (AKP)Smith is one of the 16 institutional sponsors of the yearlong AKP program in Japan and conducts the selection pro cess. Interested students should consult the faculty in East Asian languages and cultures and East Asian stud ies.

Programa de Estudios Hispanicos In Cordoba (PRESCHO)Smith is one of the sponsors of the semester or year-long program in Cordoba, Spain, and conducts the selection pro cess. In ter est ed students should consult faculty in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

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16 The Academic Program

South India Term Abroad (SITA)Smith is one of the sponsors of this fall, spring or year-long semester program. In ter est ed students should consult the Office for In ter na tion al Study.

Program for Mexican Culture and Society in Puebla (PMCSP)This semester or yearlong residential study program is offered in collaboration with the Benemérita Univer-sidad Autónoma de Puebla (BUAP), one of Mexico’s leading public universities. It offers an extensive and strong focus in the humanities and social sciences. Smith conducts the selection process. Interested students should consult faculty in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

Off-Campus Study Programs in the U.S.Jean Picker Semester-in-Washington ProgramThe Department of Government offers the Jean Picker Semester-in-Washington Program during the fall semester to provide juniors and seniors in gov ern ment or related majors an opportunity to study the process by which public policy is made and implemented at the national level. The pro gram is described in detail on page 253. Students participating in this program are not considered to be in residence at Smith College.

Internship at the Smithsonian InstitutionThe American Studies Program offers a one-semester internship at the Smithsonian Institution in Wash ing ton, D.C. Under the supervision of out stand ing scholars, qualified students may examine some of the finest collections of materials relating to the develop-ment of culture in America. The pro gram is described in detail on page 79. Students participating in this program are not considered to be in residence at Smith College.

Twelve College Exchange ProgramSmith College participates in an exchange pro gram with the following colleges: Amherst, Bowdoin, Con-necticut, Dartmouth, Mount Holyoke, Trinity, Vassar,

Wellesley, Wesleyan and Wheaton. The exchange is open to a limited num ber of stu dents with a minimum 3.0 average and is intended primarily for the junior year. Normally, students participating in the pro gram may not trans fer to the host institution at the end of their stay there. Stu dents should be aware that the member colleges may limit or eliminate their partici-pation in the exchange in any par tic u lar year, due to space con straints. A lim it ed pool of financial aid is available for stu dents studying in the Twelve College Exchange. In ter -na tion al students may apply for the exchange; how ev er, Smith financial aid does not carry to the host institution. One-semester programs associated with the Twelve College Exchange are the National Theater Institute in Waterford, Connecticut, sponsored by Connecticut College, and the Williams–Mystic Sea port Program in American Maritime Studies, in Mys tic, Connecticut, sponsored by Williams College. Students accepted into the program are ex pect ed to pay the fees set by the host institution and to comply with the financial, social and ac a dem ic regulations of that institution. The course of study to be followed at the host institution must have the approval of the stu-dent’s major adviser at Smith College. All grades earned through exchange programs are recorded on the Smith transcript but are not included in the Smith GPA and therefore are not included in the calculation of honors. Application forms are available in the class deans’ office.

Pomona-Smith ExchangeThe college participates in a one-to-one student ex-change with Pomona College in Claremont, Cal i for nia. Sophom*ores and juniors in good standing, with a minimum 3.0 (B) average, are eligible to apply. Appli-cations are available in the class deans’ office.

Spelman-Smith ExchangeThe college participates in a one-to-one student exchange with Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia. Sophom*ores and juniors in good standing, with a minimum 3.0 (B) average, are eligible to apply. Appli-cations are available in the class deans’ office.

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Smith’s 147-acre campus is a place of physi-cal beauty and interesting people, ideas and events. Students enjoy fine facilities and services in a stimulating environment. We continually improve our li brary and

museum hold ings, which are al ready among the fin-est in the country, and upgrade our equip ment to give students here every tech no log i cal advantage. Smith attracts faculty members and students who are intellectually energetic and highly mo ti vat ed. To-gether, we form a community with diverse talents and interests, skills and training, and re li gious, cultural, political, geographic and so cio eco nom ic backgrounds. Many groups, activities and events arise from our broad range of interests. Mem bers of the Five College community are wel come in classes and at most cam-pus events. Their participation expands even further the per spec tives and experiences we represent. All undergraduate students at Smith are part of the Student Government Association, which sup ports approximately 100 student organizations and their projects and programs. These or ga ni za tions en rich the lives of their participants and of the gen er al com-munity through a wealth of con certs, pre sen ta tions, lectures, readings, movies, work shops, symposia, exhibits and plays that en hance the rhythm of campus life. Academic and ad min is tra tive departments and committees, re source cen ters, individual faculty mem-bers and alumnae also contribute to the already full sched ule. The pace and style of campus life vary greatly, as each woman creates the academic and social lifestyle best suited to her taste. Daily campus life includes periods both of great activity and move ment and of quiet and intense concentration. There is time for hard work, for listening and speak ing, for learning and teaching and for friends, fun and relaxation. The extracurricular social, athletic and cultural events on campus, in Northampton, and in the Five College area keep this an exciting center of activity. Each student learns through the overwhelming choices open to her how to develop and sustain a pace of life that is bal-anced and fulfilling.

FacilitiesMuch of the daily campus activity at Smith occurs in the following centers.

Smith College LibrariesWith a collection of more than 1.4 million books, pe ri od i cals, mi cro forms, maps, scores, re cord ings, rare books, ar chives, manuscripts and com put er databases, the Smith Col lege Libraries rival many uni ver si ty li- brar ies. We are committed to providing un der grad u ates with first hand research op por tu ni ties not only through our extensive re sourc es but also through specialized services. We maintain open stacks, provide in di vid u al re search as sis tance, collaborate with faculty in teach ing classes on research tools and tech niques and bor row ma te ri als from other libraries worldwide through our interlibrary loan service. The libraries’ Web page (www.smith.edu/li brar ies) links students to the Five College Library cat a log, with the holdings of Smith, Amherst, Mount Holyoke and Hampshire colleges and the Uni- ver si ty of Massachusetts at Amherst, to general and subject databases, and to full-text resources. The William Allan Neilson Library, named after Smith’s third president, serves as the main social sciences and humanities library and includes the library administrative offices. On the third floor, the Mortimer Rare Book Room showcases nearly 40,000 printed books in all subjects from the 15th through 20th centuries plus the Virginia Woolf and Sylvia Plath manuscript collections. The Rare Book Room is open to all un der grad u ates for brows ing and in-depth study of these spe cial ized materials. The Alumnae Gymnasium, connected to Neilson Library, houses the internationally renowned Sophia Smith Col lec tion, the oldest national repository for primary sources in women’s history; and the College Archives, which documents the history of Smith. Strong branch libraries help set Smith apart from other undergraduate colleges by providing specialized resources and services in specific sub ject areas. The three branches, described in sec tions below, are the

The Campus and Campus Life 17

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18 The Campus and Campus Life

Hillyer Art Library in the Brown Fine Arts Center, the Young Science Library in Bass Hall (Clark Science Cen-ter) and the Werner Josten Li brary for the Performing Arts in the Mendenhall Center.

Neilson Library hours (Academic Year) Monday–Thursday 7:45 a.m.–mid night Friday 7:45 a.m.–11 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m.–11 p.m. Sunday 10 a.m.–midnight

Hours vary during reading and exam periods, interses-sion, summer, vacations and holidays.

Clark Science CenterThe Clark Science Center is composed of six intercon-nected buildings housing eight academic de part ments (astronomy, biological sciences, chem is try, computer science, geology, math e mat ics, phys ics and psychol-ogy) and four programs (bio chem is try, engineering, environmental science and policy and neuroscience), with ap prox i mate ly 85 fac ul ty and 20 staff. The cen ter, which includes Bur ton, Sabin-Reed, McConnell and Bass halls, the tem po rary engineering building and Young Science Li brary, meets the most ex act ing spec i fi ca tions for modern sci en tif ic ex per i men ta tion and equipment. Science cen ter facilities in clude tra di tion al and com put er class rooms, sem i nar rooms, a large lec ture hall, a com- put er re source center, stu dent lab o ra to ries and faculty of fic es and research space. The educative mission in the sci enc es is sup port ed by an ad min is tra tive of fice, stock- room, tech ni cal shop, en vi ron men tal health and safety services, science inreach programming and an animal-care fa cil i ty. The Young Sci ence Li brary, a state-of-the-art science library and one of the larg est sci ence li brar ies at a liberal arts college in the United States, hous es more than 163,000 volumes, 22,500 mi cro forms, 700 pe ri od i cal sub scrip tions, and 154,000 maps, and provides a wide array of electronic resources including access to the Inter-net. Stu dent lab o ra to ries cus tom ar i ly en roll be tween 12 and 20 students and are faculty taught. Summer student research op por tu ni ties are available. Adjacent to the Clark Science Center are the Botanic Gardens and Lyman Plant House, with greenhouses illustrating a variety of climates. The campus grounds are an arboretum, with plants and trees labeled for easy identification.

Young Science Library hours (Academic Year) Monday–Thursday 7:45 a.m.–midnight Friday 7:45 a.m.–11 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m.–11 p.m. Sunday 10 a.m.–midnight

Hours vary during reading and exam periods, interses-sion, summer, vacations and holidays.

Brown Fine Arts CenterThe three portions of the Fine Arts Center serve different functions. Hillyer Hall, which houses the art depart-ment, is a center for the creative en deav ors of students and fac ul ty. Its studios for students of drawing, paint-ing, design, sculp ture, print-making and photography are supplemented by dark room facilities, faculty offices and classrooms. Hillyer Art Library houses collections of more than 110,000 volumes, 38,000 microforms, 250 current pe-riodicals, and a broad range of biliograph ic databases and full-text electronic re sourc es. The newly renovated art library facilities provide a variety of spaces for indi-vidual and group study with power and data connectiv-ity avail able at all seats. Tryon Hall is home to the Smith College Museum of Art, known as one of the nation’s out stand ing museums af fil i at ed with a college or uni ver si ty. Its collection, numbering approximately 24,000 objects, represents works dating from the 25th century B.C.E. to the present.

Art Library hours Monday–Thursday 9 a.m.–11 p.m. Friday 9 a.m.–9 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m.–9 p.m. Sunday noon–midnight

Hours vary during reading and exam periods, interses-sion, summer, vacations and holidays.

Museum hoursThe museum hours from July 1, 2007, through June 30, 2008, are as follows:Tuesday–Sunday, 10 a.m.–4 p.m.Sunday, noon–4 p.m.Closed Mondays and major holidays

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The Campus and Campus Life 19

Mendenhall Center for the Performing ArtsNamed for Thomas Mendenhall, president of the col-lege from 1959 to 1975, the Center for the Per form ing Arts celebrates music, theatre and dance. Three sides of the quadrangle were completed in 1968, joining Sage Hall to complete the college’s commitment to modern and comprehensive fa cil i ties for the performing arts. Berenson Studio for dancers accommodates both in-dividual and class instruction in two mirrored studios. The theatre building has extensive rehearsal space, shops and lounges that support productions in Theatre 14, which holds an audience of 458; the versatile Hallie Flanagan Studio Theatre, with its movable seats for 200; and the T.V. studio, which has flex i ble seating for 80. The Werner Josten Library welcomes students, making available more than 99,000 books and scores, 2,000 video recordings, 237 cur rent pe ri od i cal titles and 58,000 re cord ings to enjoy in com fort able read-ing rooms and in lis ten ing rooms for in di vid u als and groups. Sage Hall allows students to prac tice their music at one end and perform it in a gra cious 750-seat au di to ri um at the other. In be tween are faculty offices and class rooms. The Mendenhall Center for the Per- form ing Arts is crowned by a tower with a peal of eight bells hung for change ringing.

Werner Josten Library hours Monday–Thursday 8 a.m.–11 p.m. Friday 8 a.m.–9 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m.–9 p.m. Sunday noon–11 p.m.

Hours vary during reading and exam periods, interses-sion, summer, vacations and holidays.

Poetry CenterLocated on the first floor of Wright Hall, the Poetry Center is a bright, serene reading room, with a library that includes signed copies of books by all the poets who have visited Smith since 1997. It also features a rotating display, often including poetry materials bor-rowed from the Mortimer Rare Book Room. While the room mainly provides a space in which to read, write and meditate, it can also be reserved for appropriate events by Smith faculty, academic departments and administrative offices.

Reading room hours: Monday–Friday 8 a.m.–4 p.m. except when booked for events

Wright HallWright Hall supports many activities of learning in a variety of ways. The 400-seat Leo Weinstein Auditorium, the seminar rooms; the Wright Student Computer Center, comprising the Center for Foreign Lan guag es and Cultures and the Jahnige Social Science Research Center with 24 computer stations and more than 500 data sets; the Poetry Center and the 51 faculty offices draw students for formal class room study; for lectures and special pre sen ta tions; for informal discussions and for research.

Center for Foreign Languages and Cultures (CFLAC)The Center for Foreign Languages and Cultures main-tains a multimedia resource center (Wright Hall 7) and media classroom (Wright Hall 233), housing a network of student work sta tions with integrated computer, audio and video components for the study of foreign language, culture and literature. In the center, students may explore other cultures with the aid of interactive CDs and DVDs, digitized video and audio and CALL (com put er assisted language learning) programs. The center also supports exercises for more than 30 courses in 11 languages through QuickTime audio movies delivered via Moodle. Fac ul ty mem bers may re ceive as- sis tance at the center in eval u at ing com mer cial course-ware, in creating original in ter ac tive audio and video as well as CALL ma te ri als, or in or ga niz ing research projects in the field of sec ond lan guage acquisition.

Center Hours Monday–Thursday 8 a.m.–midnight Friday 8 a.m.–9 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m.–9 p.m. Sunday 10 a.m.–midnight

Information Technology ServicesInformation Technology Services’ academic fa cil i ties span the cam pus, with public computing labs in sev-eral build ings and a campuswide fiber-optic network al low ing computer access from all build ings and

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20 The Campus and Campus Life

res i den tial houses. Resources, which are con tin u al ly expanding, include more than 600 Windows and Mac-intosh computers used for word processing, graphics, nu mer i cal analysis, elec tron ic mail and access to the Internet; and nu mer ous UNIX computers, used for sta tis -ti cal anal y sis, com put er pro gram ming, electronic com- mu ni ca tions and other class assignments. In ad di tion, In for ma tion Technology Services ad min is ters the Smith Col lege Com put er Store, through which a student may pur chase a personal computer at a discounted price. There are no fees for the use of computers in the re source centers, but there is a small fee for printing. Smith stu- dents need to be enrolled in a course using com put ers to have ac cess to them. Students living on cam pus also have access to Smith’s computer re sourc es and the Inter-net through CyberSmith, the res i den tial house net work, and through a growing number of campus locations providing wireless access.

Office of Disability ServicesSmith College is committed both philosophically and legally to assuring equal access to all college programs and services. The college pursues the goal of equal access through proactive institutional planning and barrier removal, as well as through the provision of rea-sonable and appropriate accommodations to students, staff and faculty with documented disabilities. The Office of Disability Services coordinates accommoda-tions and facilitates the provision of services to students with documented disabilities. A student may voluntarily register with the Office of Disability Services by complet-ing the disability identification form and providing documentation of her disabilities, after which proper accommodations will be determined and implemented by the college.

Jacobson Center for Writing, Teaching and LearningThe Jacobson Center, located in Seelye 307, offers a variety of services and programs to help students develop skills in writing, quantitative reasoning, public speaking and effective learning. Professional writing counselors are available to review student drafts, point out strengths and weaknesses, and offer suggestions for improvement. Similar help is provided by student writing assistants in the evenings and on weekends. The quantitative skills counselor supports students in dealing with the quantitative content of a broad variety

of classes. The tutorial program provides help by match-ing students with master tutors in most sciences and languages, or peer tutors in all other subjects. In addi-tion, the center sponsors the Working Writers series on popular nonfiction, interterm courses on popular non-fiction, and interterm workshops on good writing. Lastly, the center houses a library of pedagogical resources and sponsors colloquia on teaching issues for faculty. These services are free and well utilized by Smith students, ranging from the first-year student in an introductory course to the senior completing an honors thesis. Full information on the Jacobson Center is avail-able at www.smith.edu/jacobsoncenter.

The Louise W. and Edmund J. Kahn Liberal Arts InstituteThe Kahn Liberal Arts Institute is an innovative institute that supports multidisciplinary, collaborative research at Smith College. Located on the third floor of the Neilson Library, the institute enhances intellectual life on the campus by bringing together students, faculty and distinguished visiting scholars to work on yearlong, multidisciplinary projects of broad scope. Each of these collaborative projects spawns a broad range of intellec-tual and artistic events that are open to the entire Smith College community, while providing the space and the resources for organized research colloquia for desig-nated groups of faculty and student fellows. In these intensive weekly meetings, Kahn fellows discuss and debate the issues and problems arising out of their com-mon research interests, generating a level of intellectual exchange that exemplifies the best of what a liberal arts education can offer. For more information, visit the Kahn Institute Web site at www.smith.edu/kahninstitute.

Athletic Facility ComplexJust as Alumnae Gymnasium was the “state of the art” gymnasium back in 1892 when women’s bas ket ball was first introduced, today’s four-building athletic com-plex is equally impressive. Scott Gym na si um is home to a dance studio, gymnasium, training room and the Human Performance Laboratory. Ainsworth Gymna-sium provides a swim ming pool with one- and three-meter diving boards, five international-sized squash courts, a fitness studio with a 24-foot-high climb ing wall and an in ter col le giate gym na si um. The in door track and tennis build ing, the site of three national NCAA track meets, in cludes four tennis courts and a 200-meter track resurfaced in February 2004.

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The Campus and Campus Life 21

The 6,500-plus square foot Olin Fitness Center features 40 pieces of aerobic machines, each with individual TV screens as well as 50-plus weight-lifting stations. The fa cil i ties of the sports com plex are aug- ment ed by 30 acres of ath let ic fields. Soc cer, la crosse, field hock ey, rugby and softball fields are encircled by a 3/4-mile cin der jogging track. For the serious run ner, there is a 400-meter all-weath er track, and for those who enjoy the peace ful solitude of a run through the woods, there is a 5,000-meter cross-country course. Equestrians can enjoy the indoor riding ring while the avid tennis com pet i tor will find the 12 lighted outdoor courts a pleasure. The boat house on Paradise Pond is home to the Smith Out doors Program and is open for nov ice row ers or ca noe pad dlers.

Ainsworth/Scott Gymnasium, Olin Fitness Center, and Indoor Track and Tennis Facility

Monday–Thursday 6 a.m.–10 p.m. Friday 6 a.m.–7 p.m. Saturday–Sunday 9 a.m.–5 p.m.

Campus CenterThe Campus Center is the community center of the college, providing services, programs and conveniences for all members of the Smith College community. The center provides space for informal socializing, reading and relaxing, and is a lively and dynamic atmosphere for activities and entertainment. Informal and formal meetings spaces, recreation and dining spaces, lounges, work space for student organizations, the college book-store, student mailboxes and a café are all housed in the center.

Campus Center Hours Monday–Thursday 7 a.m.–midnight Friday 7 a.m.–2 a.m. Saturday 9 a.m.–2 a.m. Sunday 9 a.m.–midnight

Student Residence HousesSmith is a residential college, and students are expected to reside on campus during their academic studies at Smith. Students live in 36 residence buildings with capacities of 12 to 102 students. The houses range in architectural style from modern to Gothic to classic revival. Each house has a comfortable living room, a study or library, and laundry facilities. Students at all

levels, from first-years to seniors, live together in each house, advising, supporting and sharing interests with one another. Smith provides many dining options and plenty of variety, including vegetarian and vegan meals. The 15 dining rooms offer different menus, themes and types of food, and no matter which house a student lives in, she may choose to eat wherever she wishes. A variety of specialty living options are also available for students: two cooperative houses and apartments for Ada Comstock Scholars and returning students provide alternative living arrangements. A small cooperative house and an apartment complex for a limited number of juniors and seniors offer additional alternative living arrangements to students.

Intercollegiate Athletics, Recreation and Club SportsA three-tier system of intercollegiate athletics, recre-ational activities and club sports provides satisfying and successful experiences that will develop in the Smith student a desire to participate in activity reg u lar ly throughout life. Our broad-based athletic program invites students to participate on one of 14 intercol-legiate teams. Recreational activities provide fitness opportunities as well as special events, while our club sports in tro duce training in several sports. Visit www.smith.edu/athletics/facilities for a current listing of activities and opportunities.

Smith OutdoorsSmith Outdoors is the outdoor adventure program offered through Smith’s athletics department. Based out of the Paradise Pond boathouse, Smith Outdoors offers a variety of clinics, presentations and off-campus trips throughout the year. The focus is on providing an outdoor setting for recreation, socialization, self-em-powerment and education. Activities vary from foliage hikes and ice-skating to more adventurous trips like rock climbing, backpacking and whitewater rafting. Also included are open hours for recreational paddling on Paradise Pond and rock climbing at the indoor climbing wall located in Ainsworth Gym. For more information, send e-mail to [emailprotected] or visit the Web site at www.smith.edu/athletics/club-sports/smithoutdoors.html.

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22 The Campus and Campus Life

Career DevelopmentThe Career Development Office provides as sis tance to students and alumnae preparing for changing career en vi ron ments and climates. We work with Smith wom-en to help them develop global and personal foresight so that they can direct the change in their lives. Our professional staff offers advising, both individu-ally and in groups, and our services are available 52 weeks a year. We hold sem i nars, work shops and panel discussions that cover in tern ships, industry panels, career choice and decision making, résumé writ ing, in ter view ing and job search tech niques, alum nae net- work ing, career presentations, applying to grad u ate and pro fes sion al schools, and summer jobs. We teach stu-dents how to assess their individual interests, strengths and weaknesses; how to es tab lish pri or i ties and make decisions; and how to present them selves effectively. Our ex ten sive career resource library and Web site support students in their research. The CDO is a service that allows students to trans late their academic and extra-curricular pur suits and their hopes and expectations into fruitful plans. We also sup-port alumnae as they undertake their plans and ask them to sup port the students yet to come by participat-ing as in for mal advisers in the Alumnae Career Advising Ser vice. Students and alumnae are en cour aged to visit the CDO home page at www.smith.edu/cdo for updated calendar and career resource con nec tions. Check us out. See the possibilities for your future.

Praxis Summer Internship Funding Program“Praxis: The Liberal Arts at Work,” administered through the Career Development Office, funds stu dents to work at substantive, unpaid summer in tern ships related to their academic and/or career interests. By of-fering financial support, the college acknowledges the importance of internships in helping students explore careers, observe the prac ti cal applications of their aca-demic studies, and gain work experience that enhances their mar ket abil i ty to employers and graduate schools. Since the majority (about 70 percent) of internships are un paid, Praxis stipends are intended to make it fi nan cial ly possible for students to work at sub stan tive sum mer internships. Praxis funding is a one-time op por tu ni ty. A student may use a Praxis sti pend for an approved internship in the summer following her sophom*ore or junior year. CDO staff and re sourc es offer guidance and assistance to students in lo cat ing

opportunities that meet their individual in ter ests. Proposed internships are re viewed by a mem ber of the faculty and by CDO staff. Each year ap prox i mate ly 500 stu dents work at sum mer internships funded through Prax is.

Health Serviceswww.smith.edu/healthHealth Services provides med i cal and psy cho log i cal services for all Smith stu dents. Through outpatient ser vic es lo cat ed in the Elizabeth Mason Infirmary, stu-dents see phy si cians, nurse practitioners and nurses for medical prob lems and questions, just as they would see their own providers at home. For psy cho log i cal issues, students see social workers, clinical nurse specialists and grad u ate social work interns. A psychiatrist is also available. Health education is provided on relevant topics.

Health ServiceThe same standards of confidentiality apply to the doc-tor-patient relationship at Smith as to all other medical practitioners. We offer a full range of out pa tient services to our patient population, in clud ing gynecological exams and testing; nu tri tion coun sel ing; routine physi-cals for summer em ploy ment and graduate school; immunizations for trav el, flu and allergies; and on-site laboratory ser vic es. In case of unusual or serious illness, specialists in the Northampton and Springfield areas are available for consultation in addition to service provided at a nearby hospital.

Counseling ServiceThe Counseling Service provides con sul ta tion, in- di vid u al and group psychotherapy and psy chi at ric evaluation and medication. These services are strict ly confidential. The Counseling Service is avail able to all students, free of charge. It is staffed by li censed mental health professionals and su per vised graduate in terns.

College Health InsuranceThe college offers its own insurance policy, un der -writ ten by an insurance company, that cov ers a student in the special circ*mstances of a res i den tial college. It extends coverage for in- and out pa tient services not covered by many other insurance plans. However, this policy does have some dis tinct limitations. Therefore, we strongly urge that stu dents hav ing a pre-existing or

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The Campus and Campus Life 23

re cur ring med i cal or psychiatric condition continue their precollege health insurance. A student elect ing to waive the college insurance plan must do so be fore the be gin ning of the first semester and must give her mem ber ship number and the name and address of the insurance carrier to the treasurer’s office. Fail ure to do so will result in automatic enrollment in the college health plan. We maintain certain regulations in the in ter est of community health as outlined in the col lege hand book and expect all students to com ply. Be fore ar riv ing at the college, each student must complete her Health Pre-Admission Information Form and send it to the Health Ser vic es. It is im por tant to note that Massachusetts law now mandates that students must get the required im- mu ni za tions before reg is tra tion. Stu dents ac cept ed for a Junior Year Abroad Pro gram or who plan to participate in in ter col le giate sports or cer tain exercise and sport pro grams may be required to have a physical exam by a col lege prac ti tio ner first.

Religious ExpressionThe dean of religious life encourages and develops the many expressions of spirituality, religious faith, and ethical reflection that characterize a diverse community like Smith’s. Assisting the dean are the chaplains to the college and the director of voluntary services. The chaplains are dedicated to promoting a spirit of mutual respect and interfaith collaboration. They organize weekly gatherings in the Jewish, Muslim, Protestant, Buddhist, and Catholic traditions and act as liaisons and advisers to other religious groups on campus. They work to facilitate the activities of student religious organiza-tions on campus including: Om, the Hindu student organization; Al-Iman, the Muslim student organiza-tion; the Newman Association; the Protestant Ecumeni-cal Christian Church; several meditation groups; Smith Christian Fellowship; the Baha‘i Fellowship; the Episco-pal-Lutheran Fellowship; the Eastern Orthodox student group; the Unitarian student group and the Association of Smith Pagans. A multi-faith council of representa-tives of student religious organizations meets six times a year with the dean and chaplains to discuss the spiritual needs of students and how to foster a climate supportive of religious expression on campus. The chapel is home to a robust musical program as well. The College Choirs, the Handbell Choir, the

College Glee Club and many visiting musical groups as well as faculty and staff musicians offer concerts and occasionally perform at worship services. The college organist uses the chapel’s Aolian-Skinner organ for teaching as well as performances. The college recognizes that meals are an important part of religious observance and practice for some stu-dents. Kosher and halal meals are available to students in the Cutter-Ziskind dining room. The student co-op in Dawes House prepares a kosher Shabbat meal and community gathering each week. In addition, religious holidays such as Ramadan, Passover, Easter and Diwali are often marked with lively celebrations open to the whole campus. The director of voluntary services and Service Or-ganizations of Smith (S.O.S.) provide long- and short-term community service opportunities and internships with local agencies. College policy states that any student who is un-able because of religious observances to attend classes or to participate in an examination, study or work on a particular day will be excused from such activities without prejudice and will be given an opportunity to make them up, provided such make-up examinations or work does not create an unreasonable burden on the college. No fees will be charged for rescheduling an examination.

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The Student BodySummary of Enrollment, 2006–07Undergraduate Students Ada Class of Class of Class of Class of Comstock 2007 2008 2009 2010 Scholars Totals

Northampton area1 645 444 631 686 134 2,540Not in residence 24 226 10 0 2 262

Five College course enrollments at Smith: First semester 480 Second semester 625

Graduate Students Full-time Part-time degree candidates degree candidates Special students

In residence 54 23 8

Smith students studying in off-campus programs

Florence Geneva Hamburg Paris

Smith students 24 7 10 23guest students 0 3 1 0

1. Guest students are included in the above counts.

In accordance with the Student Right-To-Know and Campus Security Act, the graduation rate for students who entered Smith College as first-year students in September 2000 was 86 percent by May 2006. (The period covered is equal to 150 percent of the normal time for graduation.)

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The Student Body 25

Geographical Distribution of Students by Residence, 2006–07

United StatesAlabama 8Alaska 6Arizona 19Arkansas 3California 243Colorado 22Connecticut 142Delaware 6District of Columbia 15Florida 48Georgia 21Hawaii 10Idaho 2Illinois 45Indiana 18Iowa 7Kansas 9Kentucky 14Louisiana 3Maine 68Maryland 59Massachusetts 583Michigan 24Minnesota 37Mississippi 4Missouri 17Montana 5Nebraska 2Nevada 2New Hampshire 70New Jersey 132New Mexico 15New York 344North Carolina 20Northern Mariana Islands 1Ohio 41Oklahoma 8Oregon 19Pennsylvania 105Puerto Rico 2Rhode Island 17South Carolina 8Tennessee 11Texas 58Utah 8Vermont 64

Virgin Islands 1Virginia 36Washington 55West Virginia 2Wisconsin 21Wyoming 2

Foreign CountriesAfghanistan 2Austria 1Bahrain 1Bangladesh 5Belarus 1Bolivia 3Bosnia-Herzegovina 2Botswana 3Brazil 2Bulgaria 3Canada 13Cayman Islands 1Costa Rica 2Czech Republic 1Denmark 1Ecuador 1England 2Ethiopia 1Finland 1France 2Germany 7Ghana 4Greece 3Grenada 1Guatemala 2Hong Kong 2India 10Israel 1Italy 1Jamaica 1Japan 10Kazakhstan 1Kenya 2Lesotho 1Malaysia 1Mauritius 1Moldova 1Morocco 1Myanmar 1

Nepal 2Netherlands 2Nicaragua 1Nigeria 1Norway 2Pakistan 12Paraguay 1People’s Republic of China 17Philippines 1Republic of Korea (South) 41Romania 3Saint Lucia 1Saudi Arabia 1Senegal 1Singapore 2Slovakia 1South Africa 1Spain 1Sri Lanka 1Switzerland 3Syria 1Taiwan 7Thailand 1Tunisia 1Turkey 3Uganda 2Ukraine 1United Arab Emirates 2United Kingdom 4Uzbekistan 1Venezuela 1Vietnam 6Zimbabwe 2

* This includes Ada Comstock Scholars and graduate students who move to Northampton for the purpose of their education.

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26 The Student Body

Class of 2007 Class of Ada Comstock (Seniors) (Honors) 2008 Scholars Totals

Government 64 5 71 4 144Art Art: History 29 2 31 2 64 Art: Studio 13 3 25 4 45 Art: Architecture & Urbanism 9 0 10 1 20Psychology 58 4 53 3 118Economics 51 2 48 5 106English Language & Literature 48 4 44 5 101American Studies 35 4 24 5 68Biological Sciences 19 6 32 1 58History 28 2 19 2 51Sociology 20 0 26 4 50Anthropology 24 1 20 4 49Neuroscience 20 2 26 0 48Mathematics 24 0 20 1 45Study of Women and Gender 23 0 19 2 44Engineering 19 6 15 0 40Education & Child Study 18 1 16 5 40Italian Studies 6 0 19 0 25 Italian Language & Literature 5 1 6 0 12Spanish 19 0 11 1 31 Portuguese-Brazilian Studies 1 0 4 0 5Theatre 17 0 17 0 34French Studies 17 1 12 0 30Biochemistry 11 2 10 2 25Religion 12 0 4 0 16Religion & Biblical Literature 2 0 3 0 5Philosophy 11 1 9 0 21Afro-American Studies 8 1 10 1 20Computer Science 7 1 11 0 19Classical Languages and Literatures Classical Studies 2 0 8 0 10 Classics 3 1 4 0 8Geology 5 4 7 2 18Chemistry 4 4 10 0 18East Asian Languages & Culture 9 0 9 0 18Liberal Studies 9 0 4 4 17Comparative Literature 7 0 8 0 15Latin American Studies 9 2 4 0 15Film Studies 7 0 8 0 15Music 5 0 9 0 14German Studies 5 1 7 0 13Russian Language and Literature Russian Literature 4 0 3 0 7 Russian Civilization 1 0 4 0 5East Asian Studies 3 0 6 0 9Dance 3 0 5 1 9Physics 6 0 2 0 8Medieval Studies 2 1 4 0 7Astronomy 2 1 2 0 5Logic 0 1 2 0 3African Studies 0 0 2 0 2Sociology & Anthropology 2 0 0 0 2Jewish Studies 0 0 1 0 1Middle Eastern Studies 1 0 0 0 1International Political Economy 0 0 1 0 1Indo-Tibetan Studies 1 0 0 0 1Sustainable Design 0 0 1 0 1Cognitive Science 1 0 0 0 1

Majors

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27

Recognition forAcademic Achievement

Academic AchievementsEach year approximately 25 percent of the graduating class is awarded the bachelor of arts degree with Latin Honors and/or departmental honors.

Latin HonorsLatin Honors are awarded to eligible graduating seniors on the basis of the cumulative grade point average for a minimum of 48 graded credits earned during the sophom*ore, junior and senior years. Only grades from Smith College courses and courses taken on the Five College Interchange are counted; Smith Junior Year Abroad grades are considered Smith grades. No grades from exchange programs in this country or abroad are counted. Pluses and minuses are taken into account; grades of P/F (Pass or Fail) or S/U (Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory) do not enter into the calculations. If a student spends one of her sophom*ore through senior years away from Smith (with the exception of the Smith Junior Year Abroad Program), the grades from the remaining two years will be used. Grades from the first year are never counted. The minimum grade point average for Latin Honors varies each year depend-ing on the overall grade distribution in the senior class and is not published. The degree may be awarded cum laude, magna cum laude or summa cum laude on the basis of meeting eligibility requirements and of a very high level of academic achievement. Students who wish to become eligible for Latin Honors at graduation must elect at least one course (normally four credits) in each of the seven major fields of knowledge listed on pp. 7–8 (applies to those students who began at Smith in September 1994 or later and who graduate in 1998 or later). Course list-ings in this catalogue indicate in curly brackets which area(s) of knowledge a given course covers (see p. 65 for a listing of the designations used for the major fields of knowledge). Please note that one year of an introductory language course or one course at a higher level satis-

fies the foreign language Latin Honors requirement. Students who are non-native speakers of English may, with the permission of a class dean, offer any two courses in the English department at the 100 level (or one course at a higher level in the English department, the comparative literature program or in classics in translation) to satisfy the “foreign language” part of the Latin Honors requirement. The class dean will notify the registrar that such an arrangement has been approved. Any appeals should be sent to the dean of the faculty. Non-native speakers of English are considered to be those who indicated on their advising form that English was not their first language, have had several years of education in a school where the language of instruction was other than English, and can read, write and speak this language.

Departmental HonorsA departmental honors program allows a student with a strong academic background to do independent and original work in her major. The program provides recognition for students who do work of high quality in the preparation of a thesis and in courses and semi-nars. See page 12. Departmental honors students must also fulfill all college and departmental require-ments. Successful completion of work in the honors program (an honors thesis and at least one honors examination) leads to the awarding of the bachelor of arts degree with the added notation “Honors,” “High Honors” or “Highest Honors” in the student’s major subject.

First Group ScholarsStudents whose records for the previous year include at least 28 credits graded A– or better and who have no grades below B– are named First Group Scholars. Those named generally represent the top 10 percent of the class.

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28 Recognition for Academic Achievement

The Dean’s ListThe Dean’s List for each year names those students whose total records for the previous academic year aver-age 3.333 or above and include at least 24 credits for traditional-aged undergraduates or 16 credits for Ada Comstock Scholars. Students must be enrolled at Smith for the full year to be named to the Dean’s List.

Society of the Sigma XiIn 1935 Smith College became the first women’s col-lege to be granted a charter for the establishment of a chapter of the Society of the Sigma Xi. Each year the Smith College Chapter elects to membership promising graduate students and seniors who excel in science.

Phi Beta KappaThe Zeta of Massachusetts Chapter of the Phi Beta Kap-pa Society was established at Smith College in 1905. Rules of eligibility are established by the chapter in accordance with the regulations of the national society. Selection is made on the basis of overall academic achievement. Elections are held twice a year. In the autumn, a few seniors are elected on the basis of their academic records from the sophom*ore and junior years. Sixty-four credits must be in the calculation of the GPA. Only Smith, Five College and Smith Junior Year Abroad grades count. At the end of the spring semester, more seniors are elected, these on the basis of the records from their final three years. Candidates for election in the autumn of the senior year must have completed at least one four-credit se-mester course in each of the three divisions; candidates at the end of the senior year must have completed at least two such courses in each division. Non-Smith courses may qualify in this distribution requirement. For students who enter Smith College in September 1994 or later, and who graduate in 1998 or later, the distribution requirements for Phi Beta Kappa will be precisely the same as the college’s requirements for Latin Honors. Candidates for election in the autumn of the senior year will have to have completed the identical distribution requirements by the end of the junior year. Students and faculty may consult with the president or the secretary of the chapter for more information.

Psi ChiThe Smith College Chapter of Psi Chi was established in 1975. Students majoring or minoring in psychology who demonstrate academic excellence in both that field and their overall program of study are inducted into this national honor society. According to the char-ter, those honored are enjoined to develop programs that enhance student opportunity to explore the field of psychology.

Prizes and AwardsThe following prizes are awarded at the Last Chapel Awards Convocation on Ivy Day.

The Anne Bradstreet Prize from the Academy of American Poets for the best poem or group of poems submitted by an undergraduate

An award from the Connecticut Valley Section of the American Chemical Society to a student who has done outstanding work in chemistry

The American Chemical Society/Division of Analyti-cal Chemistry Award to a junior chemistry major who has excelled in analytical chemistry

The American Chemical Society/Polymer Education Division Organic Chemistry Award for Achievement in Organic Chemistry to a student majoring in chem-istry who has done outstanding work in the organic chemistry sequence

An award from The American Institute of Chemists/New England Division to an outstanding chemist or chemical engineer in the graduating class

The Newton Arvin Prize in American Studies for the best long paper in the introductory course on the study of American Society and Culture

The Anita Luria Ascher Memorial Prize to a senior non-major who started German at Smith and has made exceptional progress; to a senior major who start-ed German at Smith, has taken it for four years and made unusual progress; and to a student who knew some German when she arrived at Smith and whose progress in four years has been considerable

The Elizabeth Babco*ck Poetry Prize for the best group of poems

The Sidney Balman Prize for outstanding work in the Jewish Studies Program

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Recognition for Academic Achievement 29

The Harriet Dey Barnum Memorial Prize for out-standing work in music to the best all-around student of music in the senior class

The Gladys Lampert ’28 and Edward Beenstock Prize for the best honors thesis in American studies or American history

The Suzan Rose Benedict Prize to a sophom*ore for excellence in mathematics

The Samuel Bowles Prize for the best paper on an anthropological subject

The Samuel Bowles Prize for the best paper in eco-nomics

The Samuel Bowles Prize for the best paper on a so-ciological subject

The Kathleen Bostwick Boyden Prize awarded to a member of the Service Organizations of Smith who has demonstrated the best initiative in her volunteer contri-butions to the Smith College community

The John Everett Brady Prize for excellence in the translation of Latin at sight; and for the best perfor-mance in the beginning Latin course

The Margaret Wemple Brigham Prize to a senior for excellence in the study of microbiology or immunology

The Amey Randall Brown Prize awarded for the best essay on a botanical subject

The Vera Lee Brown Prize for excellence in history to a senior majoring in history in regular course

The Yvonne Sarah Bernhardt Buerger Prize to the students who have made the most notable contribution to the dramatic activities of the college

The David Burres Memorial Law Prize to a senior or an alumna accepted at law school intending to practice law in the public interest

The C. Pauline Burt Prize to a senior majoring in chemistry or biochemistry who has an excellent record and who has shown high potential for further study in science

The James Gardner Buttrick Prize for the best essay in the field of religion and biblical literature

The Marilyn Knapp Campbell Prize to the student excelling in stage management

The Michele Cantarella Memorial “Dante Prize” to a Smith College senior for the best essay in Italian on any aspect of The Divine Comedy

The Carlile Prize for the best original composition for carillon; and for the best transcription for carillon

The Esther Carpenter Biology Prize in general biol-ogy to a first-year woman graduate student

The Julia Harwood Caverno Prize for the best perfor-mance in the beginning Greek course

The Eleanor Cederstrom Prize for the best poem by an undergraduate written in traditional verse form

The Césaire Prize for excellence in an essay or other project in French by a junior or senior on campus

The Sidney S. Cohen Prize for outstanding work in the field of economics

The Susan Cohen ’62 and Paula Deitz ’59 Prize in Landscape Studies for excellence in a thesis, paper or project that examines the science, design or culture of the built environment

The Ethel Olin Corbin Prize to an undergraduate for the best original poem or informal essay in English

The CRC Press Introductory Chemistry Achievement Award in introductory chemistry

The Merle Curti Prize for the best piece of writing on any aspect of American civilization

The Dawes Prize for the best undergraduate work in political science

The Alice Hubbard Derby Prize to a member of the junior or senior class for excellence in the translation of Greek at sight; and to a member of the junior or se-nior class for excellence in the study of Greek literature in the year in which the award is made

The George E. Dimock Prize for the best essay on a classical subject submitted by a Smith College under-graduate

The Elizabeth Drew Prize in the Department of English Language and Literature for the best fiction writing; for the best honors thesis; for the best first-year student essay on a literary subject; and for the best classroom essay

The Hazel L. Edgerly Prize to a senior honors history student for distinguished work in that subject

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30 Recognition for Academic Achievement

The Constance Kambour Edwards Prize to the stu-dent who has shown the most progress during the year in organ

The Ruth Forbes Eliot Poetry Prize for the best poem submitted by a first-year or sophom*ore

The Samuel A. Eliot Jr./Julia Heflin Award for distin-guished directing in the theatre

The Settie Lehman Fatman Prize for the best composi-tion in music, in large form; and in small form

The Heidi Fiore Prize to a senior student of singing

The Eleanor Flexner Prize for the best piece of work by a Smith undergraduate using the Sophia Smith Collection and the Smith College Archives

The Harriet R. Foote Memorial Prize for outstanding work in botany based on a paper, course work, or other contribution to the plant sciences at Smith

The Henry Lewis Foote Memorial Prize for excel-lence in course work in biblical courses

The Clara French Prize to a senior who has advanced furthest in the study of English language and literature

The Helen Kate Furness Prize for the best essay on a Shakespearean theme

The Nancy Boyd Gardner Prize for an outstanding paper or other project in American studies by a Smith-sonian intern or American studies major

The Ida Deck Haigh Memorial Prize to a student of piano for distinguished achievement in performance and related musical disciplines

The Sarah H. Hamilton Memorial Prize awarded for an essay on music

The Arthur Ellis Hamm Prize awarded on the basis of the best first-year record

The Vernon Harward Prize awarded annually to the best student scholar of Chaucer

The James T. and Ellen M. Hatfield Memorial Prize for the best short story by a senior majoring in English

The Hause-Scheffer Memorial Prize for the senior chemistry major with the best record in that subject

The Hellman Award in Biochemistry for outstanding achievement in the second semester of biochemistry

The Nancy Hellman Prize, established in 2005, to the Smith engineering student who has made extraordi-

nary contributions to the advancement of women in engineering

The Ettie Chin Hong ’36 Prize to a senior majoring or minoring in East Asian Languages and Literatures who has demonstrated leadership and academic achieve-ment and who intends to pursue a career in education or service to immigrant and needy communities

The Denis Johnston Playwriting Award for the best play or musical written by an undergraduate at Am-herst, Hampshire, Mount Holyoke, or Smith colleges, or the University of Massachusetts

The Megan Hart Jones Studio Art Prize for judged work in drawing, painting, sculpture, photography, graphic arts or architecture

The Barbara Jordan Award to an African-American senior or alumna undertaking a career in law or public policy, after the example of Texas Congresswoman Barbara Jordan (1936–1996)

The Mary Augusta Jordan Prize, an Alumnae Associa-tion Award, to a senior for the most original piece of literary work in prose or verse composed during her undergraduate course

The Peggy Clark Kelley Award in theatre for a student demonstrating exceptional achievement in lighting, costume or set design

The Martha Keilig Prize for the best still life or land-scape in oils on canvas

The John and Edith Knowles Memorial Award to a student of outstanding merit who has elected to pursue a medical career and who has displayed qualities that might lead her to become a thoughtful and humane critic of her chosen profession

The Florence Corliss Lamont Prize, a medal awarded for work in philosophy

The Norma M. Leas, Class of 1930, Memorial Prize to a graduating English major for excellence in written English

The Phyllis Williams Lehmann Travel Award to a graduating senior majoring in art, with preference given to students interested in studying art history, especially classical art, at the graduate level

The Ruth Alpern Leipziger Award to an outstanding French major participating in the Junior Year Abroad Program in Paris

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Recognition for Academic Achievement 31

The Jill Cummins MacLean Prize to a drama major for outstanding dramatic achievement with a comic touch in writing, acting or dance

The Emogene Mahony Memorial Prize for the best essay on a literary subject written by a first-year student; and the best honors thesis submitted to the Department of English Language and Literature

The Emogene Mahony Memorial Prize for profi-ciency at the organ

The Jeanne McFarland Prize for excellent work in women’s studies

The John S. Mekeel Memorial Prize to a senior for outstanding work in philosophy

The Bert Mendelson Prize to a sophom*ore for excel-lence in computer science; and to a senior majoring in computer science for excellence in that subject

The Thomas Corwin Mendenhall Prize for an essay evolving from any history course, excluding special studies, seminars and honors long papers

The Samuel Michelman Memorial Prize, given in his memory by his wife, to a senior from Northampton or Hatfield who has maintained a distinguished academic record and contributed to the life of the college

The Mineralogical Society of America Undergradu-ate Award for excellence in the field of mineralogy

The Elizabeth Montagu Prize for the best essay on a literary subject concerning women

The Juliet Evans Nelson Award to graduating seniors for their contributions to the Smith community and demonstrated commitment to campus life

The Newman Association Prize for outstanding lead-ership, dedication and service to the Newman Associa-tion at Smith College

The Josephine Ott Prize, established in 1992 by for-mer students and friends, to a Smith junior in Paris or Geneva for her commitment to the French language and European civilization

The Adelaide Wilcox Bull Paganelli ’30 Prize award-ed by the physics department to honor the contribution of Adelaide Paganelli ’30, to a senior majoring in phys-ics with a distinguished academic record

The Arthur Shattuck Parsons Memorial Prize to the student with the outstanding paper in sociological theory or its application

The Adeline Devor Penberthy Memorial Prize, established in 2002 by the Penberthy family, to an undergraduate engineering major for her academic excellence in engineering and outstanding contribu-tions toward building a community of learners within the Picker Engineering Program

The Ann Kirsten Pokora Prize to a senior with a dis-tinguished academic record in mathematics

The Sarah Winter Pokora Prize to a senior who has excelled in athletics and academics

The Meg Quigley Prize for the best paper in the Intro-duction to Women’s Studies course

The Judith Raskin Memorial Prize for the outstand-ing senior voice student

The Elizabeth Killian Roberts Prize for the best draw-ing by an undergraduate

The Mollie Rogers/Newman Association Prize to a student who has demonstrated a dedication to human-ity and a clear vision for translating that dedication into service that fosters peace and justice among people of diverse cultures

The Rosenfeld Prize in Organic Chemistry for excel-lence in the first semester of organic chemistry

The Eleanor B. Rothman Prize to a graduating Ada Comstock Scholar who will pursue a graduate degree and who has shown an interest in the Ada Comstock Scholars Program and in Smith College

The Rousseau Prize for academic excellence to a member of the junior or senior class studying with the Smith College junior year abroad program in Geneva.

The Department of Russian Prize for the best essay on Russian literature by a senior majoring in Russian

The Victoria Louise Schrager Prize to a senior who has maintained a distinguished academic record and has also taken an important part in student activities

The Larry C. Selgelid Memorial Prize for outstanding work in the field of economics by a Smith senior

The Donald H. Sheehan Memorial Prize for out-standing work in American studies

The Rita Singler Prize for outstanding achievement in technical theatre

The Andrew C. Slater Prize for excellence in debate; and for most improved debater

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32 Recognition for Academic Achievement

The Denton M. Snyder Acting Prize to a Smith senior who has demonstrated distinguished acting in the theatre

The Deborah Sosland-Edelman Prize to a senior for outstanding leadership in the Jewish community at Smith and valuable contribution to Smith College campus life

The Gertrude Posner Spencer Prize for excellence in writing nonfiction prose; and for excellence in writing fiction

The Nancy Cook Steeper ’59 Prize to a graduating senior who, through involvement with the Alumnae Association, has made a significant contribution to building connections between Smith alumnae and current students The Valeria Dean Burgess Stevens Prize for excellent work in women’s studies

The William Sentman Taylor Prize for significant work in human values, a quest for truth, beauty and goodness in the arts and sciences

The Rosemary Thomas Poetry Prize for the best group of poems; and for the best individual poem

The Tryon Prize to a Smith undergraduate for the best piece of writing on a work or works of art at the Smith College Museum of Art; and for best installation, digital media or performance art inspired by a work of art or exhibition at the Smith College Museum of Art

The Ruth Dietrich Tuttle Prize to encourage further study, travel or research in the areas of international relations, race relations or peace studies

The Unity Award of the Office of Multicultural Affairs to the student who has made an outstanding contribu-tion toward promoting diversity and multiculturalism in the Smith College community

The Anacleta C. Vezzetti Prize to a senior for the best piece of writing in Italian on any aspect of the culture of Italy

The Voltaire Prize to a sophom*ore at Smith College for an essay or other project in French that shows original-ity and engagement with her subject

The Ernst Wallfisch Prize to a student of music for outstanding talent, commitment and diligence

The Louise M. Walton Prize to an Ada Comstock Scholar studying art history or studio art whose dedica-tion to the field is notable

The Frank A. Waterman Prize to a senior who has done excellent work in physics

The Jochanan H. A. Wijnhoven Prize for the best es-say on a subject in the area of Jewish religious thought written for a course in the Department of Religion and Biblical Literature or in the Program for Jewish Studies

The Enid Silver Winslow ’54 Prize in art history for the best student paper written in an art history course taught at Smith

FellowshipsMajor International and Domestic FellowshipsStudents with high academic achievement and strong community service or leadership experience are en-couraged to apply for international and domestic fel-lowships through the college. The Fellowships Program administers a support service for students applying for more than 15 different fellowships. There are at least eight graduate fellowships that the college supports. Six are for university study: Rhodes (Oxford), Marshall (Britain), Gates (Cambridge), Mitchell (Ireland and Northern Ireland) and DAAD (Germany). The Fulbright is for yearlong research, study or teaching in one of 120 countries and the Luce for a year interning in Asia. There are two further pres-tigious graduate fellowships for which students must apply in earlier undergraduate years: the Truman and the Beinecke. For undergraduates, the college facilitates inter-national opportunities through the Boren, DAAD and Killam fellowships in conjunction with its Study Abroad Program. Another undergraduate fellowship for which Smith offers sponsorship is the Udall for those inter-ested in preserving the environment. Fellowship information and application assistance for eligible candidates are available from the fellow-ships adviser in the Class Deans’ office.

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33

Fees, Expenses and Financial Aid

A Smith College education is a lifetime investment. It is also a financial challenge for many families. At Smith, we encourage all qualified students to apply for admis-sion, regardless of family financial resourc-

es. Our students come from a variety of socioeconomic backgrounds. The Office of Student Financial Services has an experienced staff to assist students and parents in both the individual financial aid application process and the educational financing process in general. We work with families to help them manage the financial challenge in a variety of ways, through financial aid, loans and payment plan options. Many Smith students receive financial assistance to pay for college expenses. Smith College participates in all the major federal and state student aid programs while funding a substantial institutional grant and scholarship program from its endowment We realize that financing a college education is a complex process, and we encourage applicants and their families to communicate directly with us. Our experienced educational financing staff in the Office of Student Financial Services is available to work with you. Inquiries may be made by calling (413) 585-2530 between 8:30 a.m. and 4 p.m. weekdays; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Wednesdays (Eastern time). Send e-mail com-munications to [emailprotected] or visit their Web site at www.smith.edu/finaid.

Your Student Account Smith College considers the student to be responsible for ensuring that payments—whether from loans, grants, parents, or third parties—are received in a timely man-ner. All student accounts are managed by the Office of Student Financial Services. Initial statements detail-ing semester fees are mailed on or about July 15 and December 15. Monthly statements will be mailed to the student’s permanent mailing address on or about the 15th of each month. The college’s comprehensive fees associated with the beginning of the semester are due and payable in full by specific deadline dates, well in advance of the beginning of classes. The payment deadline for fall

2007 is August 10, 2007. For spring 2008, the payment deadline is January 10, 2008. Payment must be made by these dates to avoid late payment fees being assessed. Checks should be made payable to Smith College and include the student’s name and ID number on the front. Beginning on the next business day after any pay-ment is due, monthly late payment fees, which are based on the outstanding balance remaining after any payment due date, will be assessed at the rate of $1.25 on every $100 (1.25%) that remains unpaid until the payment is received in full, on or before the next billing month in which the student is invoiced. If you have questions regarding any charges or credits on your bill, contact the Office of Student Financial Services. In cases where students default on financial obli-gations, the student is responsible for paying the out-standing balance including all late payment fees, col-lection costs and any legal fees incurred by the college during the collection process. Transcripts and other academic records will not be released until all financial obligations to the College have been met. IMPORTANT NOTE: Payments for each month’s bill must be received by the Office of Student Financial Services by the payment due date. If paying by mail, please allow at least 5 to 7 business days for mail and processing time. If paying in person, payment should be made before 4 p.m. on the payment due date. The college expects the student to fulfill her fi-nancial responsibility and reserves the right to place limitations on the student for failure to do so. The consequences of nonpayment include being prevented from participating in the house decision/room lottery process, registering for future semester courses, re-ceiving academic transcripts and receiving a diploma at commencement or approval for a leave of absence. The college also reserves the right to have the student administratively withdrawn and may refer such account for collection in her name. Students and parents are welcome to contact the Office of Student Financial Services for assistance in meeting payment responsibilities. Most credit balance refunds are issued directly by check in the student’s name; those that result from a

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34 Fees, Expenses and Financial Aid

PLUS or Parent MEFA loan are issued to the parent bor-rower. With the student’s written release, credit balance

2007–08 Comprehensive Fee (required institutional fees)

Fall Semester Spring Semester Total

Tuition $16,970 $16,970 $33,940

Room and Board* 5,710 5,710 11,420

Student activities fee 123 123 246

Comprehensive fee $22,803 $22,803 $45,606

* Room and board will be billed as a combined charge.

As part of her expenses, a student should be prepared to spend a minimum of $800 per year on books and academic supplies. In addition, a student will incur additional expenses during the academic year that will vary according to her standard of living, personal needs, recreational activities and number of trips home.

Fee for Nonmatriculated StudentPer credit ............................................................... $1,060

Fees for Ada Comstock ScholarsApplication fee ........................................................... $60Transient Housing (per semester) Room only (weekday nights) ........................... $380 Room and full meal plan (weekday nights) .............................................. $810Tuition per semester 1–7 credits ......................................$1,060 per credit 8–11 credits .................................................... $8,480 12–15 credits ................................................ $12,730 16 or more credits ........................................ $16,970

Student Activities FeeThe $246 student activities fee is split between the two semesters and is used to fund chartered student orga-nizations on campus. The Student Government As-sociation allocates the monies each year. Each spring, the Senate Finance Committee of the SGA proposes a budget that is voted on by the student body.

2007–08 Optional FeesStudent Medical Insurance—$2,054The $2,054 Student Medical Insurance fee is split between the two semesters and covers the student from August 15 through the following August 14. Massachu-setts law requires that each student have comprehensive health insurance; Smith College offers a medical insur-ance plan through Koster Insurance (www.kosterweb.com) for those students not otherwise insured. Details about the insurance are mailed during the summer. Students are automatically billed for this insurance unless they follow the waiver process outlined in the insurance mailing. Students must waive the insurance coverage by August 10 in order to avoid purchasing the annual Smith Plan. If a student is on leave on a Smith-approved program that is billed at home-school fees, a reduced charge may apply. The Student Health Insur-ance is mandatory for all students who are enrolled in the Smith JYA programs (Paris, Hamburg, Geneva, Florence). For students who are admitted for spring semester, the charge will be $1,324 for 2007–08.

Fees

refunds may be issued to the parent or the designee of the student.

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Fees, Expenses and Financial Aid 35

Other Fees and ChargesApplication for Admission—$60The application fee of $60, which helps defray the cost of handling the paperwork and administrative review of applications, must accompany a paper version of the application. The fee is waived if applying online.

Enrollment Deposit—$300Upon admittance, a new student pays an enrollment deposit which serves to reserve her place in class and a room if she will reside in campus housing. $100 repre-senting a general deposit component is held until six months after the student graduates from the college. The $100 is refunded only after deducting any unpaid fees or fines and is not refunded to a student who withdraws (including an admitted student who does not attend); $200 representing a room deposit compo-nent is credited $100 in July toward her fall semester charges; and $100 in December toward her spring semester charges.

Fee for Musical Instruction—$600 per semester (one-hour lesson per week) Practice rooms are available to Smith College students with first preference given to those registered for music instruction. Other Five College students may apply to the chair of the music department for permission to use the facilities. Practice rooms may be available for use by other individuals in last order of preference upon successful application to the chair of the music department. There is no charge for Five College students, faculty and staff for use of the practice rooms. For other indi-viduals, the following schedule of fees will apply. Use of a practice room, one hour daily .................................................................$25 per year

Fee for Riding Classes per SemesterAdjacent to the Smith campus is Fox Meadow Farm, where riding lessons are available to all students at the college. Fox Meadow Farm will also board horses for students, at a cost of $485 per month. Inquiries about boarding should be addressed to Sue Payne, c/o Smith College Riding Stables. The Smith intercollegiate rid-ing team uses their facilities for practice and for horse shows. The fees listed below are per semester and are payable directly to Fox Meadow Farm when a student registers for lessons each semester. Two lessons per week ..........................................$470

Studio Art Courses per SemesterCertain materials and supplies are required for studio art courses and will be provided to each student. Stu-dents may require additional supplies as well and will be responsible for purchasing them directly. The ex-penses will vary from course to course and from student to student. Required materials .................................... $20–$150 Additional supplies ..................................... $15–$100

Chemistry Laboratory Course per Semester .......................................................$25 plus breakage

Continuation Fee ......................................................... $60 per semesterStudents on leave of absence or attending other institu-tions on exchange or junior year abroad programs will be assessed a continuation fee to maintain enrollment status at the college.

Late Payment FeeAny payment made after August 10 for fall or January 10 for spring will be considered late. Late payments may be assessed a late fee at the rate of $1.25 on every $100 (1.25%).

Early Arrival Fee—$35 per Day

Late Central Check-In Fee—$60Returning students who do not participate in Central Check-In will be assessed a fee.

Late Registration Fee—$35Students who make registration changes after the regis-tration period will be assessed a fee for each change.

Bed Removal Fee—$100Students who remove their beds from their campus rooms will be charged a bed removal fee.

Health/Fire/Safety Violation—$5 per ItemA minimum fine of $5 per item will be charged for items left in public areas such as corridors, stairways or entrances. These items create a hazard and violate compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, as well as city and state building, fire, and safety codes.

Institutional Refund PolicyA refund must be calculated if a student has withdrawn on or after the first day of classes, but before the point when the college is considered to have earned all the

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36 Fees, Expenses and Financial Aid

tuition, room, board and mandatory fees (hereinafter called institutional charges) for which the student was charged. A withdrawal fee of $100 will be charged in addition to any refund calculation made. Credit bal-ances remaining on any account will be refunded to the appropriate person or agency.

Adjustment of Institutional Charges and Institutional AidAny student who withdraws prior to the first day of classes will receive a 100 percent adjustment of institu-tional charges and insurance. All disbursed Title IV aid, institutional aid, state and other aid will be returned to the appropriate account by the college. A student who withdraws after the first day of classes, but before the time when she will have com-pleted 60 percent of the period of enrollment, will have her institutional charges and institutional aid adjusted based on the percent of attendance. If a student should withdraw from a Junior Year Abroad Program during the course of the year, it is col-lege policy not to grant credit for less than a full year’s work and to refund only those payments for room and board which may be recovered by the college. Tuition charges for the year are not refundable. Normally, students who withdraw from a Junior Year Abroad Pro-gram are withdrawn from Smith and may not return to the college the following semester.

Students Receiving Title IV Federal AidPer federal regulations, a student earns her aid based on the period of time she remains enrolled. Unearned Title IV funds, other than Federal Work Study, must be returned to the appropriate federal agency. During the first 60 percent of the enrollment period, a student earns Title IV funds in direct proportion to the length of time she remains enrolled. A student who remains enrolled beyond the 60 percent point earns all the aid for the payment period. For example, if the period of enrollment is 100 days and the student completes 25 days, then she has earned 25 percent of her aid. The remainder of the aid must be returned to the appropri-ate federal agency.

Other ChargesIf a student has not waived the medical insurance and withdraws from the college during the first 31 days of the period for which coverage is purchased, she shall not be covered under the Plan and a full refund of the premium will be made. Insured students withdrawing after 31 days will remain covered under the Plan for the

full period for which the premium has been paid and no refund will be made available. Other charges, such as library fines, parking fines, and infirmary charges are not adjusted upon the student’s withdrawal.

Contractual LimitationsIf Smith College’s performance of its educational ob-jectives, support services, or lodging and food services is hampered or restrained on account of strikes, fire, shipping delays, acts of God, prohibition or restraint of governmental authority, or other similar causes beyond Smith College’s control, Smith College shall not be li-able to anyone, except to the extent of allowing in such cases a pro-rata reduction in fees or charges already paid to Smith College.

Payment Plans and Loan OptionsSmith offers a variety of payment plan and loan op-tions to assist you in successfully planning for timely payment of your college bill. Smith’s payment plans allow you to distribute pay-ments over a specific period. • the Semester Plan • the TuitionPay Monthly Plan (administered by Sallie Mae) • Prepaid Stabilization Plan Smith also offers some parent loan options. Details on loan options and payment plans can be found in Financing Your Smith Education, which is available from the Office of Student Financial Services. This information is also available on the Web at www.smith.edu/finaid.

Financial AidWe welcome women from all economic backgrounds. No woman should hesitate to apply to Smith because of an inability to pay the entire cost of her education. We make every effort to fully meet the documented finan-cial need of all admitted undergraduates who have met the published admission and financial aid deadlines. Awards are offered to applicants on the basis of need, and calculated according to established college and

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Fees, Expenses and Financial Aid 37

federal policies. An award is usually a combination of a grant, a loan, and a campus job. Smith College is committed to a financial aid policy that guarantees to meet the full financial need, as calculated by the college, of all admitted students who meet published deadlines. The college does operate under a need-sensitive admission policy that typically affects less than 8 percent of our applicant pool. Each applicant for admission is evaluated on the basis of her academic and personal qualities. However, the college may choose to consider a student’s level of financial need when making the final admission decision. Appli-cants are advised to complete the financial aid process if they will need financial help to enroll at Smith. Entering first-year students who fail to apply for finan-cial aid before the admission decision is issued will be ineligible to receive college-funded assistance until they have completed 64 credits earned at Smith. Transfer students and Ada Comstock Scholars who do not apply for financial aid at the time of admission are eligible to apply after completing 32 credits earned at Smith. Note that institutional financial aid may not be available to students who do not meet the published deadlines. To enable the college to determine a student’s need, a family completes both the Free Application for Fed-eral Student Aid (FAFSA) and the College Scholarship Service PROFILE form, requesting that data be sent to Smith. Both forms may be completed on-line. The FAFSA can be accessed at www.fafsa.ed.gov (Smith Col-lege code is 002209) and the PROFILE can be accessed at www.collegeboard.com (Smith College code is 3762). We also require a signed copy of the family’s most recent federal tax returns, including all schedules and W-2’s. Once we receive the applicant’s completed FAFSA and PROFILE, we review each student’s file individually. We take into consideration the number of dependents, the number of family members in college, divorced parents and other special circ*mstances. We require signed copies of parents’ and students’ most recent federal income tax returns to verify all the finan-cial information before we credit awards to a student’s account. International students should complete the Smith College Financial Aid Application for Students Living Abroad, and an official government statement or income tax return will be required to verify income. The college makes the final decision on the level of need and awards. Financial aid decisions to entering students are announced simultaneously with admis-sion notifications. College policy limits the awards of Smith funds to the level of billed fees.

A student who is awarded aid at entrance will have it renewed each year she attends according to her need, as calculated by the college, if she is in good academic standing. She and her family apply for aid annually with Smith College forms, FAFSA and PROFILE forms, and tax returns. The amount of aid may vary from year to year depending on changes in college fees and in the family’s financial circ*mstances. The balance of loan and grant also changes, based on federal loan limits. Instructions for renewing aid are made available to all students in early December. Students are expected to complete their undergraduate studies in eight semes-ters, and grant aid is limited to that period, except for special programs. Ada Comstock Scholars receiving financial aid are required to make satisfactory progress toward the de-gree in order to continue receiving aid—that is, com-pletion of at least 75 percent of all credits attempted in any academic year. Students not meeting this criterion are put on financial aid probation and may become ineligible for aid if the probationary period exceeds one year. Unless the administrative board decides that miti-gating circ*mstances warrant an exception, no federal student aid may be made available to a student who is not making satisfactory progress toward the degree (see p. 51).

First-Year Applicants Any student who needs help in financing her education should apply for financial aid at the time she applies for admission. The financial aid application require-ments are sent to all applicants for admission. Students must not wait until they have been accepted for admis-sion to apply for aid. Each student’s file is carefully reviewed to determine eligibility for need-based aid. Since this is a detailed process, the college expects students to follow published application guidelines and to meet the appropriate application deadlines. Students and parents are encouraged to contact Student Finan-cial Services via email at [emailprotected] or by phone (413-585-2530) with questions. Detailed information on the application process and deadlines is available on our Web site at www.smith.edu/finaid. The consequences of not applying for aid prior to being accepted for admission include a 64-credit waiting period before becoming eligible to receive college grant aid. This means that only federal, state

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38 Fees, Expenses and Financial Aid

and private assistance would be available for the first two years of undergraduate enrollment at Smith. The college will consider exceptions to this policy only if you experience and can document an unexpected family emergency. Please note that this policy does not pertain to students who, at the time of admission to Smith, applied for but were not granted need-based financial aid. If an entering student applied for but did not qual-ify for need-based aid in her first year, that student may reapply for aid in subsequent years. This is particularly important for families that experience changes in fam-ily circ*mstances such as a sibling entering college, reductions in parent income or unanticipated medical expenses. Returning students who want to apply for federal aid only have a modified application process. If there are major changes to the financial resources of the family, Student Financial Services will consider a new request for aid or a review of a previous denial at any time. The college cannot assume responsibility for family unwillingness to contribute to college expenses. There are limited circ*mstances that qualify a student for consideration as an independent aid applicant. Women over the age of 24, orphans and wards of the court are always considered self-supporting for federal financial aid purposes.

Transfer Students Transfer students should follow the same application procedures detailed on their specific financial aid ap-plications. Transfer students who do not apply for aid at the time of admission cannot apply for college aid until they reach junior standing and complete at least 32 credits at Smith.

Ada Comstock ScholarsWomen of nontraditional college age can apply to the Ada Comstock Scholars Program. Applicants for aid should complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), a Smith Application for Financial Aid, and send us a signed copy of their most recent federal tax return, complete with all schedules and W-2’s. An Ada Comstock Scholar who does not apply for aid at the time of admission cannot apply for institu-tional grant aid until she has completed 32 credits at Smith, although she may qualify for federal and state grants and loans before she has completed 32 credits.

This policy does not apply to women who applied for, but were not granted, aid at the time of admission.

International Applicants and Non-U.S. CitizensSmith College awards need-based aid to non-U.S. citizens, both first-year and transfer applicants. There is a great deal of competition for these funds, and the level of support provided from the college range widely, depending on particular family circ*mstances. Aid is determined based on the information provided by the family on the Smith College Financial Aid Application for Non-U.S. Citizens, along with translated tax or income statements. The application deadline is the same as the appli-cation deadline for admission: February 1. A non-U.S. citizen (Canadian citizens excepted) eligible for aid is offered a grant award in the first year that will remain at the same level for her sophom*ore and junior years. In her senior year, any increase in tuition and fees that is not covered by the increased loan will be covered by an increase in the grant so that her family contribution will remain the same as it was in her junior year. (Loan and campus job amounts, which are part of the total aid package, may increase each year to partially offset increases in billed expens-es.) Cost increases not covered by aid increases are the responsibility of the student and her family. For application deadlines and details, please check www.smith.edu/finaid.

Non-U.S. Citizens Living in the U.S. If you are a non-U.S. citizen whose parents are earning income and paying taxes in the United States, you will need to complete a CSS PROFILE form as well as the Smith Financial Aid Application for Non-U.S. Citizens and provide a complete and signed U.S. federal income tax return.

U.S. Citizens Living Outside the U.S. Follow procedures for applicants residing in the United States. However, if your parents are living and earning income outside the United States and do not file U.S. tax returns, you should also fill out the Smith Finan-cial Aid Application for Non-U.S. Citizens so that we can consider the actual expenses incurred by your family. U.S. citizens and permanent residents must reapply for aid each year.

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Fees, Expenses and Financial Aid 39

Financial Aid AwardsSmith’s resources for financial aid include loans, cam-pus jobs and grants; a student’s financial aid package will include one or more of these. A loan and job, both considered self-help, are usually the first components of an aid package, with any remaining need being met with grant aid.

LoansMost students borrow through the Federal Direct Ford Loan Program. Some awards may also include a Smith College loan. Federal Perkins Loans are offered to students to the extent of available federal funding. Most parents are eligible to borrow under the Federal Par-ent Loan Program and/or may make use of one of the plans described in Financing Your Smith Education. Students who receive aid of any sort from federal funds are subject to the statutes governing such aid.

Campus JobsStudent Financial Services administers campus jobs. All students may apply, but priority is given to those students (about one-half of our student body) who received campus job offers as part of their aid packages. First-year students work an average of eight hours a week for 32 weeks, usually for Dining Services. Students in other classes hold regular jobs averaging ten hours a week for 32 weeks. These monies are paid directly to each student as she earns them. They are intended primarily to cover personal expenses, but some students use part of their earnings toward required fees. Short-term jobs are open to all students. Additionally, a term-time internship program is administered by the Career Development Office. The college participates in the federally funded College Work-Study Program, which funds a portion of the earnings of eligible students, some of them in nonprofit, community service posi-tions and in the America Reads tutorial program. No student, whether on federal work-study or not, is permitted more than the maximum 12-hours a week or one “full-time” position. First-year students work a maximum of nine hours per week. Students receiving a stipend for positions such as STRIDE, HCA, etc. are not eligible for a second job. This policy attempts to offer all students an equal opportunity to work.

GrantsGrants are funds given to students with no require-ment of repayment or work time in exchange. Most Smith College grants come from funds given for this

purpose by alumnae and friends of the college and by foundations and corporations. The federal and state governments also provide assistance through need-based grants such as the Federal Pell Grant and state scholarships. Smith receives an allocation each year for Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants and for state-funded Gilbert Grants for Massachusetts residents.

Outside AidIf you receive any assistance from an organization outside of the college, this aid must be taken into con-sideration in calculating your financial aid award. For this reason, you are required to report such aid. Most outside scholarships are given to recognize particular achievement on the part of the recipient. These awards are allowed to reduce the suggested loan, job or institutional family contribution. However, in no case will the family contribution be reduced below the federally calculated family contribution. When outside awards have replaced the suggested loan and job, and the family contribution has been reduced to the feder-ally calculated level, Smith grant aid will be reduced dollar for dollar. Educational benefits from state and federal agen-cies are treated in the same way that outside merit-based scholarships are. Non-merit awards include tuition subsidies based on parent employment. These awards are not based on merit and reduce Smith grant eligibility dollar for dollar. Student Financial Services must be notified of all outside awards. If you notify us by July 1, the aid will be reflected in your official award and on your first bill. If you notify us after September 1, the outside aid may be used to reduce the Smith grant dollar for dollar.

Music GrantsEach year the college awards grants equal to $200 per semester for the cost of lessons in practical music to students who have financial need and who are accepted by the Department of Music.

Ernst Wallfisch Scholarship in MusicA full-year music performance scholarship (vocal or instrumental), based on merit and commitment, may be granted by the Music Department to a Smith student (first-year, sophom*ore or junior) enrolled in a perfor-mance course at Smith College.

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40 Fees, Expenses and Financial Aid

Scholarships for Northampton and Hatfield Residents—The Trustee GrantAt the discretion of the trustees, partial tuition grants may be awarded to accepted applicants who have been residents of Northampton or Hatfield with their parents for at least five years directly preceding the date of their admission to college. Such grants are continued through the four college years if the student maintains diploma grade, conforms to the regulations of the col-lege, and continues to be a resident of Northampton or Hatfield. The Trustee Grant may only be used for study at the Northampton campus.

ROTCAir Force ROTC is available at most colleges and universities in western Massachusetts, including Smith College. Air Force ROTC offers two-, three- and four-year enlistment scholarships to qualified new and continuing college students. For more information, call (413) 545-2437, send e-mail to [emailprotected] or visit www.umass.edu/afrotc.

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Admission

From the college’s beginning, students at Smith have been challenged by rigorous academic standards and supported by rich resources and facilities to develop to their fullest potential and define their own terms

of success. Admitting students who will thrive in the Smith environment remains the goal of our admission efforts. We seek students who will be productive mem-bers of the Smith community, who will be challenged by all that is offered here, and who will challenge their faculty members and peers to sharpen their ideas and perspectives of the world. Each year we enroll a first-year class of approxi-mately 640 able, motivated, diverse students whose records show academic achievement, intellectual curiosity and potential for growth. Because our students come from every state and 60 countries, their edu-cational and personal experiences and opportunities vary tremendously. In selecting a class, the Board of Admission, which is made up of faculty members as well as members of the admission staff, considers each student in the light of the opportunities available to her. Included in the board’s review are her secondary school record, the recommendations from her school, her College Board SAT I scores, or ACT, and any other avail-able information. Of critical importance is the direct communication we have with each student through her essay. Smith College meets fully the documented finan-cial need, as calculated by the college, of all admitted students. Two-thirds of our students receive some form of financial assistance through grants, loans and/or campus jobs. Further information about financial planning for a Smith education and about financial aid is available in the section on Fees, Expenses and Financial Aid, pages 33–40.

Secondary School PreparationThere is no typical applicant to Smith and no typical academic program, but we strongly recommend that a student prepare for Smith by taking the strongest

courses offered by her high school. Specifically this should include the following, where possible:• four years of English • three years of a foreign language (or two years in

each of two languages)• three years of mathematics• three years of science• two years of history Beyond meeting the normal minimum require-ments, we expect each candidate to pursue in greater depth academic interests of special importance to her. Candidates who are interested in our engineering major should pursue coursework in calculus, biology, chemistry and physics. Smith College will accept college-level work completed prior to matriculation as a degree student, provided that the relevant courses were completed at an accredited college or university and were not applied to the requirements for high school graduation. We also give credit for excellent performance in Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate and equivalent foreign examinations. Please refer to the Academic Rules and Procedures section for further information regarding eligibility for and use of such credit.

Entrance TestsWe require each applicant to take the Scholastic As-sessment Test (SAT I) or the American College Test (ACT). SAT II: Subject Tests are recommended but not required. We recommend that a candidate take the examinations in her junior year to keep open the pos-sibility of Early Decision and to help her counselors advise her appropriately about college. All examina-tions taken through December of the senior year are acceptable. The results of examinations taken after December arrive too late for us to include them in the decision-making process. A candidate can apply to take the SAT I and SAT II tests by visiting the College Board Web site at www.collegeboard.com. It is the student’s responsibility, in consultation with her school, to decide which tests and test dates are appropriate in the light of her program. It is also her responsibility to ask the College Entrance

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42 Admission

Examination Board to send to Smith College the results of all tests taken or to confirm with her counselor or other school official that the test results are included with her high school transcript. The College Board code number for Smith College is 3762. Students applying to take the ACT should visit the American College Testing Program Web site, www.act.org. The ACT code for Smith College is 1894.

Applying for AdmissionA student interested in Smith has three options for ap-plying—Fall Early Decision, Winter Early Decision and Regular Decision. Visit www.smith.edu/admission for information about requirements and deadlines.

Early DecisionFall and Winter Early Decision Plans are designed for students with strong qualifications who have selected Smith as their first choice. The plans differ from each other only in application deadline, recognizing that students may decide on their college preference at different times. In making an application to her first-choice college, a candidate eliminates much of the anxiety, effort and cost of preparing several college applications. Candidates under this plan may initiate applications to other colleges, but may make an Early Decision application to one college only. It is important to note that if accepted under Early Decision, a candi-date must withdraw all other college applications and may not make any further applications. A student applying for Early Decision should take her SAT I and SAT II tests before her senior year. The ACT may be substituted for the SAT I. Supporting mate-rials must include mid-semester senior grades. Applicants deferred in either Early Decision plan will be reconsidered in the spring, together with ap-plicants in the Regular Decision Plan. Offers of admis-sion are made with the understanding that the high school record continues to be of high quality through the senior year. If they have applied for financial aid by the published deadlines, candidates will be notified of financial aid decisions at the same time as the admis-sion decision.

Regular DecisionThe Regular Decision Plan is designed for students who wish to keep open several college options during the application process. Candidates may submit applica-tions anytime before the January 15 deadline.

A student interested in Smith should complete the Common Application online at www.commonapp.org. Included with the application are all the forms she will need, and instructions for completing each part of the application. A Common Application Supplement is also required. We realize that applying to college involves a lot of time-consuming paperwork for the applicant. It is work that we review carefully and thoroughly, and we suggest that applicants do not leave it to the last moment.

Advanced PlacementSmith College participates in the Advanced Placement Program administered by the College Entrance Exami-nation Board. Please refer to the Academic Rules and Procedures section (p. 50) for information governing eligibility for and use of Advanced Placement credit.

International BaccalaureateThe amount of credit will be determined as soon as an official copy of results has been sent to the registrar’s office. Guidelines for use are comparable to those for Advanced Placement.

InterviewWe recommend an interview for all candidates. For those who live or attend school within 200 miles of the college an on-campus interview is encouraged. Oth-ers should visit our Web site to obtain the name of an alumna interviewer in their area. The interview allows each candidate to become better acquainted with Smith and to exchange information with a member of the staff of the Office of Admission or a trained alumna volunteer.

Deferred EntranceAn admitted first-year or transfer applicant who has ac-cepted Smith’s offer and paid the required deposit may defer her entrance for one year to work, travel or pursue a special interest if she makes this request in writing to the director of admission by June 1 who will review the request and notify the student within two weeks.

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Admission 43

Deferred Entrance for Medical ReasonsAn admitted first-year or transfer applicant who has accepted Smith’s offer and paid the required deposit may request to postpone her entrance due to medical reasons if she makes this request in writing, explaining the nature of the medical problem, to the director of admission by August 30. At that time, the college will outline expectations for progress over the course of the year. A Board of Admission subcommittee will meet the following March to review the student’s case. Readmis-sion is not guaranteed.

Transfer AdmissionA student may apply for transfer to Smith College in January or September after the completion of one or more semesters at another institution. For January entrance, she must submit her applica-tion and send all credentials by November 15. Decisions will be mailed by mid-December. The suggested filing date for September entrance is February 1, especially for students applying for financial aid. The application deadline is May 15. Candidates whose applications are complete by March 1 will receive admission decisions by the first week in April. Students whose applications are complete by May 15 will receive decisions by June 1. Letters from the financial aid office are mailed at the same time as admission letters. We expect a transfer student to have a strong aca-demic record and to be in good standing at the institu-tion she is attending. We look particularly for evidence of achievement in college, although we also consider her secondary school record. Her program should cor-relate with the general Smith College requirements given on pages 41–42 of this catalogue. We require a candidate for the degree of bachelor of arts to spend at least two years in residence at Smith College in Northampton, during which time she nor-mally completes 64 credits. A student may not transfer to the junior class and spend any part of the junior or senior year studying in off-campus programs.

International StudentsWe welcome applications from qualified international students and advise applicants to communicate with the Office of Admission at least one year in advance

of their proposed entrance. The initial e-mail or let-ter should include information about the student’s complete academic background. If financial aid is needed, this fact should be made clear in the initial correspondence.

Visiting Year ProgramsSmith College welcomes a number of guest students for a semester or a year of study. In the Visiting Student Program, students enrolled in accredited, four-year liberal arts colleges or universities in the United States may apply to spend all or part of their sophom*ore, junior or senior year at Smith. International students may apply to spend a year at Smith under the International Visiting Program. (Exceptions may be made if a student wishes to visit for only one semester.) Applicants must be in their final year of studies leading to university entrance in their own country or currently enrolled in a university pro-gram abroad. If accepted, candidates will be expected to present examination results—Baccalaureate, Abitur or GCSE, for example—before enrolling. Evidence of English fluency will be required of applicants whose first language is not English. Applicants to the visiting programs must furnish a transcript of their college work (or secondary school work, where applicable) to date, faculty recommenda-tion, an adviser’s or dean’s reference and a completed application. Applications must be completed by July 1 for September entrance and by December 15 for Janu-ary entrance. Financial aid is not available for these programs except the visiting program in mathematics. Information and application material may be ob-tained by visiting www.smith.edu/admission or sending e-mail to [emailprotected].

ReadmissionSee Withdrawal and Readmission, page 53.

Ada Comstock Scholars ProgramThe admission process for Ada Comstock Scholars is competitive. Particular emphasis is placed on aca-demic achievement, an autobiographical essay and an exchange of information in the interview. A candidate

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44 Admission

should schedule her interview appointment before submitting her application prior to the deadline, Febru-ary 1. It is recommended that an applicant bring copies of her college transcripts to her interview appointment. Ada Comstock Scholars are expected to have com-pleted a minimum of 32 transferable liberal arts credits before matriculation at Smith. The average number of transfer credits for an admitted student is 50. Those students who offer little or no college-level work are advised to enroll elsewhere to fulfill this requirement before initiating the application process. A candidate’s status as an Ada Comstock Scholar must be designated at the time of application. Normal-ly, an applicant admitted as a student of traditional age will not be permitted to change her class status to Ada Comstock Scholar until five years after she withdraws as a student of traditional age. A woman who meets the transfer credit guideline must apply as an Ada Com-stock Scholar if she also meets the federal government’s guidelines defining independent students:• at least 24 years old• a veteran• responsible for dependent(s) other than a spouse A brief description of the program can be found on page 11. Information about expenses and procedures for applying for financial aid can be found in the sec-tion entitled Fees, Expenses and Financial Aid. Inqui-ries in writing, by phone or by e-mail may be addressed to the Office of Admission.

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Requirements for the DegreeThe requirements for the degree from Smith College are completion of 128 credits of academic work and satisfactory completion of a major. For graduation the minimum standard of performance is a cumulative average of 2.0 in all academic work and a minimum average of 2.0 in the senior year. For those entering as first-year students, satisfactory completion of a writing intensive course in the first year is required. Students earning a bachelor of arts degree must complete at least 64 credits outside the department or program of the major (56 credits for majors requiring the study of two foreign languages taught within a single department or program). The requirements for the bachelor of science degree in engineering are listed in the courses of study section under Engineering. Candidates for the degree must complete at least four semesters of academic work, a minimum of 64 credits, in academic residence at Smith College in Northampton; two of these semesters must be com-pleted during the junior or senior year. (For accelerated programs, see p. 11.) A student on a Smith Junior Year Abroad Program, the Jean Picker Semester-in-Washington Program or the Internship Program at the Smithsonian Institution is not in academic residence in Northampton. Each student is responsible for knowing all regula-tions governing the curriculum and course registration and is responsible for planning a course of study in ac-cordance with those regulations and the requirements for the degree. Normally, students may not change the designated number of credits for a variable credit spe-cial studies.

Course ProgramThe normal course program for traditional-aged undergraduates consists of 16 credits taken in each of eight semesters at Smith. Only with the approval of the administrative board may a student complete her de-gree requirements in fewer or more than eight semes-ters. The minimum course program for a traditional-aged undergraduate in any semester is 12 credits. A

traditional-aged student who is enrolled in fewer than 12 credits in any semester is required to withdraw at the end of that semester. The student must remain away from the college for at least one semester and then may apply for readmission for the following semester. Approved summer-school or interterm credit may be used to supplement a minimum 12-credit program or to make up a shortage of credits. Smith students may accrue a maximum of 12 summer-school credits and 12 interterm credits at Smith or elsewhere toward their Smith degree. An overall maximum of 32 credits of combined summer, interterm, AP and pre-matricu-lation credits may be applied toward the degree. See Academic Credit, pages 48–50. A student enters her senior year after completing a maximum of six semesters and attaining at least 96 Smith College or approved transfer credits. A student may not enter the senior year with a shortage of credits: exceptions require a petition to the Administrative Board prior to the student’s return to campus for her final two semesters. A student in residence may carry no more than 24 credits per semester unless approved by the Administrative Board.

Admission to CoursesInstructors are not required to hold spaces for students who do not attend the first class meeting and may re-fuse admittance to students seeking to add courses who have not attended the first class meetings.

PermissionsSome courses require written permission of the instruc-tor and/or chair of the department concerned before the course is elected. A student who does not have the prerequisites for a course may elect it only with the permission of the instructor and the chair of the department in which the course is offered. A student must petition the administrative board for permission to enter or drop a yearlong course with credit at midyear. The petition must be signed by the instructor of the course, the student’s adviser and the chair of the department concerned before it is submit-ted to the class dean.

Academic Rules and Procedures

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SeminarsSeminars are limited to 12 students and are open, by permission of the instructor, to juniors, seniors and graduate students only. At the discretion of the instruc-tor and with the approval of the department chair or the program director, 15 students may enroll. If enroll-ment exceeds this number, the instructor will select the best-qualified candidates.

Special StudiesPermission of the instructor, the department chair and in some cases the department is required for the elec-tion of Special Studies. Special Studies are open only to qualified juniors and seniors. A maximum of 16 credits of special studies may be counted toward the degree. Normally students may not change the designated number of credits for a variable credit special studies.

Independent StudyIndependent study for credit may be proposed by qualified juniors and seniors. Approval of the appropri-ate department(s) and the Committee on Academic Priorities is required. Time spent on independent study off campus cannot be used to fulfill the residence re-quirement. The deadline for submission of proposals is November 30 for a second-semester program and April 30 for a first-semester program.

InternshipsAn internship for credit, supervised by a Smith faculty member, may be proposed by qualified sophom*ores, juniors and seniors. Approval of the appropriate department(s) and the Committee on Academic Priori-ties is required. The deadline for submission of propos-als is November 30 for a second-semester program and April 30 for a first-semester program.

AuditingA degree student at Smith or at the Five Colleges may audit a course on a regular basis if space is available and the permission of the instructor is obtained. An audit is not recorded on the transcript.

Auditing by Nonmatriculated StudentsA nonmatriculated student who has earned a high school diploma and who wishes to audit a course may do so with the permission of the instructor and the reg-istrar. An auditor must submit a completed registration form to the registrar’s office by the end of the second week of classes. A fee will be charged and is determined

by the type of course. Studio classes may not be audited except by permission of the art faculty following a writ-ten request to the department. Records of audits are not maintained.

Changes in Course RegistrationAdding and Dropping CoursesDuring the first 10 class days, a student may enter or drop a course with the approval of the adviser and after consultation with the instructor. From the 11th through the 15th day of class, a student may enter a course with the permission of the instructor, the adviser and the class dean. After the 10th day of classes a student may drop a course up to the end of the fifth week of the semester:1. after discussion with the instructor;2. with the approval of the adviser and the class dean;

and3. if, after dropping the course, she is enrolled in at

least 12 credits for regular letter grades. (This provi-sion does not apply to Ada Comstock Scholars.)

After the end of the fifth week of the semester a student may not drop a course. However, on two and only two occasions during her years at the college—once dur-ing her first year; once during any subsequent year—a student may drop a course at any time up to the end of the ninth week of classes, for any reason, without penalty. The drop form requires the signatures of the instructor, adviser and class dean. A student who wishes to drop a seminar or course with limited enrollment should do so at the earliest possible time so that another student may take ad-vantage of the opening. Because the organization and operation of such courses are often critically dependent on the students enrolled, the instructor may refuse permission to drop the course after the first 10 class days. A student registers for an Interterm course in No-vember, with the approval of her adviser. In January, a student may drop or enter an Interterm course within the first three days with a class dean’s signature. Other-wise, the student who registers but does not attend will receive a “U” (unsatisfactory) for the course. Regulations governing changes in enrollment for courses in one of the other four colleges may be more restrictive than the above. Instructions and deadlines for registration in Five College courses are published online by the registrar’s office.

46 Academic Rules and Procedures

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Fine for Late RegistrationA student who has not registered for courses by the end of the first 10 days of classes will be fined $30, payable at the time of registration. In addition, a fine of $30 will be assessed for each approved petition to add or drop a course after the deadline. If a student has not completed registration by the end of the first four weeks of the semester, she will be administratively withdrawn.

Class Attendance and Assignments Students are expected to attend all their scheduled classes. Any student who is unable, because of her religious beliefs, to attend classes or to participate in any examination, study or work requirement on a particular day shall be excused from such activities without prejudice and shall be given an opportunity to make them up. Students are expected to spend at least two hours per week in preparation for every class hour. Students are asked to introduce guests to the in-structor of a class before the beginning of the class if there is an opportunity and at the end if there is not. Absence does not relieve the student from respon-sibility for work required while she was absent. The instructor may require her to give evidence that she has done the work assigned. In courses in which the writ-ten examinations can test only a part of the work, the instructor may rule that a student who does not attend class with reasonable regularity has not presented evi-dence that she has done the work. The due date for final papers in each semester can be no later than the end of the examination period. Instructors must specify the acceptable format, exact deadline and place of delivery for final papers. If a paper or other course work is mailed to an instructor, it must be sent by certified mail, return receipt requested, and the student must keep a paper copy. It is the student’s responsibility to check that work submitted by e-mail or fax has been received by the professor.

Deadlines and ExtensionsOnly the class dean may authorize an extension for any reason beyond the end of the final examination period. Such extensions, granted for reasons of illness, emergency or extenuating personal circ*mstances, will always be confirmed in writing with the faculty mem-ber, the registrar and the student. An individual faculty

member, without authorization by the class dean, may grant extensions on work due during the semester through the last day of final exams.

Pre-examination PeriodThe pre-examination study period, between the end of classes and the beginning of final examinations, is set aside for students to prepare for examinations. There-fore, the college does not schedule social, academic or cultural activities during this time. Deadlines for papers, take-home exams or other course work cannot be during the pre-examination study period.

Final ExaminationsMost final exams at Smith are self-scheduled and administered by the registrar during predetermined periods. A student may elect in which period she wants to take each exam. Exams are picked up at distribution centers after showing a picture ID and must be re-turned to the same center no more than two hours and 20 minutes from the time they are received by the stu-dent. Extra time taken to write an exam is considered a violation of the Academic Honor Code and will be reported to the Academic Honor Board. A student who is late for an exam may write for the remaining time in the examination period but may not have additional time. Exams which involve slides, dictation or listening comprehension are scheduled by the registrar. Such examinations may be taken only at the scheduled time. For information regarding illness during the examination period, call Health Services at extension 2800 for instructions. Students who become ill during an examination must report directly to Health Services. Further details of the Academic Honor Code as they apply to examinations and class work are given in the Smith College Handbook (www.smith.edu/sao/hand-book). Regulations of the faculty and the registrar regarding final examination procedures are published online at the registrar's office Web site prior to the final examination period. No scheduled or self-scheduled examination may be taken outside the regular examination period without prior permission of the administrative board. Written requests must be made to the administrative board through the class dean (not to individual faculty members). Requests to take final examinations early will not be considered; therefore, travel plans must be made accordingly.

Academic Rules and Procedures 47

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Five College Course EnrollmentsStudents planning to enroll in a course at one of the other four institutions may submit their requests online through BannerWeb. Five College course requests should be submitted during the period for advising and election of courses for the coming semester. Course informa-tion is available online through the Five College online course guide or at the individual Web sites of the other four institutions. Free bus transportation to and from the institution is available for Five College students. Students in good standing are eligible to take a course at one of the other institutions: first-semester first-year students must obtain the permission of the class dean. A student must: a) enroll in a minimum of eight credits at Smith in any semester, or b) take no more than half of her course program off campus. A student must register for an approved course at one of the other four institutions by the end of the interchange deadline (the first two weeks of the semester). Students must adhere to the registration procedures and deadlines of their home institution. Five College courses are those taught by special Five College faculty appointees. These courses are listed on pages 388–396 in this catalogue. Cooperative courses are taught jointly by faculty members from several institutions and are usually approved and listed in the catalogues of the participating institutions. The same registration procedures and approvals apply to Five College courses and cooperative courses. A list of Five College courses approved for Smith College degree credit is available at the registrar’s office. Requests for approval of courses not on the list may be submitted to the registrar’s office for review; however, Smith Col-lege does not accept all Five College courses for credit toward the Smith degree. Courses offered through the UMass Continuing Education Department are not part of the Five College Interchange. Students may not receive transfer credit for Continuing Education courses completed while in residence at Smith College, but may receive credit for those offered during Interterm and summer. Students taking a course at one of the other in-stitutions are, in that course, subject to the academic regulations, including the calendar, deadlines and academic honor system, of the host institution. It is the responsibility of the student to be familiar with the pertinent regulations of the host institution, includ-ing those for attendance, academic honesty, grading options and deadlines for completing coursework and

taking examinations. Students follow the registration add/drop deadlines of their home institution. Regula-tions governing changes in enrollment in Five College courses are published online at the beginning of each semester at the registrar’s office Web site.

Academic CreditGrading SystemGrades are recorded by the registrar at the end of each semester. Grade reports are made available online through BannerWeb at that time. Grades at Smith indicate the following:

A (4.0) C– (1.7)A– (3.7) D+ (1.3)B+ (3.3) D (1.0)B (3.0) D– (0.7)B– (2.7) E (0.0)C+ (2.3) S: satisfactory (C– or better)C (2.0) U: unsatisfactory X: official extension authorized by the class dean M: unreported grade calculated as a failure

Grades earned in Five College courses are recorded as submitted by the host institution. A Five College incomplete grade is equivalent to a failing grade and is calculated as such until a final grade is submitted. An incomplete grade will be converted to a failing grade on the student’s official record if coursework is not completed by the end of the following semester.

Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory OptionCoursework in any one semester may be taken for a satisfactory (C– or better)/unsatisfactory grade, provid-ing that:1) the instructor approves the option;2) the student declares the grading option for Smith

courses by the end of the ninth week of classes. Students enrolled in Five College courses must de-clare the option at the host campus and follow the deadlines of that institution. The fall deadline also applies to yearlong courses designated by a “D” in the course number. In yearlong courses designated by a “Y” students may elect a separate grading option for each semester. Students electing the S/U

48 Academic Rules and Procedures

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option for both semesters of a yearlong course must do so each semester.

Within the 128 credits required for the degree, a maximum of 16 credits (Smith or other Five College) may be taken for the satisfactory/unsatisfactory grading option, regardless of how many graded credits students are enrolled in per semester. Some departments will not approve the satisfactory/unsatisfactory grading option for courses counting toward the major. Satisfactory/unsatisfactory grades do not count in the grade point average. An Ada Comstock Scholar or a transfer student may elect the satisfactory/unsatisfactory grading option for four credits out of every 32 that she takes at Smith Col-lege.

Repeating CoursesNormally, courses may not be repeated for credit. In a few courses, the content of which varies from year to year, exceptions to this rule may be made by the instructor and the chair of the department. A student who has failed a course may repeat it with the original grade remaining on the record. The second grade is also recorded. A student who wants to repeat a course she has not failed may do so for no credit. The second grade is recorded but does not count in the grade point average.

Performance CreditsStudents are allowed to count a limited number of performance credits toward the Smith degree. The maximum number allowed is indicated in the Courses of Study section under the appropriate departments. Excess performance credits are included on the tran-script but do not count toward the degree.

Shortage of CreditsA shortage of credits incurred by failing or dropping a course may be made up by an equivalent amount of work carried above the normal 16-credit program, or with approved summer-school or Interterm courses accepted for credit toward the Smith College degree. In the case of failure in a course or dropping a course for reasons of health, a shortage may be filled with a student’s available Advanced Placement or other pre-matriculation credits. Any student with more than a two-credit shortage may be required to complete the shortage before returning for classes in September.

A student may not enter her senior year with fewer than 96 credits of Smith College or approved transfer credit; exceptions require a petition to the Administra-tive Board prior to the student’s return to campus for her final two semesters. A student may not participate in a Smith-sponsored or affiliated Junior Year Abroad or exchange program with a shortage of credit.

Transfer CreditA student who attends another accredited college or university and requests credit toward a Smith College degree for the work done there:a) should make her plans in accordance with the

regulations concerning off-campus study and, in the case of seniors, in accordance with the regula-tions concerning academic residence;

b) should obtain, from the class dean’s office, the guidelines for transferring credit. Official tran-scripts should be sent directly to the registrar from the other institution;

c) must, if approved to study abroad, have her pro-gram approved in advance by the Committee on Study Abroad.

Final evaluation of credit is made after receipt of the official transcript showing satisfactory completion of the program. A student may not receive credit for work completed at another institution while in residence at Smith Col-lege, except for Interterm courses and courses taken on the Five College interchange. Credit is not granted for online courses. Transfer credit policies and guidelines are pub-lished online at the registrar’s office Web site and are available at the class deans’ office.

Summer-School CreditStudents may accrue a maximum of 12 approved sum-mer-school credits toward their Smith degree with an overall maximum of 32 credits of combined summer, interterm, AP and pre-matriculation credits. With the prior approval of the class dean, summer credit may be used to allow students to make up a shortage of credits or to undertake an accelerated course program. For transfer students and Ada Comstock Scholars, summer school credits completed prior to enrollment at Smith College are included in the 12-credit maximum.

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Interterm CreditThe college may offer courses for credit during the interterm period. Such courses will carry one to four credits and will count toward the degree. The college will consider for-credit academic interterm courses taken at other institutions. The number of credits ac-cepted for each interterm course (normally up to 3) will be determined by the registrar upon review of the credits assigned by the host institution. Any interterm course designated as 4 credits by a host institution must be reviewed by the class deans and the registrar to determine whether it merits an exception to the 3-credit limit. Students may accrue a maximum of 12 approved interterm credits at Smith or elsewhere toward their Smith degree with an overall maximum of 32 credits of combined summer, interterm, AP and pre-matricula-tion credits. Students may not take more than 4 credits during any one interterm at Smith or elsewhere. For transfer students, interterm credits completed prior to enrollment at Smith College are included in the 12-credit maximum. The interterm may also be a period of reading, research or concentrated study for both students and faculty. Faculty, students or staff may offer noncredit instruction or experimental projects in this period. Special conferences may be scheduled and field trips may be arranged at the discretion of individual mem-bers of the faculty. Libraries, the Center for Foreign Languages and Cultures, practice rooms and physical education facilities will remain open at the discretion of the departments concerned. This period also provides time for work in libraries, museums and laboratories at locations other than Smith College.

College Credit Earned Before MatriculationSmith College will accept college credit with a grade of B– or better earned at an accredited college or university before matriculation as a first-year student. Such credit must be approved according to Smith Col-lege guidelines for transfer credit and submitted on an official college or university transcript. Such credits must be taken on the college or university campus with matriculated degree students and must be taught by a college or university professor. The course may not be listed on the high school transcript as counting toward high school graduation. Note that the restriction of 32 credits holds for any combination of AP and/or col-

lege credit earned before matriculation. Credits earned before matriculation may be used in the same manner as AP credits toward the Smith degree and may not be used to fulfill the distribution requirements for Latin Honors. Summer credits earned before matriculation will be counted in the 12-credit limit of summer credit applicable to the Smith degree.

Advanced PlacementSmith College participates in the Advanced Placement Program administered by the College Entrance Ex-amination Board. Advanced Placement credit may be used with the approval of the Administrative Board only (1) to make up a shortage of credits incurred through failure; (2) to make up a shortage of credit incurred as a result of dropping a course for reasons of health; or (3) to undertake an accelerated course program. Credits are recorded for scores of 4 or 5 on most Advanced Placement examinations. The credits to be recorded for each examination are determined by the individual department. A maximum of one year (32 credits) of Advanced Placement credit may be counted toward the degree. Students entering with 24 or more Advanced Placement credits may apply for advanced standing after completion of the first semester’s work. Students who complete courses that cover substan-tially the same material as those for which Advanced Placement credit is recorded may not then apply that Advanced Placement credit toward the degree require-ments. The individual departments will determine what courses cover the same material. The individual departments will determine place-ment in or exemption from Smith courses and the use of Advanced Placement credit to fulfill major require-ments. No more than eight credits will be granted toward the major in any one department. Advanced Placement credit may be used to count toward the 64 credits outside the major department or program but may not be used to fulfill the distribution requirements for Latin Honors.

International Baccalaureate and Other Diploma ProgramsCredit may be awarded for the International Baccalau-reate and 13th year programs outside the United States. The amount of credit is determined by the registrar upon review of the final results. Such credits may be used toward the Smith degree in the same manner as

50 Academic Rules and Procedures

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AP credits and may not be used to fulfill the distribu-tion requirements for Latin Honors.

Academic StandingA student is in good academic standing as long as she is matriculated at Smith and is considered by the administrative board to be making satisfactory progress toward the degree. The academic standing of all stu-dents is reviewed at the end of each semester.

Academic ProbationA student whose academic record is below 2.0, either cumulatively or in a given semester, will be placed on academic probation for the subsequent semester. Probationary status is a warning. Notification of probationary status is made in writing to the student, her family and her academic adviser. Instructors of a student on probation may be asked to make academic reports to the class deans’ offices during the period of probation. The administrative board will review a student’s record at the end of the following semester to determine what action is appropriate. The administra-tive board may require such a student to change her course program, to complete summer study or to with-draw from the college. In general, a student on probation is advised to take no more than 16 credits. She may not enroll in courses through the Five College interchange, and may not run for or hold elected or selected office, either campuswide or within her house. Students whose grade point average is below 2.0 may not compete in intercollegiate athletics or club sports.

Standards for Satisfactory ProgressA student is not making satisfactory progress toward the degree if she remains on academic probation for more than two consecutive semesters. In addition: (1) For students of traditional age, the record cannot have more than an eight-credit shortage for more than two consecutive semesters. (2) For Ada Comstock Scholars, at least 75 percent of all credits attempted in any aca-demic year must be completed satisfactorily. Students not meeting this criterion may be placed on academic probation or required to withdraw; if students are re-ceiving financial aid, they will be placed on financial aid probation and may become ineligible for financial aid if the probationary period exceeds one year. Fur-

ther information is available from the Dean of Ada Comstock Scholars and the Office of Student Financial Services.

Absence from ClassesA student who is absent from classes for more than four weeks in any semester will not receive credit for the work of that semester and will be administratively withdrawn from the college.

Separation from the CollegeA student whose college work or conduct is deemed unsatisfactory is subject to separation from the college by action of the administrative board, the honor board, the college judicial board or the dean of the college. There will be no refund for tuition or room fees.

Administrative BoardThe administrative board administers the academic requirements defined by faculty legislation. In general, academic matters affecting students are referred to this board for action or recommendation. The board con-sists of the dean of the college (chair), the class deans, the dean of the Ada Comstock Scholars, the registrar and three faculty members appointed by the president. Petitions for exceptions to academic regulations are submitted in writing to the administrative board through the class dean, with appropriate faculty ap-provals. The administrative board will reconsider a decision only if new information is presented. The board has the authority to take action with respect to the academic performance of individual students, including the requirement that a student must leave the college.

Student Academic GrievancesThe Smith College community has always been dedi-cated to the advancement of learning and the pursuit of truth under conditions of freedom, trust, mutual respect and individual integrity. The learning experi-ence at Smith is rooted in the free exchange of ideas and concerns between faculty members and students. Students have the right to expect fair treatment and to be protected against any inappropriate exercise of faculty authority. Similarly, instructors have the right to expect that their rights and judgments will be respected by students and other faculty members.

Academic Rules and Procedures 51

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When differences of opinion or misunderstand-ing about what constitutes fairness in requirements or procedures leads to conflict, it is hoped that these differences will be resolved directly by the individuals involved. When disputes cannot be resolved informally by the parties involved, procedures have been estab-lished to achieve formal resolution. These procedures are explained in detail in the Smith College Handbook (www.smith.edu/sao/handbook).

The Age of MajorityUnder Massachusetts law, the age of majority is 18 and carries full adult rights and responsibilities. The college normally communicates directly with students in mat-ters concerning grades, academic credit and standing. However, the regulations of the federal Family Edu-cational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 make clear that information from the educational records of students who are dependents of their parents for Internal Rev-enue Service purposes, may be disclosed to the parents without the student’s prior consent. It is the policy of the college to notify both the student and her parents in writing of probationary status, dismissal and certain academic warnings. Any student who is not a depen-dent of her parents, as defined by the Internal Revenue Code, must notify the registrar of the college in writing, with supporting evidence satisfactory to the college, by October 1 of each academic year. In communications with parents concerning other matters, it is normally college policy to respect the privacy of the student and not to disclose information from student educational records without the prior consent of the student. At the request of the student, such information will be provided to parents and guardians. Students may authorize the release of in-formation from their education records to their parents by completing the appropriate form at the registrar’s office.

Leaves, Withdrawal and ReadmissionOff-Campus Study or Personal LeavesA student who wishes to be away from the college for a semester or academic year must submit a request

for approved off-campus study or personal leave. The request must be filed with the student’s class dean by May 1 for a fall semester or academic year absence; by December 1 for a second semester absence. Students in good academic standing who miss these deadlines and need to be away from campus for a semester or year may request a late leave through their class dean. A student who wants to be away from the college for more than one year must withdraw. A student going on a Smith College Junior Year Abroad program or other approved study abroad pro-gram must file a request for approved off-campus study by the appropriate deadline. A student who wishes to complete part or all of her senior year away from campus on a Smith or non-Smith program or at another undergraduate institution must petition the administrative board. The petition must include a plan for the satisfactory completion of the major and degree requirements, and must have the approval of the department of the major. The petition must be filed in the Office of the Class Deans by the deadline to request approval of off-campus study. A student who expects to attend another college and request transfer credit on her return must abide by published guidelines (available in the class dean’s office) for transferring credit. A student may request provisional approval of transfer credit through the class deans’ office. For final evaluation of credit, an official transcript must be sent directly from the other institu-tion to the registrar at Smith College. A student on approved off-campus study or personal leave is expected to adhere to the policies regarding such absences (available in the class dean’s office). A student’s account must be in good standing or the request will not be approved.

Medical LeaveIf a student leaves the college on the advice of the health services, confirmation will be sent to her and her family by the registrar. A student is considered withdrawn and must apply for readmission through the registrar. A full report from her health care provider must be sent to the director of health services (or the associate director when specified). The student’s health will be evaluated and a personal interview and docu-mentation of improved functioning may be required before an application for readmission is considered by the administrative board. Clearance by the health services does not automatically guarantee readmission.

52 Academic Rules and Procedures

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The administrative board, which makes the final deci-sion on readmission, will also take into consideration the student’s college record.

Short-Term Medical LeaveA student who is away from campus for an extended pe-riod of time (i.e., a week or more) for medical reasons may be placed on a short-term medical leave by Health Services. Instructors will be notified of the student’s status by the class deans’ office. Any student who is placed on short-term medical leave, whether by Health Services or through her class dean, must receive clearance from Health Services be-fore returning to campus. Health Services may require documentation from her health care provider before the student can return. The student must notify her class dean of her intention to return to classes.

Mandatory Medical LeaveThe college physician or the director of the counseling service may require the withdrawal of a student who has any illness or condition that might endanger or be damaging to the health or welfare of herself or any member of the college community, or whose illness or condition is such that it cannot be effectively treated or managed while the student is a member of the college community.

Withdrawal and ReadmissionA student who plans to withdraw from the college should notify her class dean. When notice of with-drawal for the coming semester is given before June 30 or December 1, the student’s general deposit ($100) is refunded. Official confirmation of the withdrawal will be sent to the student by the registrar. A withdrawn student must apply to the registrar for readmission. Application for readmission in September must be sent to the registrar before March 1; for read-mission in January, before November 1. The admin-istrative board acts upon all requests for readmission and may require that applicants meet with the class dean or director of Health Services before considering the request. Normally, students who have withdrawn from the college must be withdrawn for at least one full semester.

Academic Rules and Procedures 53

A student who was formerly enrolled as a tradition-al student may not return as an Ada Comstock Scholar unless she has been away from the college for at least five years. Any student who has been away from Smith College for five or more years should make an appoint-ment to speak with the dean of Ada Comstock Scholars before applying for readmission.

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54

Graduate and Special Programs

Smith College offers men and women gradu-ate work leading to the degrees of master of arts in teaching, master of fine arts, master of education, master of education of the deaf and master of science. In addition,

master of arts and doctoral programs are offered in the School for Social Work. In special one-year programs, international students may qualify for a certificate of graduate studies or a diploma in American studies. Each year more than 100 men and women pursue such advanced work. Smith College is noted for its su-perb facilities, bucolic setting and distinguished faculty who are recognized for their scholarship and interest in teaching. Moreover, graduate students can expect to participate in small classes and receive personalized attention from instructors. Most graduate courses, which are designated as 500-level courses in the course listings, are planned for graduate students who are degree candidates. The de-partments offering this work present a limited number of graduate seminars, advanced experimental work or special studies designed for graduate students. Gradu-ate students may take advanced undergraduate courses, subject to the availability and according to the provi-sions stated in the paragraphs describing the require-ments for the graduate degrees. Departmental graduate advisers help graduate students individually to devise appropriate programs of study.

AdmissionTo enter a graduate degree program, a student must have a bachelor’s degree or its equivalent, an under-graduate record of high caliber and acceptance by the department concerned. All domestic applicants who wish to be considered for financial aid must submit all required application materials before January 15 of the proposed year of entry into the program, and all financial aid forms before February 15 (refer to Finan-cial Aid, page 58). The deadline for admission without financial aid to most graduate programs is April 1 of

Graduate and Special Programs, College Hall 307, Smith College, Northampton, MA 01063Telephone: (413) 585-3050 E-mail: [emailprotected]

the proposed year of entry for the first semester, and November 1 for the second semester. (For the master of fine arts in dance, the only deadline is January 15.) All international applications for a master’s degree or for the Diploma in American Studies Program must be received on or before January 15 of the proposed year of entry into the program. Applicants must submit the following: the formal application, the application fee ($60), an official transcript of the undergraduate record, letters of recom-mendation from instructors at the undergraduate insti-tution and scores from the Graduate Record Examina-tion (GRE). For the master of education (Ed.M.) and the master of education of the deaf (M.E.D.) only, the Miller Analogies Test is an acceptable alternative to the GRE. Applicants from non-English-speaking countries must submit official results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Applicants from English-speaking countries must submit the Graduate Record Examination. Candidates must also submit a paper written in an advanced undergraduate course, except for MFA playwriting candidates, who must also submit one or more full-length scripts or their equivalent. Address correspondence and questions to the address below. Smith College is committed to maintaining a di-verse community in an atmosphere of mutual respect and appreciation of differences.

Residence RequirementsStudents who are registered for a graduate degree program at Smith College are considered to be in resi-dence. A full-time graduate student takes a minimum course program of 12 credits per semester. A half-time student takes a minimum course program of eight credits per semester. With the approval of his or her ac-ademic adviser and the director of graduate programs, a student may take a maximum of 12 credits for degree credit at Amherst, Hampshire or Mount Holyoke col-leges or the University of Massachusetts. No more than

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two courses (eight credits) will be accepted in transfer from outside of the Five Colleges. We strongly recom-mend that work for advanced degrees be continuous; if it is interrupted or undertaken on a part-time basis, an extended period is permitted, but all work for a master’s degree normally must be completed within a period of four years. Exceptions to this policy will be considered by petition to the Administrative Board. During this period a continuation fee of $55 will be charged for each semester during which a student is not enrolled at Smith College in course work toward the degree.

Leaves of AbsenceA student who wishes to be away from the college for a semester or academic year for personal reasons may request a leave of absence. The request must be filed with the director of graduate programs by May 1 for a fall semester or academic-year leave; by December 1 for a second-semester leave. No leaves of absence will be approved after May 1 for the following fall semester or academic year and December 1 for the spring semester, and the student must withdraw from the college. A leave of absence may not be extended beyond one full academic year, and a student who wants to be away from the college for more than one year must withdraw. A student on a leave of absence is expected to ad-here to the policies regarding such leaves. A student’s tuition account must be in good standing or the leave of absence will be canceled.

Degree ProgramsFor all degree programs, all work to be counted toward the degree (including the thesis), must receive a grade of at least B–, but the degree will not be awarded to a student who has no grade above this minimum. Cours-es for graduate credit may not be taken on a satisfac-tory/unsatisfactory basis. The requirements described below are minimal. Any department may set additional or special requirements and thereby increase the total number of courses involved.

Master of Science in Biological SciencesThe Department of Biological Sciences maintains an active graduate program leading to the master of sci-ence in biological sciences. The program of study em-

phasizes independent research supported by advanced course work. Candidates are expected to demonstrate a strong background in the life sciences and a clear com-mitment to independent laboratory, field and/or theo-retical research. The department offers opportunities for original work in a wide variety of fields, including animal behavior, biochemistry, cell and developmental biology, ecology, environmental science, evolutionary biology, genetics, marine biology, microbiology, mo-lecular biology, neurobiology, plant sciences and physi-ology. Students pursuing the M.S. degree are required to participate in the Graduate Seminar (BIO 507) and are expected to undertake a course of study, designed in conjunction with their adviser, that will include appro-priate courses both within and outside the department A thesis is also required of each candidate for this degree. It may be limited in scope but must dem-onstrate scholarly competence; it is equivalent to a two-semester, eight-credit course. Two copies must be presented to the committee for deposit in the library. The thesis may be completed in absentia only by spe-cial permission of the department and of the director of graduate programs.

Master of Science in Exercise and Sport StudiesThe graduate program in exercise and sport studies focuses on preparing coaches for women’s intercol-legiate teams. The curriculum blends theory courses in exercise and sport studies with hands-on coaching experience at the college level. By design, the pro-gram is a small one, with only 12 to 16 candidates in residence. This makes it possible for students to work independently with faculty and coaches. Smith has a history of excellence in academics and a wide-ranging intercollegiate program composed of 14 varsity sports. Entrance into the two-year program requires a strong undergraduate record and playing and/or coaching experience in the sport in which a student will be coaching. Individuals who do not have undergraduate courses in exercise physiology and kinesiology should anticipate work beyond the normal 48 credits. For more information, contact Michelle Finley, Department of Exercise and Sport Studies, Smith College, Northamp-ton, MA 01063, (413) 585-3971; e-mail: [emailprotected]; www.smith.edu/ess.

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Master of Arts in TeachingThe departments of biological sciences, chemistry, English, French, geology, government, history, mathe-matics, physics and Spanish actively cooperate with the education and child study department in administering the M.A.T. program. The degree of master of arts in teaching is designed for prospective teachers in secondary schools. The M.A.T. program combines study in the field of the student’s academic interest (the teaching field) with experience in teaching and the study of American edu-cation. Prospective candidates should have a superior undergraduate record, including an appropriate con-centration—normally, a major—in the subject of the teaching field, and should present evidence of personal qualifications for effective teaching. Applicants are asked to submit scores for the Graduate Record Exami-nation. Candidates earn the degree in one academic year and one six-week summer session. Admission prerequi-sites and course requirements vary among cooperating departments. To qualify for a degree, the candidate must obtain a grade of B– or better in all courses or seminars, although a grade of C in one four-credit course may be permitted on departmental recommen-dation. Courses for graduate credit may not be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

Master of EducationThe program leading to the degree of master of educa-tion is designed for students who are planning to teach in elementary or middle schools and those wishing to do advanced study in the field of elementary education. The Department of Education and Child Study uses the facilities of a laboratory school operated by the college. The public schools of Northampton and vicinity, as well as several private schools, also cooperate in offering opportunities for observation and practice teaching. Students who follow the master of education program will, in the course of a six-week summer session and a full-time academic year, ordinarily complete the state-approved program in teacher education enabling them to meet requirements for licensure in various states. Candidates for the degree of master of education are selected on the basis of academic aptitude and gen-eral fitness for teaching. They should supply scores for either the Graduate Record Examination or the Miller Analogies Test. All applicants should submit a paper or

other piece of work that is illustrative of their writing. Applicants with teaching experience should submit a recommendation concerning their teaching.

Master of Education of the DeafThe Clarke School for the Deaf, in Northampton, and Smith College offer a cooperative program of study (one academic year and one summer) leading to the degree of Master of Education of the Deaf. Rolling admissions for this program for entry in summer 2008 will begin after December 1, although applications will be accepted as late as April 1 of that year. Further information can be found at www.clarkeschool.org/graduate.html.

Master of Fine Arts in DanceThe Department of Dance offers a two-year program of specialized training for candidates who demonstrate interest and unusual ability in dance. Choreography, performance, production, and history and literature of dance are stressed. To count toward the degree, all work must earn a grade of at least B–, but the degree will not be awarded to a student who has no grade above this minimum. Courses for graduate credit may not be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. The thesis requires a presentation of original choreography with production designs and written supportive materials. Interested students may consult the Department of Dance, Berenson Studio, Smith College, Northampton, Massachusetts 01063; phone (413) 585-3232.

Master of Fine Arts in PlaywritingThis program, offered by the Department of Theatre, provides specialized training to candidates who have given evidence of professional promise in playwriting. The Department of Theatre places great emphasis on collaborative work among designers, performers, direc-tors and writers, thus offering a unique opportunity for playwrights to have their work nurtured and supported by others who work with it at various levels. Sixty-four credit hours, including a thesis, and two years of residence are required. In a two-year sequence, a student would have eight required courses in direct-ing, advanced playwriting and dramatic literature and a total of eight electives at the 300 level or above, with the recommendation that half be in dramatic literature. Electives may be chosen from acting, direct-ing and design/tech courses and from courses outside

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the department and within the Five Colleges. To count toward the degree, all work must receive a grade of at least B–, but the degree will not be awarded to a stu-dent who has no grade above this minimum. Interested students may consult the graduate ad-viser, Leonard Berkman, Department of Theatre, Smith College, Northampton, MA 01063; (413) 585-3206; e-mail: [emailprotected].

Cooperative Ph.D. ProgramA cooperative doctoral program is offered by Amherst, Hampshire, Mount Holyoke and Smith colleges and the University of Massachusetts in the fields of astronomy, biological sciences, chemistry, geology, history and physics. The degree is awarded by the university in cooperation with the institution in which the student has done the research for the dissertation. Students in-terested in this program should write to the dean of the graduate school, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003, (413) 545-0721.

Master/Ph.D. of Social WorkThe School for Social Work offers a master of social work (M.S.W.) degree, which focuses on clinical social work and puts a heavy emphasis on direct field work practice. The program stresses the integration of clini-cal theory and practice with an understanding of the social contexts in which people live. It also emphasizes an understanding of the social policies and organiza-tional structure which influence our service delivery system. In addition, the school offers a Ph.D. program designed to prepare MSWs for leadership positions in clinical research education and practice. It also has ex-tensive postgraduate offerings through its Continuing Education Program. For more information on admis-sion or program detail, call the School for Social Work Office of Admission at (413) 585-7960 or e-mail at [emailprotected]. Information can also be found at the school’s Web site at www.smith.edu/ssw.

Nondegree StudiesCertificate of Graduate StudiesUnder special circ*mstances we may award the Certifi-cate of Graduate Studies to international students who have received undergraduate training in an institution of recognized standing and who have satisfactorily completed a year’s program of study under the direc-

tion of a committee on graduate study. This program must include at least 24 credits completed with a grade of B– or better. At least five of these courses should be above the intermediate level.

Diploma in American StudiesThis is a highly competitive one-year program open only to international students of advanced undergradu-ate or graduate standing. It is designed primarily, although not exclusively, for those who are teaching or who plan to teach some aspect of American culture and institutions. Candidates should have a bachelor’s degree or at least four years of university-level work or the equivalent in an approved foreign institution of higher learning, and must furnish satisfactory evidence of mastery of spoken and written English. The closing date for application is January 15. The program consists of a minimum of 24 credits: American Studies 555 and 556 (special seminars for diploma students only), 16 other credits in American studies or in one or more of the cooperating disciplines, including the required American Studies 570, the diplo-ma thesis. A cumulative grade average of B in course work must be maintained.

Post-Baccalaureate Program: The Center for Women in Mathematics at Smith College

Supported by NSF Grant 0611020 and Smith College

The Center for Women in Mathematics is a place for women to get intensive training in mathematics at the advanced undergraduate level. It is an opportunity to do math in a community that is fun, friendly and seri-ous about mathematics. The experience should also help build the skills and confidence needed to continue to graduate school in the mathematical sciences. The Post-Baccalaureate Program is for women with bachelor’s degrees who did not major in mathematics or whose mathematics major was light. This program is designed to improve students’ preparation and motivation to help them determine if they want to continue to graduate school in the math-ematical sciences. Students take three math courses each semester, including the Seminar in Advanced Mathematics. They have the opportunity to join a research team, working on a project with a Smith faculty member. There will be workshops on applying

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to graduate school and taking the GREs to supplement individual mentoring. The program is open to all women who have graduated from college with some course work in mathematics above the level of calculus and an interest in pursuing it further. Full tuition and a living stipend is available to U.S. citizens and perma-nent residents who are admitted to the program.

Applications & Contact InformationFor more information, or to request application materi-als, please contact Ruth Haas, Chair, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Smith College, Northamp-ton, MA 01063, telephone: 413-585-3872, e-mail: [emailprotected]

Financial AidPost-baccalaureate students (American Citizens or permanent residents) are eligible for a fellowship which includes full tuition and a stipend of $12,500 for the academic year.

To applyAll applicants should include letters of recommenda-tion from at least two mathematics professors, and a personal statement that describes how this program fits with the applicant’s background and goals. Applicants for the post-baccalaureate program should have taken at least one course beyond the level of calculus. Applications are reviewed on a rolling basis. The preferred deadline for January entrance is October 15, but applications are accepted through December 15. For September entrance, the preferred deadline is March 15, but applications are accepted through July 1. Students applying for financial aid are encouraged to apply by the preferred deadlines as funds are limited. Applications are processed through the office of Gradu-ate and Special Programs.

Nondegree StudentsWell-qualified students who wish to take courses are required to file a nondegree student application along with an official undergraduate transcript showing their degree and date awarded. Applications can be obtained from the Graduate and Special Programs office. The application deadline is August 1 for the fall semester and December 1 for the spring semester. Tuition must be paid in full before a nondegree student is allowed to register. The permission of each course instructor is necessary at the time of registration, during the first week of classes each semester. Nondegree students are

admitted and registered for only one semester and are not eligible for financial aid. Those wishing to take courses in subsequent semesters must reactivate their application each semester by the above deadlines. Students who later wish to change their status to that of a part-time or full-time student working for a degree must apply for admission as a degree candidate. Credit for Smith course work taken as a nondegree student may count toward the degree with the approval of the department concerned.

Housing and Health ServicesHousingA very limited amount of graduate student housing is available on campus. Smith offers a cooperative gradu-ate house with single bedrooms, large kitchen and no private bathrooms. Included is a room furnished with a bed, chest of drawers, mirror, desk and easy chair. Stu-dents provide their own board. For further details, send e-mail to [emailprotected]. For individuals wishing to check the local rental market, go to www.gazettenet.com/classifieds to find “Real Estate for Rent” and www.cshrc.org. It is advis-able to begin looking for housing as soon as you have decided to enroll.

Health ServicesGraduate students, both full-time and part-time, are eligible to use Smith’s health services and to participate in the Smith College health insurance program (see pp. 22 and 23 for complete information).

FinancesTuition and Other FeesApplication fee ........................................................... $60Full tuition, for the year ...................................... $33,940 16 credits or more per semesterPart-time tuition Fee per credit ................................................... $1,060Summer Intern Teaching Program tuition for degree candidates ............................................ $2,500Continuation fee, per semester ................................. $55Room only for the academic year ....................... $5,730

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Health insurance estimate (if coverage will begin August 15) ................. $2,150 (if coverage will begin June 15) ..................... $2,450

For additional information concerning fees for practical music and studio art see p. 35. Statements for semester fees are mailed in July and December from the Office of Student Financial Services. Payment of charges for the first semester is due in early August and for the second semester in early January.

DepositA general deposit of $100 is required from each student upon admittance. This is a one-time deposit that will be refunded in October, or approximately six months following the student’s last date of attendance, after deducting any unpaid charges or fees, provided that the graduate director has been notified in writing before July 1 that a student will withdraw for first semester or before December 1 for second semester. The deposit is not refunded if the student is separated from the college for work or conduct deemed unsatisfactory. It is not refunded for new students in the case of withdrawal before entrance.

RefundsPlease refer to page 36 for full information on refunds.

Financial AssistanceFinancial assistance for graduate students at Smith College consists of fellowships, tuition scholarships, and federal loans. Students interested in applying for any type of financial aid should read this section care-fully in its entirety; required materials and deadlines for application vary with the type of financial assistance requested. All applicants for financial assistance (fellow-ships, scholarships and/or loans) must 1) complete their application for admission by January 15 (new applicants), 2)complete an application for financial assistance by February 15, including all supplementary materials (required of both returning students and new applicants) indicating the types of financial assistance for which they will apply.

Fellowships Teaching Fellowships: Teaching fellowships are avail-able in the departments of biological sciences, educa-tion and child study, exercise and sport studies and dance. For the academic year 2007–08, the stipend for full teaching fellows is $11,440 for a first-year fellow and $11,960 for a second-year fellow. Teaching fellows also receive assistance to reduce or eliminate tuition expenses.

Research Fellowships: Research fellowships are granted for work in various science departments as funds become available; stipends vary in accordance with the nature and length of the appointment. During the academic year, the research fellow usually carries a half-time graduate program.

The teaching and research fellowships are of particular value to students who are interested in further study or research, since they combine fellowship aid with practical experience and an opportunity to gain com-petence in a special field of study. In accepting one of these appointments, the student agrees to remain for its duration. The number of fellowships is limited, and all ap-plicants are strongly urged also to apply for tuition scholarships and loans, as described below.

ScholarshipsThe college offers a number of tuition scholarships for graduate study. Amounts vary according to circum-stances and funds available. Applicants for scholarships must meet the January 15 deadline for submitting all materials for the admission application. In addition, the application for financial assistance, with all materi-als described on that form, is due by February 15 for both new applicants and returning students. LoansLoans are administered by the Student Financial Services. Federal William D. Ford Direct Loans may be included in aid offered to graduate students on admission. Applicants for loans must meet all federal guidelines and must agree to begin monthly payments on loans soon after completion of their work at Smith College.

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In an effort to encourage liberal arts graduates to enter the teaching professions, Smith College has instituted a forgivable loan program for M.A.T. candi-dates in the field of mathematics. Under this program, prospective students can apply for loans to meet tuition expenses not covered by scholarships. For each of the graduate’s first three years of teaching, the college will forgive a portion of that loan up to a total of 65 percent. Applications for loans received by February 15 will be given top priority. The processing of later applica-tions will be delayed.

Changes in Course RegistrationDuring the first 10 class days (September in the first semester and February in the second semester), a stu-dent may drop or enter a course with the approval of the adviser. From the 11th through the 15th day of class, a student may enter a course with the permission of the instructor, the adviser and the director of graduate programs. After the 10th day of classes, a student may drop a course up to the end of the fifth week of the semester (October in the first semester and February in the sec-ond semester): 1) after consultation with the instructor; and 2) with the approval of the adviser and the director of graduate programs. Instructions and deadlines for registration in Five College courses are distributed by the registrar's office.

Policy Regarding Completion of Required Course WorkA graduate student who is unable to complete required course work on time must submit to the director of graduate programs a written request for an extension before the end of the semester in which the grade is due. The request should include the reason the extension is needed and a specific date by which the student proposes to complete the work. The instructor of the course should also submit a statement in support of the extension. If the extension is granted, the work must be completed by the date agreed on by the director, instructor and student. No extensions may exceed one calendar year from the time of initial enrollment in the course. The initiative in arranging for the completion of course work rests with the student.

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Courses of Study, 2007-08 Academic Designation Division

Interdepartmental Minor in African Studies AFS I/IIMajor and Minor in the Department of Afro-American Studies AAS IInterdepartmental Major in American Studies AMS IIInterdepartmental Minor in Ancient Studies ANS I/IIMajors and Minor in Anthropology ANT IIInterdepartmental Minor in Archaeology ARC I/IIMajors and Minors in the Department of Art ART I Minors: Architecture and Urbanism ARU I Art History ARH I Graphic Art ARG I Studio Art ARS IMajor and Minor in the Five College Department of Astronomy AST IIIInterdepartmental Minor in Astrophysics APH IIIInterdepartmental Major in Biochemistry BCH IIIMajor and Minor in the Department of Biological Sciences BIO IIIMajor and Minor in the Department of Chemistry CHM IIIMajors and Minors in the Department of Classical Languages and Literatures CLS I Major: Classical Studies CST I Majors and Minors: Greek GRK I Latin LAT I Classics CLS IInterdepartmental Major in Comparative Literature CLT IMajor and Minors in the Department of Computer Science CSC III Minors: Digital Art CDA III Digital Music CDM III Systems Analysis CSA III Computer Science and Language CSL III Mathematical Foundations of Computer Science CSF IIIMajor and Minor in the Five College Dance Department DAN IMajor and Minor in the Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures* EAL I Major: East Asian Languages and Cultures EAC Minor: East Asian Languages and LiteraturesInterdepartmental Major and Minor in East Asian Studies EAS I/IIMajor and Minor in the Department of Economics ECO IIMajor and Minor in the Department of Education and Child Study EDC IIMajor and Minor in the Department of Engineering EGR III

Key: Division I The Humanities Division II The Social Sciences and History Division III The Natural Sciences*Currently includes Chinese (CHI), Japanese (JPN) and Korean (KOR)

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Major and Minor in the Department of English Language and Literature ENG I Interdepartmental Minor in Environmental Science and Policy EVS IIIInterdepartmental Minor in Ethics ETH I/II/IIIMinor in the Department of Exercise and Sport Studies ESS IIIInterdepartmental Minor in Film Studies FLS I/IIMajor in the Department of French Studies FRN IFirst-Year Seminars FYS I/II/IIIMajor and Minor in the Department of Geology GEO IIIMajor and Minor in the Department of German Studies GER IMajor and Minor in the Department of Government GOV IIMajor and Minor in the Department of History HST IIInterdepartmental Minor in History of Science and Technology HSC I/II/IIIInterdepartmental Minor in International Relations IRL IIMajor and Minor in the Department of Italian Language and Literature ITL I Major: Italian Studies ITS IInterdepartmental Major and Minor in Jewish Studies JUD I/IIMinor in Landscape Studies LSS IInterdepartmental Major and Minor in Latin American and Latino/a Studies LAS I/II Major: Latino/a Studies LATS I/IIInterdepartmental Minor in Linguistics LNG I/II/IIIInterdepartmental Minor in Logic LOG I/IIIInterdepartmental Minor in Marine Science and Policy MSC IIIMajor and Minor in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics MTH IIIInterdepartmental Major and Minor in Medieval Studies MED I/IIInterdepartmental Minor in Middle East Studies MESMajor and Minor in the Department of Music MUS IInterdepartmental Major and Minor in Neuroscience NSC IIIMajor and Minor in the Department of Philosophy PHI IMajor and Minor in the Department of Physics PHY IIIInterdepartmental Minor in Political Economy PEC IIMajor and Minor in the Department of Psychology PSY IIIInterdepartmental Minor in Public Policy PPL II/IIIMajor and Minor in the Department of Religion REL IMajors in the Department of Russian Language and Literature RUS I Majors: Russian Literature RUL I Russian Civilization RUC IMajor and Minor in the Department of Sociology SOC IIMajors and Minors in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese* SPP I Majors: Spanish SPN I Portuguese-Brazilian Studies SPB I Latin American Area Studies SLS Minors: Spanish SPN I Portuguese-Brazilian Studies SPB I Latin American Area Studies SLSInterdepartmental Minor in Statistics STS III

*Portuguese language courses are designated POR.

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Major and Minor in the Department of Theatre THE IInterdepartmental Minor in Third World Development Studies TWD I/IIInterdepartmental Minor in Urban Studies URS I/IIInterdepartmental Major and Minor in Study of Women and Gender SWG I/II/IIIExtradepartmental Course in Accounting ACC IIInterdepartmental Courses in Philosophy and Psychology PPY I/IIIOther Extradepartmental Courses EDPOther Interdepartmental Courses IDPFive College Course Offerings by Five College FacultyFive College Film Studies Major FLSFive College Certifi cate in African Studies AFCFive College Asian/Pacifi c/American Certifi cate Program APAFive College Certifi cate in Buddhist Studies BDHC Five College Certifi cate in Coastal and Marine Sciences MSCCFive College Certifi cate in Cognitive Neuroscience CNCFive College Certifi cate in Culture, Health and Science CHSFive College Certifi cate in International Relations IRCFive College Certifi cate in Latin American Studies LACFive College Certifi cate in Logic LOGC Five College Certifi cate in Middle East Studies MECFive College Certifi cate in Native American Indian Studies NAISFive College Certifi cate in Russian, East European and Eurasian StudiesFive College Self-Instructional Language Program SILForeign Language Literature Courses in TranslationInterterm Courses Offered for CreditScience Courses for Beginning StudentsAmerican Ethnicities CoursesQuantitative Courses for Beginning Students

Courses of Study 63

Deciphering Course ListingsCourse NumberingCourses are classified in six grades indicated bythe first digit of the course number. In some cases, sub-categories are indicated by the second and third digits.

100 level Introductory courses (open to all students)200 level Intermediate courses (may have prerequisites)300 level Advanced courses (have prerequisites)400 level Independent work—the last digit (with the exception of honors) represents the amount of credit assigned. Departments specify the number of credits customarily assigned for Special Studies.400 Special Studies (variable credit, as assigned)

408d (full year, eight credits)410 Internships (credits as assigned)420 Independent Study (credits as assigned)430d Honors Thesis (full year, eight credits)431 Honors Thesis (first semester only, eight credits)432d Honors Thesis (full year, 12 credits)500 level Graduate courses—for departments that offer graduate work, independent work is numbered as follows:580 Special Studies590 Thesis900 level Reserved for courses (e.g., music performance) that are identifiably distinct from the other offerings of a department.

A “j” after the course number indicates a course offered for credit during Interterm, and a “d” or “y” indicates a full-year course in which credit is granted after two consecutive semesters. In “d” courses, the final

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64 Courses of Study

grade assigned upon completion of the second semester is cumulative for the year. A course in which the spring semester is a continu-ation of the fall semester is given the next consecutive number and listed separately with the prerequisite indicated. Full-year courses are offered when it is not permis-sible for a student to receive credit for one semester only. Language courses are numbered to provide consis-tency among departments.

• The introductory elementary course in each lan-guage is numbered 100.

• The intensive course in each language is numbered 110 or 111 and normally is a full-year course.

• Intermediate language courses are numbered 120 for low intermediate and 220 for high intermediate.

Introductory science courses are numbered to pro-vide consistency among departments.

• The introductory courses that serve as the basis for the major are numbered 111 (and 112 if they con-tinue into a second semester). “Fast track” courses are numbered 115 (and 116 when appropriate).

• Courses at the introductory or intermediate level that do not count toward the major are numbered 100–109 and 200–209.

• Courses approved for listing in multiple depart-ments and programs are identified by the three-let-ter designation of the home department and are described fully in that department’s course listings.

Courses with Limited EnrollmentSeminars are limited to 12 students and are open only to juniors, seniors and graduate students, by permission of the instructor. At the discretion of the instructor and with the approval of the department chair or the program director, 15 students may enroll. The designation that a course is a seminar appears in the title unless all semi-nars appear as a separate and clearly designated group in the department’s course listing. The current topic, if applicable, immediately follows the title of the seminar. Colloquia, primarily reading and discussion courses with an enrollment limit of 20, are also clearly designated. Proseminars are directed courses of study con-ducted in the manner of a graduate seminar but open to undergraduate students.

InstructorsThe symbols before an instructor’s name in the list of members of a department indicate the following:

*1 absent fall semester 2007–08

*2 absent fall semester 2008–09

**1 absent spring semester 2007–08

**2 absent spring semester 2008–09

†1 absent academic year 2007–08

†2 absent academic year 2008–09

§1 director of a Junior Year Abroad Program, academic year 2007–08

§2 director of a Junior Year Abroad Program, academic year 2008–09

Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. The phrase “to be an-nounced” refers to the instructor’s name.

Meeting TimesCourse meeting times are listed in the “Schedule of Classes” distributed by the registrar before each semester. Students may not elect more than one course in a time block (see chart inside back cover), except in rare cases that involve no conflict. Where scheduled hours are not given, the times of meeting are arranged by the instructor.

Other Symbols and Abbreviationsdem.: demonstration course

lab.: laboratory

Lec.: lecture

sec.: section

dis.: discussion

( ): A department or college name in parentheses following the name of an instructor in a course listing indicates the instructor’s usual affilia-tion.

(E): An “E” in parentheses at the end of a course description designates an experimental course approved by the Committee on Academic Pri-orities to be offered not more than twice.

(C): The history department uses a “C” in parenthe-ses after the course number to designate collo-quia that are primarily reading and discussion courses limited to 20 students.

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Courses of Study 65

(L): The history department uses an “L” in parentheses after the course number to designate lectures that are unrestricted in size. Lectures and colloquia are open to all students unless otherwise indicated.

(MI): The anthropology department uses “MI” in parentheses after the course number to designate a course that is method intensive.

(TI): The anthropology department uses “TI” in parentheses after the course number to designate a course that is theory intensive.

L: The dance and theatre departments use an “L” to designate that enrollment is limited.

P: The dance and theatre departments use a “P” to designate that permission of the instructor is required.

AP: Advanced Placement. See p. 50.

S/U: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory. See p. 48.

WI Writing intensive. Each fi rst-year student is required, during her fi rst or second semester at Smith, to complete at least one writing-intensive course. See page 8 for a more complete explanation.

[ ] Courses in brackets will not be offered during the current year.

{ } Course listings in this catalogue indicate in curly brackets which area(s) of knowledge a given course covers (see pp. 7–8 for a fuller explanation). Please note that certain courses do not indicate any designation as decided by the department, program or instructor involved, e.g., English 101. Students who wish to become eligible for Latin Honors at graduation must elect at least one course

(normally four credits) in each of the seven major fi elds of knowledge; see page 7. (If a course is fewer than four credits but designated for Latin Honors, this will be indicated. This applies to those students who began at Smith in September 1994 or later and who graduated in 1998 or later.) Following is a listing of the major fi elds of knowledge as described on pages 7–8; multiple designations are separated by a slash, e.g., {L/H/F}:

L Literature:

H Historical studies

S Social science

N Natural science

M Mathematics and analytic philosophy

A The arts

F A foreign language

The course listings on pp. 67–427 are maintained by the Office of the Provost/Dean of the Faculty. For current information on courses offered at Smith, visit www.smith.edu/catalogue.

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300 Capstone Colloquium in African StudiesThis interdisciplinary Capstone Colloquium allows students to share their interests in Africa through prob-ing readings and vibrant discussions. Incorporating African studies faculty from across the Five Colleges, the course will explore both Western perceptions and lived experience in Africa through such themes as African historiographies, governance and political conflict, development and environmental issues, health and society, African literature and the arts, and youth and popular culture. Students will be asked to write frequent short papers summarizing the different disciplinary approaches to the field. Prerequisites: at least three FC courses in African studies and junior/senior standing; or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20. (E) 4 creditsDavid Newbury (History)Offered Spring 2008 at Smith College

The African Studies MinorThe African studies minor at Smith allows students to complement their major with a program that provides a systematic introduction to the complex historical, political and social issues of the African continent. The minor is structured to give the student interdisciplinary training within key fields of knowledge: literature and the arts, social science, and historical studies.

Requirements: Six semester courses on Africa are required. One course must be drawn from each of the following three fields: Arts and Literature Historical Studies Social Sciences

No more than two courses from a student’s major may be counted toward the minor. At the discretion of the adviser, equivalent courses at other colleges may be substituted for Five College courses.

Language. Students interested in African studies are encouraged to study French or Portuguese. In addition, a student who has achieved intermediate-level compe-tence in an African language may petition for this to count as one of the required courses in the field of arts, literature, and humanities.

Students with required language component may ap-ply for the Five College African Studies Certificate (see page 410).

Study Abroad. Students are encouraged to spend a semester or more in Africa. Information on current programs may be obtained from the African studies di-rector and should be discussed with the minor adviser.

African StudiesVisiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term.

Advisers and Members of the African Studies Committee:Elliot Fratkin, Professor of Anthropology, Co-Director*1 Albert Mosley, Professor of PhilosophyKatwiwa Mule, Associate Professor of Comparative Literature, Co-Director

Catharine Newbury, Professor of GovernmentDavid Newbury, Professor of African Studies and of History*1 Gregory White, Professor of GovernmentLouis Wilson, Professor of Afro-American Studies

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68 African Studies

CoursesAFS 300 Capstone Colloquium in African Studies

Arts, Literature and HumanitiesARH 130 Introduction to Art History: Africa, Oceania, and Indigenous AmericasCLT 205 Twentieth-Century Literatures of AfricaCLT 240 Childhood in the Literature of Africa and the African DiasporaCLT 266 South African Literature and FilmCLT 267 African Women’s DramaCLT 271 Writing in Translation: Bilingualism in the Post Colonial NovelCLT 305 Studies in the Novel: The Modern African Novel: Texts and IssuesCLT 315 The Feminist Novel in AfricaDAN 377 Interpretation and Analysis of African DanceECO 214 The EU, the Mediterranean, and the Middle

East: Hellenism or Bonapartism?FRN 230 Women Writers of Africa and the CaribbeanFRN 244 French Cinema: Cities of Light: Urban

Spaces in Francophone FilmPHI 254 African Philosophy

Historical StudiesHST 101 Biography in African HistoryHST 256 Introduction to West African HistoryHST 257 East Africa in the 19th and 20th CenturiesHST 258 History of Central Africa

Social SciencesAAS 202 Topics in Black Studies: Anthropology of the

African DiasporaANT 230 Africa: Population, Health and Environment IssuesANT 348 Seminar: Health in AfricaGOV 227 Contemporary African PoliticsGOV 232 Women and Politics in AfricaGOV 321 Seminar: The Rwanda Genocide in Comparative PerspectiveGOV 347 Seminar: North Africa in the International

System

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111 Introduction to Black CultureAn introduction to some of the major perspectives, themes and issues in the field of Afro-American studies. Our focus will be on the economic, social and political aspects of cultural production, and how these inform what it means to read, write about, view and listen to black culture. {S} 4 creditsRiché BarnesOffered Fall 2007

112 Methods of InquiryThis course is designed to introduce students to the many methods of inquiry used for research in interdis-ciplinary fields such as Afro-American studies. Guided by a general research topic or theme, students will be exposed to different methods for asking questions and gathering evidence. {S} 4 creditsAdrianne AndrewsOffered Spring 2008

113/ENG 184 Survey of Afro-American Literature: 1746 to 1900An introduction to the themes, issues and questions that shaped the literature of African Americans during its period of origin. Texts will include poetry, prose and works of fiction. Writers include Harriet Jacobs, Frances Harper and Charles Chesnutt, Frederick Douglass, Phil-lis Wheatley. {L} 4 creditsNot offered during 2007–08

Afro-American Studies

ProfessorsPaula J. Giddings, B.A.†1 Andrea Hairston, M.A. (Theatre and Afro-American Studies)Louis E. Wilson, Ph.D.

Associate ProfessorKevin E. Quashie, Ph.D., Chair

Adjunct Associate ProfessorCarolyn Jacobs, Ph.D.

Assistant ProfessorDaphne Lamothe, Ph.D.

LecturersRiché Barnes, M.A.James Carroll

Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term.

117 History of Afro-American People to 1960An examination of the broad contours of the history of the Afro-American in the United States from ca. 1600–1960. Particular emphasis will be given to how Africans influenced virtually every aspect of U.S. society; slavery and constitutional changes after 1865; the philosophies of W.E.B. DuBois, Booker T. Washington and Marcus Garvey, and the rise and fall of racial segregation in the United States. {H} 4 creditsLouis WilsonOffered Fall 2007

202 Topics in Black StudiesTopic: Anthropology of the African Diaspora. This course, covering an expansive global distance, histori-cal period and intellectual tradition will be divided into two parts. The first half of the course will locate and define the African diaspora and will provide a bio-cultural, historical, political and economic overview of their descendants’ origins and major movements. The second half of the course will explore how members of the African diaspora negotiate identity, construct citi-zenship, and develop nation within the Diaspora and in relation to Africa. African diasporic cultures considered may include those residing in North America (includ-ing the U.S., Mexico and Canada), Brazil, Cuba and parts of Europe. {S} 4 creditsRiché BarnesOffered Spring 2008

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70 Afro-American Studies

209 Feminism, Race and Resistance: History of Black Women in AmericaThis interdisciplinary course will explore the historical and theoretical perspectives of African American women from the time of slavery to the post-civil rights era. A central concern of the course will be the examination of how black women shaped, and were shaped by the in-tersectionality of race, gender and sexuality in American culture. Not open to first-year students. {H} 4 creditsPaula GiddingsOffered Fall 2007

211 Black Cultural TheoryThis class will explore the tensions and affinities between canonical schools of contemporary cultural theory and black cultural criticism and production. Enrollment limited to 40. {L/H} 4 creditsKevin QuashieOffered Spring 2008

212 Culture and Class in the Afro-American FamilyIn this course we will examine contemporary Afri-can-American families from both sociocultural and socioeconomic perspectives. We will explore the issues facing African American families as a consequence of the intersecting of race, class and gender categories of America. The aim of this course is to broaden the student’s knowledge of the internal dynamics and diversity of African American family life and to foster a greater understanding of the internal strengths as well as the vulnerabilities of the many varieties of African American families. {S} 4 creditsRiché BarnesOffered Spring 2008

222 Introduction to African American Music: Gospel, Blues and JazzThe course is designed to introduce the student to the various music forms and their histories within the African American community from the early 19th century to the present. Specifically, the course will focus on spirituals, folk, blues, gospel and jazz. Enrollment limited to 40. {A} 4 creditsJames CarrollOffered Fall 2007

ENG 229 African American PoetryThis survey course explores the diverse poetic contribu-tions made by African Americans. We examine several movements in poetry from the earliest black poets (Phyllis Wheatley and Lucy Terry) to contemporary

poetry published in the 21st century (Rita Dove and Elizabeth Alexander). Rather than a steady chronologi-cal march through the more than three hundred years of poetry, we will read clusters of poems that best illus-trate particular styles, movements, eras, and recurrent themes including: jazz poetry, poetry of social com-mentary, the Black Arts Movement, modernist lyrics, black feminism and avant-garde poetics. Emphasis on critical close reading and analysis. (E) {L} 4 creditsDanielle ElliottOffered Fall 2007

237/ENG 236 Twentieth Century Afro-American LiteratureA survey of the evolution of African American literature during the 20th century. This class will build on the foundations established in AAS 113, Survey of Afro-American Literature 1746 to 1900. Writers include Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, James Baldwin, Toni Morrison and Paule Marshall. {L} 4 creditsDaphne LamotheOffered Fall 2007

245/ENG 282 The Harlem RenaissanceA study of one of the first cohesive cultural movement in African American history. This class will focus on de-velopments in politics, and civil rights (NAACP, Urban League, UNIA), creative arts (poetry, prose, painting, sculpture) and urban sociology (modernity, the rise of cities). Writers and subjects will include: Zora Neale Hurston, David Levering Lewis, Gloria Hull, Langston Hughes and Nella Larsen among others. Enrollment limited to 40. {L} 4 creditsDaphne LamotheOffered Spring 2008

278 The ’60s: A History of Afro-Americans in the United States from 1954 to 1970An interdisciplinary study of Afro-American history beginning with the Brown Decision in 1954. Particular attention will be given to the factors which contributed to the formative years of “civil rights movements,” Black films and music of the era, the rise of “black nationalism,” and the importance of Afro-Americans in the Vietnam War. Recommended background: survey course in Afro-American history, American his-tory or Afro-American literature. Not open to first-year students. Prerequisite: 117 and/or 270, or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 40. {H} 4 creditsLouis WilsonOffered Spring 2008

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335 Seminar: Free Blacks in the U.S. Before 1865A study of the history of free blacks from the 17th century to the abolition of slavery in 1865. A major problem created by the establishment of slavery based on race by the 1660s was what was to be the status of free blacks. Each local and state government addressed the political, economic and even religious questions raised by having free blacks in a slave society. This course will address a neglected theme in the history of the Afro-American experience, i.e., the history of free blacks before the passage of the thirteenth amendment. Recommended background: 117. {H} 4 creditsLouis WilsonOffered Spring 2008

348/ENG 348 Black Women WritersHow does gender matter in a black context? That is the question we will ask and attempt to answer through an examination of works by such authors as Phillis Wheatley, Pauline Hopkins, Nella Larsen, Zora Hurston, Toni Morrison, Alice Walker, Gayl Jones and Audre Lorde. Prerequisite: one college-level literature course or permission of the instructor. {L} 4 creditsDaphne LamotheOffered Fall 2007

ENG 352 Seminar: The Middle Passage in Contemporary Black Literature and CulturePoet Robert Hayden described the Middle Passage of the slave trade as a “voyage through death” that trans-ported Africans across the Atlantic to the Americas. This course explores the legacy of the Middle Passage in contemporary literature and culture from 1969 to today looking at how past is made present. Through poetry, novels, short stories, film and visual art on the Middle Passage, we will consider how this historical phenom-enon works as motif in black culture and site of trauma for black artists. We will examine the ways different genres achieve particular nuances in their expressions of this voyage. Prerequisite: a 200-level course in Eng-lish or Afro-American studies. (E) {L} 4 creditsDanielle ElliottOffered Fall 2007

366 Seminar: Contemporary Topics in Afro-American Studies

Classic Black Texts (Capstone Course)This seminar will study closely a dozen or so classic texts of the black canon. The intent here will be to look at each text in its specific historical context, in its

entirety, and in relation to various trajectories of black history and intellectual formation. Though this course will necessarily revisit some works that a student might have encountered previously, its design is intended to consider these works in a more complete context than is possible in survey courses. Authors might include W.E.B. DuBois, Jean Toomer, Zora Neale Hurston, Ralph Ellison, Alice Walker, Toni Morrison, Rita Dove, Patricia Hill Collins, bell hooks, Lorraine Hansberry, Malcolm X, Marlon Riggs and Audre Lorde. This seminar serves as the capstone course required for all majors including honors thesis students. {L} 4 creditsKevin QuashieOffered Spring 2008

Toni MorrisonThis seminar will focus on Toni Morrison’s literary production. In reading her novels, essays, lectures and interviews, we will pay particular attention to three things: her interest in the epic anxieties of American identities; her interest in form, language and theory; and her study of love. {L} 4 creditsKevin QuashieOffered Fall 2007

Black Feminist TheoriesThis course will examine historical, critical and theoretical perspectives on the development of black feminist theory/praxis. The course will draw from the 19th century to the present, but will focus on the contemporary black feminist intellectual tradition that achieved notoriety in the 1970s and initiated a global debate on “Western” and global feminisms. Central to our exploration will be the analysis of the intersectional relationship between theory and practice and between race, gender and class. We will conclude the course with the exploration of various expressions of contem-porary black feminist thought around the globe as a way of broadening our knowledge of feminist theory. 4 creditsRiché BarnesOffered Fall 2007

370 Seminar: Modern Southern AfricaIn 1994 South Africa underwent a “peaceful revolu-tion” with the election of Nelson Mandela. This course is designed to study the historical events that led to this dramatic development in South Africa from 1948 to 2000. {H/S} 4 creditsLouis WilsonOffered Fall 2007

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400 Special StudiesBy permission of the department, for junior and senior majors. 1–4 creditsOffered both semesters each year

Additional Courses Related to Afro-American StudiesAs an interdisciplinary department, we encourage students to explore course opportunities in other de-partments and in the Five Colleges. Some examples are listed below. Students should check departmental entries to find out the year and semester particular courses are being offered.

AMS 102 Race MattersANT 232 Third World Politics: Anthropological PerspectivesCLT 305 Studies in the Novel: The Making of the African NovelDAN 142 Comparative Caribbean Dance IDAN 375 The Anthropology of DanceECO 230 Urban EconomicsENG 120 Growing Up Caribbean*ENG 289 Trauma, Mourning and Memory in Black Literature*GOV 311 Seminar in Urban PoliticsHST 266 The Age of the American Civil WarHST 267 The United States Since 1890HST 273 Contemporary AmericaHST 275 Intellectual History of the United StatesMUS 206 Improvising History: The Development of Jazz*PHI 210 Issues in Recent and Contemporary PhilosophyPHI 254 African PhilosophyPSY 247 Psychology of the Black Experience*SOC 213 Ethnic Minorities in America*SOC 218 Urban Politics*THE 214 Black Theatre*THE 215 Minstrel Shows**These courses are cross-listed with Afro-American Studies

The MajorRequirements for the Major Eleven four-credit courses as follows:1. Three required courses: 111, 112 and 117.2. General concentration: four 100- and 200-level

courses at least one of which must have a primary focus on the African diaspora. Courses at the 300-level may also be used when appropriate.

3. Advanced concentration: three courses organized thematically or by discipline. Of the three courses, at least one must be at the 300-level; and at least one must have a primary focus on the African

diaspora.4. The designated capstone seminar in the junior or

senior year. The course is required of all majors including honors thesis students.

The MinorRequirements for the MinorSix four-credit courses as follows:1. Two of the three required courses: 111, 112, 117.2. Four elective courses, at least one of which must

be a seminar or a 300-level class; and at least one of which must have a primary focus on the African diaspora.

Adviser for Study Abroad: Louis Wilson

HonorsDirector: Kevin Quashie

430d Thesis8 creditsFull-year course; Offered each year

431 Thesis8 creditsOffered each Fall

Requirements: The same as those for the major, with the addition of a thesis. The thesis is normally pursued in the first semester of or throughout the senior year; it substitutes for one or two of the courses listed in the major requirements above. The thesis includes a public presentation and an oral examination.

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The following courses have been revised or added to the curriculum as a result of the American Ethnicities (Diversity) Seminar held in the summers of 2003 and 2004. They represent a sampling of courses in the cur-riculum that focus on ethnic diversity in the United States.

AAS 245/ENG 282 The Harlem RenaissanceA study of one of the first cohesive cultural movement in African American history. This class will focus on de-velopments in politics, and civil rights (NAACP, Urban League, UNIA), creative arts (poetry, prose, painting, sculpture) and urban sociology (modernity, the rise of cities). Writers and subjects will include Zora Neale Hurston, David Levering Lewis, Gloria Hull, Langston Hughes and Nella Larsen among others. Enrollment limited to 40. {L} 4 creditsDaphne LamotheOffered Spring 2008

ANT 240 Anthropology of MuseumsThis course critically analyzes how the museum enter-prise operates as a social agent in both reflecting and informing public culture. The relationship between the development of anthropology as a discipline and the collection of material culture from colonial sub-jects will be investigated and contemporary practices of self-representation explored. Topics include the art/artifact debate, lynching photography, plantation museums, the formation of national and cultural identity, commodification, consumerism, repatriation, and contested ideas about authenticity and authority. The relationship of the museum to a diverse public with contested agendas will be explored through class exercises, guest speakers, a podcast student project, field trips and written assignments. Effective Spring 2008: Prerequisite: 130 or permission of the instructor. (TI) {S/H} 4 creditsNancy Marie MithloOffered Fall 2007

American Ethnicities

ARH 101 Approaches to Visual Representation (C)Topic: Advertising and Visual CultureBy analyzing advertisem*nts—from ancient Pompeian shop signs and graffiti to contemporary multimedia appropriations—this course will seek to understand how images function in a wide array of different cul-tures. In developing a historical sense of visual literacy, we’ll also explore the shifting parameters of “high” art and “low” art, the significance of advertising in con-temporary art, and the structuring principles of visual communication. {H/A} 4 creditsBarbara KellumNot offered during 2007–08

ARH 289/LAS202 Talking Back to Icons: Latino/a Artistic ExpressionThis class focuses upon Latino/a artistic cultures and the role of icons in representation. We examine visual images, poster and comic book art, music, poetry, short stories, theatre, performance art and film, asking: What is a cultural icon? Our perspective stretches across time, addressing the conquest of the Americas, the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, the annexation of Puerto Rico, the Chicano/a movement and contemporary transmigra-tion of peoples from the Caribbean. Among the icons we discuss: Che Guevara, the Virgin of Guadalupe and Selena. Prerequisite: one course in Latino/a or Latin American Art, or permission of the instructors. Reading knowledge of Spanish recommended. Enrollment lim-ited to 35. {A/L} 4 creditsDana Leibsohn and Nancy SternbachNot offered during 2007–08

EDC 200 Education in the CityThe course explores how the challenges facing schools in America’s cities are entwined with social, economic and political conditions present within the urban envi-ronment. Our essential question asks how have urban educators and policy makers attempted to provide a quality educational experience for youth when issues associated with their social environment often present

Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term.

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significant obstacles to teaching and learning? Us-ing relevant social theory to guide our analyses, we’ll investigate school reform efforts at the macro-level by looking at policy-driven initiatives such as high stakes testing, vouchers, and privatization and at the local level by exploring the work of teachers, parents, youth workers and reformers. There will be fieldwork opportu-nities available for students. Enrollment limited to 35. {S} 4 creditsSam IntratorOffered Fall 2007

ENG 239 American JourneysA study of American narratives, from a variety of ethnic traditions and historical eras, that explore the forms of movement—immigration, migration, boundary crossing—so characteristic of American life. Emphasis on each author’s treatment of the complex encounter between new or marginalized Americans and an es-tablished culture, and on definitions or interrogations of what it might mean to be or become “American.” Works by Willa Cather, Anzia Yezierska, Ralph Ellison, Frank Chin, Richard Rodrigues, Leslie Marmon Silko, Joy Kogawa, Junot Diaz, Tony Kushner and the film-makers John Sayles and Chris Eyre. {L} 4 creditsRichard MillingtonNot offered during 2007–08

MUS 205 Topics in Popular MusicTopic: Ethnicity, Race, and Popular Song in the United States from Stephen Foster to Elvis Presley.From the early 19th century Irish Melodies of Thomas Moore to contemporary hip hop, popular vocal music in the United States has been tied to processes of ethnic and racial formation. This course will examine how some ethnic and racial minorities in America (African, Jewish, Chinese, Latino) were portrayed through the medium of commercially published popular song in the period c. 1850–1950. Questions of historical and cultural context will be considered but the emphasis will be on the relationship (or nonrelationship) be-tween music and text. Readings in history, sociology, and cultural studies as well as music history. Listening, viewing videos, and consultation of on-line resources. A reading knowledge of music is not required. {A/H} 4 creditsRichard SherrNot offered during 2007–08

PHI 246 Race Matters: Philosophy, Science and PoliticsThis course will examine the origins, evolution and contemporary status of racial thinking. It will explore how religion and science have both supported and rejected notions of racial superiority; and how preexist-ing European races became generically white in Africa, Asia and the Americas. The course will also examine current debates concerning the reality of racial differ-ences, the role of racial classifications and the value of racial diversity. {H/S} 4 creditsAlbert MosleyNot offered during 2007–08

PSY 313 Research Seminar in PsycholinguisticsTopic: Language Diversity and Child Language Assessment. The seminar will focus on assessment of language development, considering issues of dialect and cultural differences, and the nature of language disorders in 3–7-year-old children. The background research, design and data from the first testing of a new diagnostic test for children who speak African American English, and from a new test for bilingual Spanish speakers, will be central topics of the seminar. Prerequi-sites: One of: PSY/PHI 213, PHI 236, PSY 233, EDC 235, or permission of instructor. {N} 4 creditsJill de VilliersOffered Spring 2009

REL 266 Colloquium: Buddhist StudiesTopic: Buddhism in America. This course will sur-vey various forms of Buddhism in America and their history, from the middle of the 19th century to the present. Topics to include: Japanese American Bud-dhist Pioneers; Buddhist and Western Thought; World Parliament of Religions (1893); Buddhist Churches of America (Jodo Shinshu); Zen and the Beats; Soka Gak-kai; Chinese Buddhism in America; Insight Meditation Movement; Buddhism of the New Immigrants; “Ti-betan” Buddhism, etc. Enrollment limited to 20. {H} 4 creditsPeter GregoryNot offered during 2007–08

SOC 213 Ethnic Minorities in AmericaThe sociology of a multiracial and ethnically diverse society. Comparative examinations of several American groups and subcultures. {S} 4 creditsGinetta CandelarioOffered Spring 2008, Spring 2009

American Ethnicities

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SOC 314 Seminar in Latina/o IdentityTopic: Latina/o Racial Identities in the United States. This seminar will explore theories of race and ethnicity and the manner in which those theories have been confronted, challenged and/or assimulated by Latina/os in the United States. Special attention will be paid to the relationship of Latina/os to the white/black dichotomy. A particular concern throughout the course will be the theoretical and empirical relationship between Latina/o racial, national, class, gender and sexual identities. Students will be expected to engage in extensive and intensive critical reading and discussion of course texts. 4 creditsGinetta CandelarioNot offered during 2007–08

SWG 260 The Cultural Work of MemoirThis course will explore how queer subjectivity inter-sects with gender, ethnicity, race and class. How do individuals from groups marked as socially subordinate or non-normative use life writing to claim a right to write? The course uses life writing narratives, published in the United States over roughly the last 30 years, to explore the relationships between politicized identities, communities and social movements. Students also practice writing memoirs. Prerequisites: SWG 150 and a literature course. {L/H} 4 creditsSusan Van DyneOffered Spring 2008

THE 213 American Theatre and DramaA survey of theatre history and practices, as well as dramatic literature, theories and criticism, and their relationship to the cultural, social and political envi-ronment of the United States from the beginning of colonial to contemporary theatre. Lectures, discussions and presentations will be complemented by video screenings of recent productions of some of the plays under discussion. {L/H/A} 4 creditsKiki GounaridouNot offered during 2007–08

THE 141 Acting IIntroduction to physical, vocal and interpretative as-pects of performance, with emphasis on creativity, con-centration and depth of expression. Enrollment limited to 14. {A} 4 creditsSec. 1 & 2: Don Jordan, Fall 2007Sec. 1 & 2: To be announced, Spring 2008Offered Fall 2007, Spring 2008

American Ethnicities

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American StudiesVisiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term.

201 Introduction to the Study of American Society and CultureAn introduction to the methods and concerns of Ameri-can Studies through the examination of a critical pe-riod of cultural transformation: the 1890s. We will draw on literature, painting, architecture, landscape design, social and cultural criticism, and popular culture to explore such topics as responses to economic change, ideas of nature and culture, America’s relation to Eu-rope, the question of race, the roles of women, family structure, social class, and urban experience. Open to

120 Scribbling WomenWith the help of the Sophia Smith Collection and the Smith College Archives, this writing intensive course looks at a number of 19th- and 20th-century Ameri-can women writers. All wrestled with specific issues that confronted them as women; each wrote about important issues in American society. Enrollment limited to 15. Priority given to first year students. {L/H} WI 4 creditsSherry MarkerOffered Spring 2008, Spring 2009

†2 Daniel Horowitz, Ph.D., Professor of American Stud-ies and of History

*1, †2 Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz, Ph.D., Professor of American Studies and of History

Richard Millington, Ph.D., Professor of English Language and Literature, DirectorDonald Leonard Robinson, Ph.D. Professor Emeritus of

Government*2 Floyd Cheung, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English

Language and LiteratureKevin Rozario, Ph.D., Associate Professor of American

Studies*2 Steve Waksman, Ph.D., Associate Professor of MusicNan Wolverton, Adjunct Assistant ProfessorW. Lane Hall-Witt, M.A., LecturerJames Hicks, Ph.D., LecturerLaura Katzman, Ph.D., LecturerW.T. Lhamon, Jr., Ph.D., LecturerSherry Marker, M.A., LecturerBunkong Tuon, M.A., Lecturer

Joan Leiman Jacobson Visiting Nonfiction WriterHilton Als

American Studies Committee**1 Rosetta Marantz Cohen, Ed.D., Professor of Education and Child Study†2 Daniel Horowitz, Ph.D., Professor of American Studies and of History*1, †2 Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz, Ph.D., Professor of

American Studies and of History

Richard Millington, Ph.D., Professor of English Language and LiteratureChristine Shelton, M.S., Professor of Exercise and Sport

StudiesSusan R. Van Dyne, Ph.D., Professor of the Study of

Women and GenderLouis Wilson, Ph.D., Professor of Afro-American StudiesGinetta Candelario, Associate Professor of Sociology

and of Latin American and Latino/a Studies*2 Floyd Cheung, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English

Language and Literature**2 Alice Hearst, J.D., Associate Professor of GovernmentAlexandra Keller, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Film

StudiesKevin Rozario, Ph.D., Associate Professor of American

Studies*2 Michael Thurston, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Eng-

lish Language and Literature*2 Steve Waksman, Ph.D., Associate Professor of MusicNina Antonetti, Assistant Professor of Landscape StudiesJustin D. Cammy, Assistant Professor of Jewish StudiesJennifer Guglielmo, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of HistoryDaphne Lamothe, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Anthropology†2 Nancy Marie Mithlo, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of

AnthropologyFrazer Ward, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of ArtSherrill Redmon, Director of the Sophia Smith Collection

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all first- and second-year students, as well as to junior and senior majors. {L/H} 4 creditsFloyd Cheung, Daniel Horowitz, Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz, Kevin Rozario, Spring 2008Offered Spring 2008, Spring 2009

202 Methods in American StudiesA multidisciplinary exploration of different research methods and theoretical perspectives (Marxist, feminist, myth-symbol, cultural studies) in American studies. Prerequisite: AMS 201 or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to American studies majors. {H/S} 4 creditsDaniel Horowitz, Kevin Rozario, Fall 2007Steve Waksman, Spring 2008Offered both semesters each year

220 Colloquium Enrollment limited to 20. 4 credits

In the ’burbs: Culture, Politics, IdentityPerhaps no single occurrence has had so broad an impact upon the overall shape of American life as the move of so much of the nation’s population to the suburbs. And perhaps no single occurrence has drawn so much criticism from concerned social commenta-tors. The suburbs are blamed for everything from the hom*ogenization of the U.S. mass culture to the prolif-eration of new forms of racial and ethnic segregation to the resurgent rise of the political right in the late 20th century. This course will start from the premise that suburbia, politically fraught though it may be, is also a cultural location of considerable complexity which has given rise both to reconstructed forms of social regula-tion and to new ways of experiencing difference and negotiating cultural conflict in the United States. We will study suburbia from multiple angles and through a range of sources, from select films and novels to eth-nographic studies of suburban life. Enrollment limited to 20. {H/S}Steve WaksmanOffered Fall 2007

Black Charisma as the Resource for American Cultural RenewalAn exploration—through a wide range of expressive forms: theater, music, literature, film—of the complex interaction between African American and Euro-American cultures in the United States. Focus on three

transformative moments: the 1830s, the 1920s and the 1950s. (E) {A/L}W.T. Lhamon, Jr.Offered Fall 2007

221 ColloquiumEnrollment limited to 20. 4 credits

Digital Ecology: American Life in the Age of the ComputerThis course seeks to formulate critical questions that are essential to an understanding of American life in the Digital Age. Our inquiries will range from broad sociological problems concerning political culture, globalization, and the organization of capitalist economies to personal questions concerning intimacy, cognitive styles and self-awareness. Most of the con-tent driving the course will focus on the digital world itself: electronic commerce, the blogosphere, virtual community, video gaming, new media, hypermedia, digital devices. However, our abiding objective will be to understand the digital phenomenon as a dimension of American life in general. W. Lane Hall-WittOffered Spring 2008

230 Colloquium: The Asian American ExperienceThrough the course of the semester, students will con-sider the many histories, experiences and cultures that shape and define the ever-changing, ever-evolving field of Asian American studies, an interdisciplinary space marked by multiple communities, approaches, voices, issues and themes. The course will cover the first wave of Asian immigration in the 19th century, the rise of anti-Asian movements, the experiences of Asian Ameri-cans duringWorld War II, the emergence of the Asian American movement in the 1960s, and the new wave of post-1965 Asian immigration. Topics will include but are not limited to racial formation, immigration, citizenship, transnationalism, gender and class. Enroll-ment limited to 20. {L} 4 creditsBukong Tuon, Spring 2008Offered Spring 2008, Spring 2009

235 American Popular CultureAn analytical history of American popular culture since 1865. We start from the premise that popular culture, far from being merely a frivolous or debased alterna-tive to high culture, is an important site of popular expression, social instruction and cultural conflict.

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We examine theoretical texts that help us to “read” popular culture, even as we study specific artifacts from television shows to Hollywood movies, the p*rnography industry to spectator sports, and popular music to theme parks. We pay special attention to questions of desire and to the ways popular culture has mediated and produced pleasure, disgust, fear and satisfaction. Alternating lecture/discussion format. Enrollment limited to 25. Admission by permission of the instruc-tor. {H/S} 4 creditsKevin RozarioOffered Spring 2008, Spring 2009

302 Seminar: The Material Culture of New England, 1630–1860Using the collections of Historic Deerfield, Inc., and the environment of Deerfield, Massachusetts, students explore the relationship of a wide variety of objects (architecture, furniture, ceramics and textiles) to New England’s history. Classes are held in Old Deerfield, MA. Admission by permission of the instructor. {H/A} 4 credits Nan WolvertonOffered Spring 2008, Spring 2009

340 Symposium in American StudiesLimited to senior majors.

The United States as a Consumer SocietyAmong the issues we will consider are: in what ways is shopping a social, moral or political experience? What does it mean to look at travel sites that offer a view of history (Historic Deerfield and Yankee Candle Com-pany, for example) as part of a consumer’s experience? What is the relationship between consumer culture and public life or political participation (such as protests against the World Trade Organization or boycotts against goods produced under oppressive conditions?) How does the experience of shopping vary with one’s race, class, gender or sexuality? {H/S} 4 creditsDaniel HorowitzOffered Fall 2007

Media CulturesManufactured images are everywhere, flickering across our computer monitors and television screens, adorn-ing billboards and buses. These images are designed to grab our attention and to motivate us to acts of consumption. But they are also a source of education

for us, instilling values and a sense of proper social behavior. Who owns these images? How do they work on our emotions and psyches? How have they shaped the organization of American political and economic life? Why is the media saturated with images of sex and violence? What is the relationship between mass cul-ture, ethics and political mobilization? What has been the role of the media in the “age of terrorism”? Texts to address these questions include novels, memoirs, pho-tographs, graffiti studies, news broadcasts, advertise-ments, histories of mass culture and theoretical studies of “the society of the spectacle.”Kevin RozarioOffered Fall 2007

341 Symposium in American StudiesLimited to senior majors.

Why Did/Do Americans Feel That Way?This course will focus on how Americans have under-stood and understand their emotions and illnesses, es-pecially those that somehow link mind and body. How have they seen, how do they see at present the mind/body problem and the nature of mental illness? We will work together to understand the ways that, guided by physicians, Americans have looked at the problem from the late 19th century until the present. We will consider the role that gender has played. Each student will de-velop an independent project dealing with some aspect of the question, past or present. Among the texts that we will consider are George Beard’s American Nervous-ness (1880) and Peter Kramer, Listening to Prozac (1993). {H} 4 creditsHelen Lefkowitz HorowitzOffered Spring 2008

351/ENG 384 Writing About American Society An examination of contemporary American issues through the works of such literary journalists as Ja-maica Kincaid, John McPhee, Tom Wolfe, Joan Didion, and Jessica Mitford; and intensive practice in expository writing to develop the student’s own skills in analyzing complex social issues and expressing herself artfully in this form. May be repeated with a different instructor and with the permission of the director of the program. Enrollment limited to 15. Admission by permission of the instructor. {L/S} 4 creditsHilton AlsOffered Spring 2008, Spring 2009

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400 Special StudiesAdmission by permission of the instructor and the director. 1 to 4 creditsOffered both semesters each year

408d Special StudiesAdmission by permission of the instructor and the director. 8 creditsFull-year course; Offered each year

Internship at the Smithsonian InstitutionTo enable qualified students to examine, under the tutelage of outstanding scholars, some of the finest collections of materials relating to the development of culture in America, the American Studies Program offers a one-semester internship at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. The academic program consists of a seminar taught by a scholar at the Smith-sonian, a tutorial on research methods, and a research project under the supervision of a Smithsonian staff member. The project is worth eight credits. Research projects have dealt with such topics as the northward migration of blacks, women in various sports, a his-tory of Western Union, Charles Willson Peale’s letters, the rise of modernism in American art, and the use of infant baby formula in the antebellum South. Interns pay tuition and fees to Smith College but pay for their own room and board in Washington. Financial aid, if any, continues as if the student were resident in Northampton. The program takes place during the fall semester. It is not limited to American studies majors. Students majoring in art, history, sociology, anthropology, reli-gion and economics are especially encouraged to apply. Those in project-related disciplines (e.g., art history) may consult their advisers about the possibility of earn-ing credit toward the major for work done on the in-ternship. Applications will be available at the beginning of the second semester.

410 Tutorial on Research Methods at the SmithsonianIndividual supervision by a Smithsonian staff member. Given in Washington, D.C. {H/S} 4 creditsDonald Robinson, Director, Fall 2007Offered Fall 2007, Fall 2008

411 Seminar: American Culture: Conventions and ContextsExhibiting Culture: An Introduction to Museum Studies in America. This seminar examines the his-tory, functions and meanings of museums in society, focusing primarily on the art museum in the United States. Drawing on the ever-growing literature on museology, we will look critically at the ways that mu-seums—through their policies, programs, architecture and exhibitions—can define regional or national val-ues, shape cultural attitudes and identities, and influ-ence public opinion about both current and historical events. As the course is concerned with both theory and practice, and the intersection of the two, we will make use of the rich resources of the Smithsonian as well as other museums in Washington, D.C. Class discussion will be balanced with behind-the-scenes visits/field trips to museums, where we will speak with dedicated professionals who are engaged in innovative and often challenging work in the nation’s capital. (Open only to members of the Smithsonian Internship Program. Given in Washington, D.C.). {H} 4 creditsLaura KatzmanOffered Fall 2007, Fall 2008

412 Research Project at the Smithsonian InstitutionTutorial supervision by Smithsonian staff members. Given in Washington, D.C. {H/S} 8 creditsDonald Robinson, Director, Fall 2007Offered Fall 2007, Fall 2008

Requirements for the American Studies MajorAdvisers: Nina Antonetti, Justin Cammy, Floyd Cheung, Rosetta Cohen, Jennifer Guglielmo, Alice Hearst, Daniel Horowitz, Helen Horowitz, Alexandra Keller, Daphne Lamothe, Richard Millington, Nancy Marie Mithlo, Kevin Rozario, Christine Shelton, Michael Thurston, Susan Van Dyne, Steve Waksman, Frazer Ward, Louis Wilson Because of the wide-ranging interests and methods included within the interdisciplinary American Studies Program, careful consultation between a student and her adviser is crucial to the planning of the major. In order to structure their studies of American society and culture, majors will select a focus—such as an era (e.g., antebellum America, the 20th century)

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or a topical concentration (e.g., ethnicity and race, urban life, social policy, material culture, the family, industrialization, the arts, the media, popular culture, comparative American cultures)—which they will explore in at least four courses. It is expected that sev-eral courses in the major will explore issues outside the theme. Because American studies courses are located pri-marily in two divisions, humanities and social sciences, students are to balance their studies with courses in each. Courses taken S/U may not be counted toward the major.

Requirements: 12 semester courses, as follows:1. 201 and 202;2. Eight courses in the American field. At least four

must be focused on a theme defined by the student. At least two courses must be in the humanities and two in the social sciences. At least two must be de-voted primarily to the years before the 20th century. At least one must be a seminar, ideally in the theme selected. (340/341 does not fulfill the seminar requirement). Students writing honors theses are exempt from the seminar requirement;

3. International comparison. In order to foster in-ternational perspectives and to allow comparisons with the American experience, all majors must take a course dealing with a nation or society other than the United States, a course preferably in the area of the student’s focus;

4. 340 or 341.

Adviser for Study Abroad: Michael Thurston

HonorsDirector: Kevin Rozario

430d Thesis8 creditsFull-year course; Offered each year

431 Thesis8 creditsOffered Fall 2007, Fall 2008

Requirements: The same as those for the major, except that a thesis (431) will be substituted for two of the eight courses in the American field. The thesis will be followed by a public presentation and an oral honors examination in the spring semester.

Diploma in American StudiesDirector: James Hicks

A one-year program for foreign students of advanced undergraduate or graduate standing.

Requirements: American Studies 555; five additional courses in American studies or in one or more of the related disciplines. Students who choose to write a thesis, and whose projects are approved, will substitute American Studies 570, Diploma Thesis, for one of the additional courses.

555 Seminar: American Society and CultureTopic: The Unexceptional U.S.: Global Readings in U.S. Culture. One of the most important trends in recent American historiography has been the growing movement to see U.S. history as part of world history. In this course, we will read and interpret in ways that move beyond national, and nationalist, readings of U.S. history. The course is divided into four clusters, each representing a different period and focusing on different aspects of U.S.-American society and culture in relation to world history. Each cluster will be organized around an interdisciplinary investigation of a single text: Mary Rowlandson’s captivity narrative, Benjamin Franklin’s autobiography, Nella Larsen’s Quicksand and Tim O’Brien’s The Things They Carried. Normally for Diploma students only. 4 creditsJames HicksOffered Fall 2007, Fall 2008

570 Diploma Thesis4 creditsJames HicksOffered Spring 2008, Spring 2009

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Ancient StudiesVisiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term.

AdvisersScott Bradbury, Professor of Classical Languages and LiteraturesPatrick Coby, Professor of GovernmentJoel Kaminsky, Associate Professor of Religion

Barbara Kellum, Professor of ArtSusan Levin, Associate Professor of Philosophy, Director†2 Richard Lim, Professor of History†1 Suleiman Mourad, Assistant Professor of Religion

The minor in ancient studies provides students with the opportunity to consolidate a program of study on the ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern worlds based on a variety of disciplinary perspectives. Courses in history, art, religion, classics, government, philosophy and archaeology make up the minor. Students shape their own programs, in consultation with their advisers, and may concentrate on a particular civilization or elect a cross-civilizational approach. No languages are required.

The MinorRequirements: Six courses, in no fewer than three departments, selected from the list of related courses below.

Related CoursesARC 211 Introduction to ArchaeologyARH 208 The Art of GreeceARH 212 Ancient Cities and SanctuariesARH 216 The Art and Architecture of the Roman

WorldARH 228 Islamic Art and ArchitectureARH 285 Great Cities: PompeiiARH 315 Studies in Roman ArtARH 352 Hellenistic Art and ArchitectureCLS 190 The Trojan WarCLS 227 Classical MythologyCLS 230 The Historical ImaginationCLS 230 Images of the Other in Ancient Greece

CLS 232 Paganism in the Greco-Roman WorldCLS 233 Gender and Sexuality in Greco-Roman CultureCLS 235 Life and Literature in Ancient RomeCLS 236 Cleopatra: Histories, Fictions, FantasiesGOV 261 Ancient and Medieval Political TheoryHST 202 Ancient GreeceHST 203 Alexander the Great and the Hellenistic WorldHST 204 The Roman RepublicHST 205 The Roman EmpireHST 206 Aspects of Ancient HistoryHST 302 Topics in Ancient HistoryJUD 285 Jews and World Civilization: 300 B.C.E.–1492

C.E.PHI 124 History of Ancient and Medieval PhilosophyPHI 324 Seminar in Ancient PhilosophyREL 210 Introduction to the Bible IREL 211 Wisdom Literature and Other Books in the

BibleREL 213 Prophecy in Ancient IsraelREL 215 Introduction to the Bible IIREL 217 Colloquium: The Dead Sea Scrolls, Judaism and ChristianityREL 219 Christian Origins: Archaeological and Socio-Historical PerspectivesREL 252 The Making of MuhammadREL 310 Seminar: Hebrew Bible

Students are to check departmental entries in the cata-logue to find out the year and semester when particular courses are being offered.

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ProfessorsDonald Joralemon, Ph.D.,Elliot Fratkin, Ph.D., Chair

Associate Professors†1, †2 Ravina Aggarwal, Ph.D.Suzanne Z. Gottschang, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor†2 Nancy Marie Mithlo, Ph.D.

AnthropologyVisiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term.

Students are strongly encouraged to complete ANT 130 before enrolling in intermediate courses. First-year students must have the permission of the instructor for courses above the introductory level.

130 Introduction to Cultural AnthropologyThe exploration of similarities and differences in the cultural patterning of human experience. The comparative analysis of economic, political, religious and family structures, with examples from Africa, the Americas, Asia and Oceania. The impact of the modern world on traditional societies. Several ethnographic films are viewed in coordination with descriptive case studies. Total enrollment of each section limited to 25. {S} 4 creditsDonald Joralemon, Suzanne Z. Gottschang, Fernando Armstrong-Fumero, Ruchi Chaturvedi, Fall 2007Nancy Marie Mithlo, Ruchi Chaturvedi, Spring 2008Donald Joralemon, Suzanne Z. Gottschang, Fernando Armstrong-Fumero, Ruchi Chaturvedi, Fall 2008Ruchi Chaturvedi, To be announced, Spring 2009Offered both semesters each year

230 Africa: Population, Health, and Environment IssuesThis course looks at peoples and cultures of Africa with a focus on population, health and environmental is-sues on the African continent. The course discusses the

origin and growth of human populations, distribution and spread of language and ethnic groups, the variety in food production systems (foraging, fishing, pastoral-ism, agriculture, industrialism), demographic, health, environmental consequences of slavery, colonialism, and economic globalization, and contemporary prob-lems of drought, famine and AIDS in Africa. Effective Spring 2008, prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 30. {S/N} 4 creditsElliot FratkinOffered Fall 2007

233 History of Anthropological TheoryThis course reviews the major theoretical approaches and directions in cultural anthropology from late 19th century to the present. These approaches include social organization and individual agency, adaptation and evolution of human culture, culture and personality, economic behavior, human ecology, the anthropol-ogy of development and change, and post-modern interpretation. The works of major anthropologists are explored including Franz Boas, Bronislaw Malinowski, Margaret Mead, Evans-Pritchard, Claude Levi-Strauss, Marvin Harris, Eric Wolf, Clifford Geertz, Sherry Ortner and others. Effective Spring 2008, prerequisite: 130 or permission of the instructor. (TI) 4 creditsElliot FratkinOffered Fall 2007

Visiting Assistant ProfessorRuchi Chaturvedi, Ph.D.

InstructorFernando Armstrong-Fumero, M.A.

Associated FacultyAdrianne Andrews, Ph.D.Margaret Sarkissian, Ph.D.

LecturerRichard Wallace, Ph.D.

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234 Culture, Power and PoliticsThis course is a general introduction to anthropologi-cal analysis of politics and the political. Through a broad survey of anthropological texts and theories, we will explore what an ethnographic perspective can offer to our understandings of power and government. Spe-cial emphasis is placed on the role of culture, symbols and social networks in the political life of local com-munities. Examples will be drawn from a number of case studies in Africa, East Asia, Latin America and the United States, and range in scale from studies of local politics in small-scale societies to analyses of national-ism and political performance in modern nation-states. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 30. {S} 4 creditsFernando Armstrong-FumeroOffered Spring 2008, Spring 2009

236 Economy, Ecology, and SocietyThis course introduces theoretical approaches to the study of economy, ecology and cultural evolution in anthropology. As a theory-intensive course, it will ex-amine varying materialist approaches to the study of society including cultural ecology, political economy, formalist and substantivist perspectives. Topics include production, exchange and consumption in non-West-ern societies, cultural evolution and historical change among tribal societies, early states, mercantilist, capi-talist and socialist polities. Enrollment limited to 30. Preference given to anthropology majors and minors and environmental science and policy minors. Not open to first year students. Prerequisite: 130 or permis-sion of the instructor. (TI) {S} 4 creditsElliot FratkinOffered Spring 2009

237 Native South Americans: Conquest and ResistanceThe differential impact of European conquest on tropical forest, Andean and sub-Andean Indian societ-ies. How native cosmologies can contribute to either cultural survival or extinction as Indians respond to economic and ideological domination. {H/S} 4 creditsDonald JoralemonOffered Spring 2008

240 Anthropology of MuseumsThis course critically analyzes how the museum enter-prise operates as a social agent in both reflecting and informing public culture. The relationship between the development of anthropology as a discipline and

the collection of material culture from colonial sub-jects will be investigated and contemporary practices of self-representation explored. Topics include the art/artifact debate, lynching photography, plantation museums, the formation of national and cultural identity, commodification, consumerism, repatriation, and contested ideas about authenticity and authority. The relationship of the museum to a diverse public with contested agendas will be explored through class exercises, guest speakers, a podcast student project, field trips and written assignments. Effective Spring 2008: Prerequisite: 130 or permission of the instructor. (TI) {S/H} 4 creditsNancy Marie MithloOffered Fall 2007

241 Anthropology of DevelopmentThe Anthropology of Development compares three ex-planatory models—modernization theory, dependency theory, and indigenous or alternative development—to understand social change today. Who sponsors devel-opment programs and why? How are power, ethnicity and gender relations affected? How do anthropologists contribute to and critique programs of social and eco-nomic development? The course will discuss issues of gender, health care, population growth, and economic empowerment with readings from Africa, Asia, Oceania and Latin America. Enrollment limited to 30. Prefer-ence given to Anthropology majors and minors. Not open to first-year students. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 30. {S} 4 creditsElliot FratkinOffered Fall 2008

245 Tales of Cannibalism and Capital in Latin AmericaThis course introduces students to issues of coloniality, race and class relations and political economy in Latin America. The unifying thread will be a series of folklore traditions that ascribe cannibalistic or vampiric prac-tices to the social systems through which agrarian and hunter-gatherer populations are incorporated into wage labor and the global economy. Major topics include the cultural roots of modernity, Marxian anthropology, dependency theory, cultural resistance, narratives of conquest and colonization, globalization, and notions of personhood and the body. Specific ethnographic examples include studies of several populations from highland Bolivia, Toba hunter-gatherers from northern Argentina, Afro-Columbian peasants, medical stations on the U.S./Mexico border, and urban slums in Brazil.

Anthropology

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Effective Spring 2008: Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 30. {S} 4 creditsFernando Armstrong-FumeroOffered Fall 2007

248 Medical AnthropologyThe cultural construction of illness through an exami-nation of systems of diagnosis, classification, and ther-apy in both non-Western and Western societies. Special attention given to the role of the traditional healer. The anthropological contribution to international health care and to the training of physicians in the United States. Enrollment limited to 30. {S/N} 4 creditsDonald JoralemonOffered Fall 2007, Fall 2008

250 Native American RepresentationsThis course offers an overview of the historic and contemporary experiences of Native people in North America through an examination of oral history, biography, art, ethnographic texts, film and scholarly analysis. The impact of government policies, including boarding schools, adoption and relocation, will be dis-cussed as well as tribal self determination efforts such as cultural resource management, language retention and enrollment policies. The articulation of indigenous knowledge systems in understanding environmental, health and educational issues will be highlighted as well as varying ideas of gender and power. Native American women’s life histories and perspectives will be emphasized. {S} 4 creditsNancy Marie MithloOffered Spring 2008

253 Introduction to East Asian Societies and CulturesThis course provides a survey of the anthropology of contemporary East Asian societies. We will examine the effects of modernization and development on the cultures of China, Japan and Korea. Such topics as the individual, household and family; marriage and re-production; religion and ritual; and political economic systems are introduced through ethnographic accounts of these cultures. The goal of this course is to provide students with sufficient information to understand important social and cultural aspects of modern East Asia. {S} 4 creditsSuzanne Z. GottschangOffered Fall 2008

255 Dying and DeathDeath, the “supreme and final crisis of life” (Ma-linowski), calls for collective understandings and communal responses. What care is due the dying? What indicates that death has occurred? How is the corpse to be handled? The course uses ethnographic and histori-cal sources to indicate how human communities have answered these questions and to determine just how unusual are the circ*mstances surrounding dying in the contemporary Western world. Enrollment limited to 30. Prerequisite: 130. Limited to anthropology majors and minors or by permission of the instructor. Prereq-uisite: 130 or permission of the instructor. (TI) {H/S} 4 creditsDonald JoralemonOffered Spring 2009

258 Performing CultureThis course analyzes cultural performances as sites for the expression and formation of social identity. Stu-dents study various performance genres such as rituals, festivals, parades, cultural shows, music, dance and theater. Topics include expressive culture as resistance; debates around authenticity and heritage; the perfor-mance of race, class and ethnic identities; the construc-tion of national identity; and the effects of globalization on indigenous performances. Enrollment limited to 30. Prerequisite: 130 or permission of the instructor. (MI) {A/S} 4 creditsMargaret SarkissianOffered Spring 2008

266 Doing Ethnography: Research Methods in AnthropologyIn this course, we examine anthropological fieldwork techniques including participant observation, eth-nographic filmmaking, and both “open-ended” and directed interviewing, as well as qualitative approaches to the cultural analysis of data. Topics will include research design, ethical dilemmas, field techniques, and applied anthropology. This is a doing course: self-designed ethnographic research projects will be integral to the course. Effective Spring 2008, prerequisite: 130 or permission of the instructor. (E) {S} 4 creditsRichard Wallace, Fall 2007Ruchi Chaturvedi, Fall 2008Offered Fall 2007, Fall 2008

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267 Power, History and Communities in South AsiaThis course proceeds from the early anthropologi-cal writings on religion and caste groups and village and kin-based studies that sought to delineate the structure and function of social organization in South Asia. Through work of historical anthropologists, we will go on to study how colonial interventions and its structures of power worked to order social networks and alliances, as well as ideas and opinions that communi-ties hold about themselves in late colonial South Asia. Postcolonial South Asia has witnessed the emergence of new political languages and groups. Their own desire for recognition and power, which have often led to violent revolts against established nationalist concor-dances and state hegemony, will be our subject of study in the latter half of the course. (E) {S} 4 creditsRuchi ChaturvediOffered Spring 2008, Spring 2009

268 Anthropology of Contemporary WarfareDo we know what war is? Do we know what causes it, how is it organized, how both armed combatants and civilians who are often the unarmed victims of war experience it? We will seek to answer these questions through a range of anthropological and historical studies. We will examine the logics of colonialism, imperatives of state formation and the so-called new world order, the forms of mass violence and individual terror they generate, and how that violence continues to shoot through everyday life. {S} 4 creditsRuchi ChaturvediOffered Spring 2008

269 Indigenous Cultures and the State in MesoamericaThis course is a general introduction to the relationship between indigenous societies and the state in Meso-america. Taking a broad historical perspective, we will explore the rise of native state-level societies, the trans-formations that marked the process of European colo-nization, and of the relationship of local indigenous communities to post-colonial states and trans-national social movements. Texts used in the course will place special emphasis on continuities and changes in lan-guage, social organization, cosmology and identity that have marked the historical experience of native groups in the region. {S} 4 creditsFernando Armstrong-FumeroOffered Fall 2008

Seminars340 Seminar: Topics in Anthropology

Witchcraft, Sorcery and Modern Communities of FearDrawing on the anthropology of phenomena such as witchcraft and sorcery, this course examines feelings of suspicion, doubt and distrust as they pervade lives of people in modern nation-states and communi-ties. Anthropological works on witchcraft and sorcery heighten our awareness of forms of distrust and doubt inherent in social life. Studies of these practices in contemporary times foreground the ways in which the forces of colonialism, nationalism and capital forma-tion generate communities of people who are not just distrustful and fearful of each other, but whose fear of the other consistently erupts into different forms of violence. {S} 4 creditsRuchi ChaturvediOffered Fall 2007

Anthropology and HistoryThis course explores the intersections between an-thropology and history. The interdisciplinary reading list will consist of historical and ethnohistorical texts written by anthropologists, social and cultural analyses written by historians and theoretical discussions that explore the intersections between the two disciplines. Special emphasis will be placed on how we can under-stand culture in historical terms or on how we can use insights from anthropology to understand the cultures of the past. Other topics will include the relationship between oral and written forms of history, processes of cultural change, and how material culture and other non-linguistic symbols can serve as a means of preserv-ing collective memory. {S} 4 creditsFernando Armstrong-FumeroOffered Spring 2008, Spring 2009

Human Rights in Violent TimesThis seminar examines the career of human rights discourse and practices in the light of different forms of political violence that the world has witnessed since World War II. Has the human rights discourse been able to face up to the demands for political freedom and justice; when and how has it fallen short? How do human rights configure the relationship between individuals, their communities and nation-states? How

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have the arguments about cultural relativism and universality of human rights influenced each other? And, how has the human rights framework played itself out in war crime tribunals, truth commissions, etc., in post-conflict societies of Africa, Latin America and East-ern Europe? In this seminar, we will seek to answer these questions by drawing on anthropological and historical writings on these societies, and analytical treatises on rights, violence and transitional justice. {S} 4 creditsRuchi ChaturvediOffered Spring 2009

342 Seminar: Topics in AnthropologyTopic: Traditional Chinese Medicine: Transforma-tions and Transitions in China, Japan and the U.S. With a history of over 4,000 years, Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is often perceived as a timeless, unchanging medical tradition. TCM, however, has undergone numerous transitions and transformations throughout its history. TCM has also traveled through-out the world where its principles and theories have been adopted in the development of medical systems in Japan and Korea among others. In the past 30 years, TCM has gained increasing popularity and credibility in the United States and Europe. This course examines how Traditional Chinese Medicine, much as any medi-cal system of theory and practice, responds to historical and contemporary social, economic and political forces within China and in countries such as Japan and the United States. Students will explore the broad question as to what constitutes TCM through time and across cultures as a means to better understand the processes of translation and transformation of theories, beliefs and practices in different cultural, political, economic and social contexts. {S} 4 creditsSuzanne Z. GottschangOffered Spring 2008

344 Seminar: Topics in Medical AnthropologyTopic: Theory in the Social Sciences of Medicine. A selective review of social science theory applied to sick-ness and healing, drawing material from anthropology and sociology. Key themes include the concept of the “sick role,” the impact of class and ethnicity on disease patterns, the social structure of medical systems, medi-cal ecology, and world systems models applied to health and disease. Prerequisite: ANT 248 or permission of the instructor. (TI) {S} 4 creditsDonald JoralemonOffered Spring 2008, Spring 2009

347 Seminar: Topics in AnthropologyTopic: Ethnographic Film Studies. This course consid-ers the history and development of ethnographic and transcultural filmmaking. It is an in-depth exploration of important anthropological films in terms of content, methodology and techniques. The multiple and some-times conflicting motivations of filmmakers, subjects, sponsors and audience will be examined with a consid-eration given to the challenges of new anthropological paradigms and indigenous media productions. Issues of gender, authorship and power are discussed through screenings, lecture, ethnographies, theoretical readings and classroom discussions. Students will develop a critical perspective for viewing films, videos and repre-sentations. This course requires additional weekly film screenings outside of class. {H/S} 4 creditsNancy Marie MithloOffered Fall 2007

348 Seminar: Topics in Development Anthropology

Indigenous Systems of Healing in AfricaThis seminar focuses on the variety of healing systems in Africa. We approach the issue of healing in Africa from an anthropological perspective where concepts of health, illness and therapies are embedded in cultural, social and historical contexts of the particular societies practicing them. Topics include the internal logic and practices of indigenous healing systems including both empirical practices of herbal medicines, midwifery, and bone setting to spiritually based therapies including divination, trance and drumming, ancestor worship, sorcery and witchcraft. The course will also examine the integration of, and contradictions between, tradi-tional and Western approaches to healing, particularly in areas of reproductive health, mental illness and HIV/AIDS. Prerequisite: ANT 230 or permission of the instructor. {S} 4 creditsElliot FratkinOffered Spring 2008

Anthropology and Non-Government OrganizationsThis course looks at the roles anthropologists play in the development practices of government and non-government organizations. Particular experiences and contributions of anthropologists to projects in health, women and development, food and humanitarian relief, human rights and advocacy are read and dis-cussed. Students will conduct independent research projects investigating and critiquing particular projects

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anthropologists have engaged in with organizations such as Oxfam International, United Nations Develop-ment Program or the United States Agency for Interna-tional Development. Prerequisite: ANT 241 or permis-sion of the instructor. {S} 4 creditsElliot FratkinOffered Spring 2009

Cross-listed and Interdepartmental CoursesAAS 202 Topics in Black StudiesTopic: Anthropology of the African DiasporaRiché BarnesOffered Spring 2008

MUS 220 Topics in World MusicTopic: Popular Music of the Islamic WorldMargaret SarkissianOffered Fall 2007

MUS 220 Topics in World MusicTopic: Women in Sub-Saharan African MusicBode OmojolaOffered Spring 2008

General Courses400 Special StudiesBy permission of the department, for junior and senior majors. 2 to 4 creditsOffered both semesters each year

408d Special Studies8 creditsFull-year course; Offered each year

The Major in AnthropologyAdvisers: Elliot Fratkin, Donald Joralemon, Nancy Ma-rie Mithlo, Suzanne Z. Gottschang

Advisers for Study Abroad: Africa and other areas: Elliot Fratkin; Asia: Suzanne Z. Gottschang; Latin America: Donald Joralemon

Requirements: Eight (8) courses in anthropology and three (3) that may be in anthropology or in related fields. Majors must take “Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (130), one course designated or approved as “theory intensive” (TI), one course designated or approved as “methods intensive” (MI), and a Smith anthropology seminar. In addition, students are strongly encouraged to study a language spoken in the geographic region of her interest. Students majoring in anthropology are encouraged to consider an academic program abroad during their junior year. In the past, majors have spent a term or year in India, Kenya, Senegal, South Africa, Scotland, Ecuador, Mexico, Costa Rica and Nepal. Students plan-ning to spend the junior year abroad should take at least one but preferably two courses in anthropology during the sophom*ore year. Students should discuss their study abroad plans with advisers, particularly if they wish to do a special studies or senior thesis upon their return. Majors interested in archaeology or physical anthropology may take advantage of the excellent resources in these two areas at the University of Massa-chusetts or enroll in a fieldwork program at a training university during their junior year.

The Minor in AnthropologyAdvisers: Elliot Fratkin, Donald Joralemon, Nancy Ma-rie Mithlo, Suzanne Z. Gottschang

Requirements: Six (6) courses in anthropology, includ-ing 130, and a Smith anthropology seminar. Minors are encouraged to include either a theory or methods intensive course.

HonorsDirector: To be announced

430d Thesis8 creditsFull-year course; Offered each year

431 Thesis8 creditsOffered each Fall

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432d Thesis12 creditsFull-year course; Offered each year

Requirements:1. A total of eight courses above the basis, including

130 and all the requirements for the major.2. A thesis (430, 432) written during two semesters, or

a thesis (431) written during one semester.3. An oral examination on the thesis.

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Archaeology

Advisory CommitteeScott Bradbury, Professor of Classical Languages and LiteraturesBosiljka Glumac, Associate Professor of GeologyJoel Kaminsky, Associate Professor of ReligionBarbara Kellum, Professor of ArtDana Leibsohn, Associate Professor of Art†2 Richard Lim, Professor of History, DirectorChristopher Loring, Director of Libraries

†2 Nancy Mithlo, Assistant Professor of Anthropology†2 Thalia Pandiri, Professor of Classical Languages and Literatures and of Comparative LiteratureNeal Salisbury, Professor of HistoryMarjorie Senechal, Professor of Mathematics†1 Suleiman Mourad, Assistant Professor of Religion

LecturerSusan Allen, Ph.D.

Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term.

The interdepartmental minor in archaeology is a com-plement to any one of several departmental majors. Archaeological methods and evidence can be used to illuminate various disciplines and will aid the student in the analysis of information and data provided by field research.

FYS 153 Excavating WomenThe interdisciplinary seminar will explore a little-known area in the history of archaeology: the partici-pation and legacy of women from the time of Thomas Jefferson to today. Students will learn by analyzing the lives, achievements and experiences of women who devoted themselves to this pursuit or advanced it through their support of those who did. The class in-volves students in the professor’s innovative methodol-ogy, archival archaeology and current area of research. Enrollment limited to 15. (E) WI {H/S} 4 creditsSusan Heuck AllenOffered Spring 2008

211 Introduction to ArchaeologyAn introduction to interdisciplinary archaeological inquiry. The goals of archaeology; concepts of time and space; excavation techniques; ways of ordering and studying pottery, skeletal remains, stone and metal objects and organic materials. Archaeological theory and method and how each affects the reconstruction of the past. Illustrative material, both prehistorical and historical, will be drawn primarily but not exclusively

from the culture of the Mediterranean Bronze Age and the time of Homer. Enrollment limited to 30. {H/S} 4 creditsSusan AllenOffered Spring 2008

400 Special StudiesBy permission of the Archaeology Advisory Committee, for junior or senior minors. 2 or 4 creditsOffered both semesters each year

The MinorRequirements:1. ARC 211.2. A project in which the student works outside of a

conventional classroom but under appropriate su-pervision on an archaeological question approved in advance by the Advisory Committee. The project may be done in a variety of ways and places; for example, it may be excavation (field work), or work in another aspect of archaeology in a museum or laboratory, or in an area closely related to archaeol-ogy such as geology or computer science. Students are encouraged to propose projects related to their special interests.

This project may be, but does not need to be, one for which the student receives academic credit. If

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the project is an extensive one for which academic credit is approved by the Registrar and the Advisory Committee, it may count as one of the six courses required for this minor.

3. Four additional courses (if the archaeological proj-ect carries academic credit) or five (if the archaeo-logical project does not carry academic credit) are to be chosen, in consultation with the student’s adviser for the minor, from the various departments represented on the Advisory Committee (above) or from suitable courses offered elsewhere in the Five Colleges. Please consult with an archaeology adviser regarding the list of such courses.

No more than two courses counting toward the student’s major program may be counted toward the archaeology minor. Only four credits of a language course may be counted toward the minor.

Archaeology

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ArtVisiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term.

ProfessorsMarylin Martin Rhie, Ph.D. (Art and East Asian Studies)**1 Dwight Pogue, M.F.A.*1 Gary L. Niswonger, M.Ed., M.F.A.*1 Craig Felton, Ph.D. Susan Heideman, M.F.A.*1 John Davis, Ph.D.Barbara A. Kellum, Ph.D., ChairA. Lee Burns, M.S., M.F.A., Associate Chair**1 Brigitte Buettner, Ph.D.

Kennedy Professor in Renaissance StudiesCaroline Elam, Ph.D.

Professor-in-ResidenceBarry Moser, B.S.

Associate ProfessorsJohn Moore, Ph.D.Dana Leibsohn, Ph.D.Lynne Yamamoto, M.A.

Harnish Visiting ArtistPaola Ferrario, M.F.A.

Assistant ProfessorsFrazer Ward, Ph.D.Fraser Stables, M.F.A.**2 André Dombrowski, Ph.D.

Visiting Assistant ProfessorLinda Kim, Ph.D.

Senior LecturerJohn Gibson, M.F.A.

LecturersCarl Caivano, M.F.A.Katherine Schneider, M.F.A.Martin Antonetti, M.S.L.S.Kirin Joya Makker, M.A., M.Arch.Ajay Sinha, Ph.D.Christine Geiler Andrews, Ph.D.Jonathan Katz, Ph.D.

The Department of Art believes that visual literacy is crucial to negotiations of the contemporary world. Con-sequently, equal weight is given to studio practice and historical analysis. Courses focus on images and the built environment and seek to foster an understanding of visual culture and human expression in a given time and place. Students planning to major or to do honors work in art will find courses in literature, philosophy, religion, and history taken in the first two years to be most valu-able. A reading knowledge of foreign languages is use-ful for historical courses. Each of the historical courses may require one or more trips to Boston, New York or other places in the vicinity for the study of original works of art. Courses in the history of art are prefixed ARH; courses in studio art are prefixed ARS.

A. The History of Art

Introductory CoursesCourses at the 100 level are open to all students; there are no prerequisites.

ARH 101 Approaches to Visual Representation (C)Emphasizing discussion and short written assignments, these colloquia have as their goal the development of art historical skills of description, analysis and interpre-tation. Each section is limited to 18 with priority given to first- and second-year students.

The Home as a Work of ArtUsing examples of domestic design throughout the world and the ages, we will examine in detail various

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facets of the setting and the building, its spatial orga-nization, materials and accoutrements, and the way it serves and represents ideas about gender, the family as a social and productive unit, and moral and aesthetic values. Enrollment limited to 16. {H/A} 4 creditsLinda KimOffered Fall 2007

Art and DeathThrough an examination of key architectural, sculpted, and painted monuments from a variety of different cul-tures we will study funerary beliefs and rituals, asking how art has been mobilized across the ages to frame the disruptive experience of death. {H/A} WI 4 creditsBrigitte BuettnerOffered Fall 2007

Buddhist ArtSelected themes and monuments of Buddhist art from India, China and Japan, introducing the stupa, images of the Buddha and Bodhisattva, narrative relief, cave temple art, painting and temple architecture. {H/A} WI 4 creditsMarylin RhieOffered Fall 2007

Writing Art/Art WritingThis class will introduce students to a wide range of art objects and ways of writing about them, considering both art and writing from various historical periods, and including different cultural and disciplinary perspectives. The class will consider writing—always together with the objects it seeks to understand—from within art history, as well as artists’ writing fiction, popular media, and texts from disciplines including anthropology, sociology and philosophy. Topics may in-clude: indigenous critiques of anthropological writing about Australian aboriginal art, and the reception of aboriginal art within contemporary art; artists’ writings in relation to criticism of their works, and in relation to biographical and fictional accounts of their lives; the ways in which scholarship appropriates fragmentary ancient material; poetry that takes visual art as its start-ing point; visual art that is primarily textual. Students will learn to assess what is at stake in different ways of writing about art, in relation to the contexts in which both the art and the writing appear. {A/H} WI 4 creditsFrazer WardOffered Spring 2008

CitiesCharacteristic forms and building types, and the ritual, symbolic, political, economic and cultural signification of cities. Examples drawn from different historical pe-riods, with primary focus on Europe and the Americas. We shall examine the multiple, competing forces that encouraged, effected, constrained or thwarted change in the layout and life of cities. {H/A} 4 creditsJohn MooreOffered Spring 2008

Realism: The Desire to Record the WorldThroughout history, artists have sought to re-create the natural world; indeed “Realism” has been a driving force behind representation from the earliest human-made images to the invention of photography to com-puter-generated pictures. In some cases, this Realist intention has meant designing the built environment to human scale; in others it has meant trying to record seasonal changes and simple human activities; in oth-ers still Realism has been used to suggest the presence of the divine in everyday objects. Whether accurately or symbolically, through the blatant use of materials or through virtuoso trickery, artists have consistently tried to transfer scenes from the “real world” onto other surfaces or sites. This course will explore the artistic motivation of Realism formally, thematically and contextually from ancient times to the present. {H/A} 4 creditsChristine AndrewsOffered Fall 2007, Spring 2008

ARH 120 Introduction to Art History: AsiaThis course presents a survey of the art of Asia by exploring the major periods, themes, monuments of architecture, painting and sculpture and the philo-sophical and religious underpinnings from the earliest times to the 18th century. Study will be centered on the art of India, China and Japan with some attention given to Central Asia, Tibet, Sri Lanka, Indonesia and Korea. Enrollment limited to 40. {H/A} 4 creditsAjay SiinhaOffered Fall 2007

ARH 140 Introduction to Art History: Western TraditionsThis course examines a selection of key buildings, images and objects created from the prehistoric era, the ancient Mediterranean and medieval times, to European and American art of the last 500 years. Over

Art

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the semester we will study specific visual and cultural traditions at particular historical moments and become familiar with basic terminology, modes of analysis and methodologies in art history. Enrollment limited to 40. {H/A} 4 creditsCraig FeltonOffered Spring 2008

Lectures and ColloquiaGroup I

ARH 205 Inka and Aztec: Visual Culture and Imperial DesireWhat is an ancient empire? How do contemporary ideas about sacrifice and the sacred, about land and luxury, shape our knowledge of imperial states and their ambi-tions? This course addresses these questions by focusing upon two imperial projects in the Americas—the Inka and the Aztec. In addition to pre-Hispanic images, objects and urban environments, we discuss relation-ships between gender, labor and imperial art; how tour-ism both preserves and makes Inka history; the politics of exhibiting Aztec visual culture; and distinctions between indigenous, popular and academic modes of interpretation. All required reading and assignments are in English; written work will be accepted in English or Spanish. {H/A} 4 creditsDana LeibsohnOffered Spring 2008

ARH 285 Great Cities (L)Topic: Pompeii. A consideration of the ancient city: architecture, painting, sculpture and objects of every-day life. Women and freedpeople as patrons of the arts will be emphasized. The impact of the rediscovery of Pompeii and its role as a source of inspiration in 18th, 19th, and 20th century art will also be discussed. No prerequisite. {H/A} 4 creditsBarbara KellumOffered Fall 2007

Group II

ARH 220 Art Historical Studies (C)Topic: Relics and Reliquaries. An interdisciplinary study of the cult of relics—one of the most distinctive and complex phenomena in the social, religious and artistic life of the Middle Ages. Using both primary texts and the rich body of scholarly literature, we will

examine a broad range of reliquaries—whether ab-stract or shaped into a body part; purely ornamental or enhanced with narrative scenes; made of humble or of luxury materials. Issues will include the evolv-ing understanding of relics’ nature and powers; the development of Christian pilgrimages to holy shrines; the dynamic relationship between the visible and the invisible; relic-collections as forerunners of museums and pilgrims as the predecessors of tourists. Class will include a required trip to the MET and will mount a small exhibit in the Smith College Museum of Art showcasing a newly acquired reliquary. {H/A} 4 creditsBrigitte BuettnerOffered Fall 2007

ARH 222 The Art of China (L)The art of China and peripheral regions as expressed in painting, sculpture, architecture, porcelain and the ritual bronzes. The influence of India is studied in con-nection with the spread of Buddhism along the trade routes of Central Asia. {H/A} 4 creditsMarylin RhieOffered Spring 2008

EAS 270 Colloquium in East Asian StudiesTopic: Art of Korea. Architecture, sculpture, painting and ceramic art of Korea from Neolithic times to the 18th century. {A/H} 4 creditsMarylin RhieOffered Fall 2007Counts toward Group II history of art courses.

Group III

ARH 240 Art Historical Studies (C)

Magnificence and the Arts in Medicean Florence, c.1450–1500 (C)Pending CAP approvalThis course will examine the extraordinary achieve-ments of Florentine visual culture in the fifteenth century (painting, drawing, sculpture, architecture, manuscript illumination, prints, woodwork and the so-called decorative arts) as the product of various kinds of interaction and collaboration: between patrons and artists; between masters, apprentices and work-shops; between practioners of the various arts of design; between humanists, poets and artists. The patronage of successive members of the Medici family (Cosimo il Vecchio, Piero and Giovanni di Cosimo, Lorenzo the

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Magnificent) will be analysed, as well as the change in cultural climate after the expulsion of the Medici in 1494, and the influence of the millenarian preacher, Girolamo Savonarola. The many artists to be discussed will include Filippo and Filippino Lippi, Baldovinetti, the Pollaiuolo brothers, Verrocchio, Leonardo da Vinci, Botticelli, Ghirlandaio, Giuliano da Sangallo, Piero di Cosimo and the young Michelangelo. {H/A} 4 creditsCaroline ElamOffered Spring 2008

History of the Decorative Arts, 1400–1800Costly raw materials and boundlessly creative work-manship were expended to fashion and acquire cameos and engraved gems, ceramics, clothing, embroidery, enamel, furniture, ivory, jewelry, manuscripts, medals, metalwork, printed books with luxurious bindings and tapestries. This course will examine these and other “minor” arts with an eye toward reconstructing their rich cultural, symbolic and aesthetic charge; their role in the conduct of diplomacy and statecraft; and origi-nal contexts of production, marketing, patronage, use, collecting and display. This course includes required field trips. {H/A} 4 creditsJohn MooreOffered Spring 2008

Dreaming of Italy The course charts the varying dreams Italy engendered over the course of four centuries. Sixteenth-century artists were drawn to the remains of classical antiquity. Their 17th-century successors set the trend for ideal-ized visions of the “campagna.” However, by the end of the 19th century rather than being the locus of perfect harmony, Italy had become a splendid backdrop to in-tense longing and melancholy dreams. The coursework will be supported by a concurrent exhibition from the SCMA’s permanent collection and local loans. Prereq-uisite: ARH 101 or ARH 140 or equivalent. Offered first half of the semester only. (E) {H/A} 2 creditsHenk van OsOffered Fall 2007

ARH 242 Early Italian Renaissance Art (L)The reawakening of the arts in Italy with the forma-tion of new religious organizations and the gradual emergence of political units will be studied through theoretical and stylistic considerations in sculpture, beginning with the work of the Pisani, and followed by the revolutionary achievements in painting of Giotto

(in Padua and Florence) and Duccio (in Siena) which will inform the art of generations to come. A revival of interest in the liberal arts tradition and the classical past beginning at the end of the 14th century in Flor-ence, leading to the period known as the Renaissance during the following century. The course will examine such architectural designers as Brunelleschi and Al-berti; sculptors such as Donatello and Verrocchio; and the painters Masaccio, Fra Angelico, Piero della Franc-esca and Botticelli, among others, within the context of the flowering of humanist courts in Florence, Urbino, Mantua and Ferrara. {H/A} 4 creditsCraig FeltonOffered Fall 2007

ARH 250 Building Baroque Europe (L)European architectural, urban and landscape design from (precisely) 1537 to about 1750. Specific topics in-clude Tuscany under the first three grand dukes; Rome in the 17th century; France under the first three Bour-bon kings; the rebuilding of London after the Great Fire; the significant enlargement or establishment of capital cities (Turin, Amsterdam, Versailles, Stockholm, St. Petersburg, Dresden, Berlin, Vienna); the rise of the English country house; the English landscape garden; palaces, pilgrimage churches, and monastic complexes in Bavaria, Franconia and Austria. Focus throughout on the fundamental interdependence of architecture and society. {H/A} 4 creditsJohn MooreOffered Fall 2007

Group IV

ARH 260 Art Historical Studies (C)

Representing Queerness in 20th-Century American Art (C)Pending CAP ApprovalThis course interrogates the import of sexual difference in American art from the turn of the last century up to the present. Long before (hom*o)sexuality could be spoken about openly, it was represented, sometimes in ways legible only to those who knew what to look for, but also, to a striking degree, quite openly. Images of sexual difference could be social realist (George Bel-lows), abstract (Marsden Hartley), symbolist (Georgia O’Keefe), assemblage (Robert Rauschenberg), Pop (Andy Warhol) or minimal (Agnes Martin), and would include major figures in photography, film, installation

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and performance. Enrollment limited to 18. {H/A} 4 creditsJonathan D. KatzOffered Fall 2007

African-American ArtPending CAP ApprovalThis course traces the history of African American art, beginning with several key culture groups in Africa and extending into the African-inspired material culture of slaves and, later, encompassing the works of formally trained as well as self-taught painters, sculptors, pho-tographers and artists working in multimedia up to the present. Special emphasis will be placed upon the reso-nances of African artistic traditions in African American art. These works will be situated within the contexts of critical race theory, social and political movements, collectors and patrons, early critics and theorists of the black avant-garde, influential exhibitions, and the opposition between elite and popular cultures.Enrollment limited to 18. {H/A} 4 creditsLinda KimOffered Spring 2008

ARH 264 Arts in North America: Colonial Period to Civil War (L)Art and architecture of the English colonies, the early U.S. republic, and the antebellum period. Emphasis on the cultural significance of portraiture, the develop-ment of national and regional schools of genre and landscape painting, and the changing stylistic modali-ties in architecture. Prerequisite: one 100-level art his-tory course, or permission of the instructor. {H/A} 4 creditsLinda KimOffered Fall 2007

ARH 265 Arts in the United States after the Civil War (L)Art and architecture of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Exploration of the cultural legacy of the Civil War, the cosmopolitan arts of the Gilded Age, the development of early modernism, and the expansive years during and after World War II. Recommended background: ARH 101 or 140. {H/A} 4 creditsLinda KimOffered Spring 2008

ARH 272 Art and Revolution in Europe, 1789–1889This course surveys the major trends in European painting and scupture—including some urbanism

and visual culture—of the tumultuous century fol-lowing the French Revolution of 1789. Starting with Jacques-Louis David and revolutionary iconoclasm, we will end with Post-Impressionism and the spectacular cast-iron construction of the Eiffel Tower for the 1889 Paris World’s Fair. Throughout, we will recover the original radicality of art’s formal and conceptual in-novations during the 19th century: confidently overt brush-work, a mingling of high and low, and an aesthetization of politics, empire, sexuality, technology and modernity. Prerequisite: a 100-level course in art history, or permission of the instructor. {H/A} 4 creditsAndré DombrowskiOffered Fall 2007

ARH 281 Modernism and the Neo-Avant-Gardes, 1945–68 (L)This course surveys major developments in interna-tional art framed by the end of World War II, the emer-gence of postcolonial states in the post-war period and the social movements of the 1960s. Movements in art from abstract expressionism to the art of institutional critique are considered in relation to their international reception and adaptation, their rhetorical, cultural, social and political contexts and in terms of transfor-mations in ideas of modernism and the avant-garde. Not open to students who have taken ARH 279. Prereq-uisite: one 100-level art history course or permission of the instructor. {H/A} 4 creditsFrazer WardOffered Spring 2008

ARH 283 Architecture Since 1945 (L)This course presents a global survey of architecture and urbanism since 1945, from post-World War II reconstruction and planning, through critiques of modernism, to postmodernism, deconstruction, critical regionalism and beyond. Major buildings, projects, movements and tendencies are examined in their historical , theoretical and rhetorical contexts. Prereq-uisite: ARH 101 or 140. {H/A} 4 creditsFrazer WardOffered Fall 2007

Other 200-Level CoursesARH 292/ENG 293 The Art and History of the Book (C)A survey of the book—as vehicle for the transmission of both text and image—from the manuscripts of the middle ages to contemporary artists’ books. The course

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will examine the principal techniques of book produc-tion—calligraphy, illustration, papermaking, typog-raphy, bookbinding—as well as various social and cultural aspects of book history, including questions of censorship, verbal and visual literacy, the role of the book trade, and the book as an agent of change. In addition, there will be labs in printing on the handpress and bookbinding. Admission limited to 20 by permis-sion of the instructor. {H/A} 4 creditsMartin AntonettiOffered Fall 2007

ARH 294 Art History—Methods, Issues, Debates (C)An examination of the work of the major theorists who have structured the discipline of art history. Recom-mended for junior and senior majors. Prerequisites: One 100-level and one 200-level art history course, or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 18. {H/A} 4 creditsAndré DombrowskiOffered Fall 2007

SeminarsSeminars require both an oral presentation and a re-search paper. Enrollment limited to 12 students.

ARH 315 Studies in Roman Art (S)Topic: At Home in Pompeii. The houses of ancient Pompeii with their juxtapositions of wall-paintings, gardens, and objects of display, will serve as the focus for an analysis of domestic spaces and what they can reveal about family patterns and the theatrics of social interaction in everyday life in another time and place. {H/A} 4 creditsBarbara KellumOffered Spring 2008

ARH 350 The Arts in England, 1485–1714 (S)Constitutional limits on monarchical power, the em-brace of Protestantism, religious intolerance and fa-naticism, revolution and regicide, and a much-vaunted (when not exaggerated and misleading) insularity, set the stage in England for patterns of patronage and a relationship to the visual arts both similar to and significantly different from modes established in Conti-nental absolutist courts. While critically examining the perennial notion of “the Englishness of English art,” we shall study the careers of the painters, printmakers,

sculptors, architects, and landscape designers whose collective efforts made English art, at long last, one to be reckoned with. {H/A} 4 creditsJohn MooreOffered Fall 2007

ARH 352: Studies in Art History (S)Topic: Trading Partners: Visual Culture and Econo-mies of Exchange. Trade and cross-cultural exchange form the central themes of this seminar. Focusing upon early modernity, circa 1500–1800, we consider the rela-tionship among visual culture, long-distance trade and travel. Among the issues we consider: how local desires for foreign commodities—such as Chinese porcelains, African ivories, Dutch tulips, Indonesian spices, Indian textiles and American silver—shaped the visual culture of daily lives; and how travelers, be they merchants or conquistadors, slaves or scientists, pilgrims or refugees, changed local visual cultures. Research projects may focus on any region(s) of the early modern world. Open to majors across the curriculum. Preference given to students with reading knowledge of at least two languages (English and one language relevant to individual research interests). {H/A} 4 creditsDana LeibsohnOffered Fall 2007

ARH 372 Studies in 19th-Century Art (S)Topic: Cézanne and the History of Modernism. No painter has been more influential in the development of modernism than Paul Cézanne (1839–1906). Nearly every major modernist theorist, historian and artist characterizes his influence and achievement as both singular and preeminent. This seminar will look care-fully at his entire career and oeuvre (and at the radical shifts within it), and we will study in particular the ways in which writers and philosophers—from Rainer Maria Rilke to Maurice Merleau-Ponty—have used the artist to write their (pre-)histories of modernism and modernity since the turn of the last century. {H/A} 4 creditsAndré DombrowskiOffered Spring 2008

Cross Listed And Interdepartmental CoursesThe following courses in other departments, are par-ticularly good supplements to the art major and minor.

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AMS 302 The Material Culture of New England 1630–1860Not for seminar credit.

ARC 211 Introduction to Archaeology

GER 227 Topics in German Studies: What Color Is the Earth? What Color Is the Sky?

HST/EAS 218 Thought and Art of Medieval China

LSS 105 Introduction to Landscape Studies

MTH 227 Topics in Modern Mathematics: Mathematical Sculptures

Special StudiesARH 400 Special Studies1 to 4 creditsOffered both semesters each year

ARH 408d Special Studies8 creditsFull-year course; Offered each year

B. Studio CoursesA fee for basic class materials is charged in all studio courses. The individual student is responsible for the purchase of any additional supplies she may require. The department reserves the right to retain examples of work done in studio courses. All studio courses require extensive work beyond the six scheduled class hours. Please note that all studio art courses have limited enrollments.

Introductory CoursesStudio courses at the 100 level are designed to accept all interested students with or without previous art experience. Enrollment is limited to 18 per section, unless otherwise indicated. Two 100-level courses are generally considered the prerequisites for 200 and 300-level courses, unless otherwise indicated in the course description. However, the second 100-level course may be taken during the same semester as an upper-level course, with the permission of the instructor. Priority will be given to entering students and plan B and C majors.

ARS 161 Design Workshop IAn introduction to visual experience through a study of the basic principles of design. {A} 4 creditsCarl CaivanoOffered Spring 2008

ARS 162 Introduction to Digital MediaAn introduction to visual experience through a study of basic principles of design. All course work will be devel-oped and completed using the functions of a computer graphics work station. Enrollment limited to 14. {A} 4 creditsPaola Ferrario, Lynne YamamotoOffered both semesters

ARS 163 Drawing IAn introduction to visual experience through a study of the basic elements of drawing. {A} 4 creditsCarl Caivano, Dwight Pogue, John Gibson, Gary Niswonger, Katherine SchneiderOffered both semesters

ARS 164 Three-Dimensional DesignAn introduction to design principles as applied to three-dimensional form. {A} 4 creditsLynne YamamotoOffered Fall 2007

Intermediate CoursesIntermediate courses are generally open to students who have completed two 100-level courses, unless otherwise stated. Priority will be given to plan B & C majors. Students will be allowed to repeat courses numbered 200 or above provided they work with a different instructor.

ARS 263 Intermediate Digital MediaThis course will build working knowledge of multime-dia digital artwork through experience with multime-dia authoring, Web development, sound and animation software. Prerequisite: ARS 162. {A} 4 creditsJohn SlepianOffered Fall 2007

ARS 264 Drawing IIAdvanced problems in drawing, including study of the human figure. Prerequisite: 163 or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. {A} 4 creditsKatherine SchneiderOffered Fall 2007

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ARS 266 Painting IVarious spatial and pictorial concepts are investigated through the oil medium. Prerequisite: 163 or permis-sion of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. {A} 4 creditsSusan Heideman, Katherine SchneiderOffered both semesters

ARS 267 Watercolor PaintingSpecific characteristics of watercolor as a painting medium are explored, with special attention given to the unique qualities that isolate it from other painting materials. Prerequisites: 163 and 266, or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. {A} 4 creditsSusan HeidemanOffered Fall 2007

ARS 269 Offset Printmaking IIntroduction to the printmaking technique of hand drawn lithography, photographic halftone lithography through Adobe Photoshop and linocut. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisites: 161, or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 12. {A} 4 creditsDwight PogueOffered Fall 2007

ARS 272 IntaglioAn introduction to intaglio techniques, particularly etching and engraving. Prerequisites: 161 or 162 or 163, or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. {A} 4 creditsGary NiswongerOffered Spring 2008

ARS 273 Sculpture IThe human figure and other natural forms. Work in modeling and plaster casting. Prerequisites: 161 and 163, or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 16. {A} 4 creditsA. Lee BurnsOffered Fall 2007

ARS 274 Projects in Installation IThis is a course that introduces students to different installation strategies (e.g., working with multiples, found objects, light and site-specificity). Coursework includes a series of projects, critiques, readings and a paper. Prerequisite: ARS 164, or permission of the in-structor. Enrollment limited to 15. {A} 4 creditsLynne YamamotoOffered Fall 2007

ARS 275 The Book: Theory and Practice IInvestigates (1) the structure and history of the Latin alphabet, augmenting those studies with brief lessons in the practice of calligraphy, (2) a study of typography that includes the composing of type by hand and learn-ing the rudiments of printing type, and (3) an intro-duction to digital typography. Enrollment limited to 12. Admission by permission of the instructor. {A} 4 creditsBarry MoserOffered Fall 2007

ARS 281/LSS 250 Landscape Studies Introductory StudioThis hands-on studio will ask students to consider the landscape a location of evolving cultural and ecologi-cal patterns, processes and histories. Beginning from this set of assumptions, students will work through a series of projects (research, interpretive, documentary, as well as proposal-based), that encourage an engage-ment with the landscape, prodding us to critically consider the environment as a socially and culturally constructed space/place as well as a manageable re-source. We will work in a variety of media including drawing, writing, photography and digital image ma-nipulation. Prerequisites: LSS 100 and 105. Admission by permission of the instructor. Priority given to LSS minors (starting with seniors), and then to students with one or no previous studios. Enrollment limited to 12. {A/S} 4 creditsTo be announcedOffered Fall 2007

ARS 282 Photography IAn introduction to visual experience through a study of the basic elements of photography as an expressive medium. Recommended: 161, 163 or 164. Enrollment limited to 20 per section. {A} 4 creditsPaola Ferrario, Fraser StablesOffered both semesters

ARS 283 Introduction to Architecture: Site and SpaceThe primary goal of this studio is to engage in the architectural design process as a mode of discovery and investigation. Design does not require innate spontane-ous talent. Design is a process of discovery based on personal experience, the joy of exploration and a spir-ited intuition. Gaining skills in graphic communica-tion and model making, students will produce projects to illustrate their ideas and observations in response to challenging questions about the art and craft of space-making. Overall, this course will ask students to take

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risks intellectually and creatively, fostering a keener sensitivity to the built environment as something con-sidered, manipulated and made. Prerequisite: one art history course at the 100 level. Enrollment limited to 12. {A} 4 creditsKirin MakkerOffered Fall 2007

ARS 285 Introduction to Architecture: Language and CraftThe primary goal of this studio is to gain insight into the representation of architectural space and form as a crafted place or object. Students will gain skills in graphic communication and model making, work-ing in graphite, pen, watercolor and other media. We will look at the architecture of the past and present for guidance and imagine the future through conceptual models and drawings. Overall, this course will ask stu-dents to take risks intellectually and creatively, fostering a keener sensitivity to the built environment as some-thing considered, manipulated and made. Prerequisite: one art history course at the 100 level. Enrollment limited to 12. Note: LSS 255 can substitute for ARS 285 in the studio art major. {A} 4 creditsKirin MakkerOffered Spring 2008

Advanced CoursesAdvanced courses are generally open to students who have completed one intermediate course, unless stated otherwise.Priority is given to Plan A, B and C majors.

ARS 361 Interactive Digital MultimediaThis art studio course emphasizes individual and collaborative projects in computer-based interactive multimedia production. Participants will extend their individual experimentation with time-based processes and development of media production skills (3D ani-mation, video and audio production)—developed in the context of interactive multimedia production for performance, installation, CD-ROM or Internet. Critical examination and discussion of contemporary examples of new media art will augment this studio course. Prerequisites: ARS 162 and permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 14. {A} 4 creditsJohn SlepianOffered Spring 2008

ARS 362 Painting IIPainting from models, still-life, and landscape using varied techniques and conceptual frameworks. Prereq-uisites: 266 and permission of the instructor. Enroll-ment limited to 15. {A} 4 creditsJohn GibsonOffered Spring 2008

ARS 369 Offset Printmaking IIAdvanced study in Printmaking. Emphasis on color printing in lithography, block printing and photo-printmaking. Prerequisite: 269 or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 12. {A} 4 creditsDwight PogueOffered Spring 2008

ARS 370 Projects in Installation IIAn advanced course for students already familiar with basis strategies involved in making installations. Students work in a range of media (object oriented, performative, audio/video or combinations). Projects will be driven by a selection of topics (e.g., time and narrative, the body, history and memory, exchange and commerce, audience engagement and the spectacle). The topic(s) will change from year to year. Coursework includes conceptualizing and executing projects, cri-tiques, readings and a paper. Prerequisite: ARS 274. {A} 4 creditsLynn YamamotoOffered Spring 2008

ARS 374 Sculpture IIAdvanced problems in sculpture using bronze casting, welding and various media. Prerequisites: 273 and permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 12. {A} 4 creditsA. Lee BurnsOffered Spring 2008

ARS 375 The Book: Theory and Practice IIAn opportunity for a student already familiar with the basic principles of the book arts and the structure of the book to pursue such as a manuscript or printed book based on the skills learned in The Book: Theory and Practice I, or commensurate studies elsewhere. All stud-ies will be thoroughly augmented with study of original historical materials from the Mortimer Rare Book Room. Prerequisite ARS 275 and/or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 12. {A} 4 creditsBarry MoserOffered Spring 2008

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ARS 383 Photography IIAdvanced exploration of photographic techniques and visual ideas. Examination of the work of contemporary artists and traditional masters within the medium. (Varying topics for 2007–08 to include digital pho-tography and digital printing). Prerequisites: 282 and permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. {A} 4 creditsFraser Stables, Paola FerrarioOffered both semesters

ARS 384 Advanced Studies in Photography Advanced exploration of photography as a means of visual expression. Lectures, assignments and self-generated projects will provide a basis for critiques. Prerequisites: 282 and permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. {A} 4 creditsPaola FerrarioOffered Spring 2008

ARS 385 Seminar in Visual StudiesAn intensive examination of a theme in studio work. Students will work within the medium of their area of concentration. Each class will include students work-ing in different media. Group discussion of readings, short papers, and oral presentations will be expected. The course will culminate in a group exhibition. Enrollment limited to 15 upper-level studio majors. Prerequisites: Two or more courses in the student’s chosen sequence of concentration and permission of the instructor.Fall Topic: Real LifeSpring Topic: Anything Goes {A} 4 creditsFraser Stables, Dwight PogueOffered both semesters

ARS 386 Topics in ArchitectureThis course will explore a rotating selection of themes in the built environment, with strong emphasis on interdisciplinary work. Topics may include preservation and nostalgia, vernacular architecture and landscapes, urban design and planning, architectural theory and practice, material culture methods or other themes. Prerequisites: ARS 163, 283, 285, (or equivalent LSS studio) and two art history courses, or permission of the instructor. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. Enrollment limited to 12. {A} 4 creditsKirin MakkerOffered Fall 2007

ARS 388 Advanced Architecture: Complex Places, Multiple SpacesThis course considers architecture as a socially con-structed place. We will examine the built environment through readings, slide presentations and film. A final project, involving either the manipulation/examina-tion/interpretation of place and space through model-ing and graphic communication or a multimedia research project exploring a socially constructed place will be required. Prerequisites: ARS 163, 283, 285, and two art history courses, or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 12. {A} 4 creditsKirin MakkerOffered Spring 2008

ARS 390 Five College Drawing SeminarThis course, limited to junior and senior art majors from the five colleges, is based on the assumption that drawing is central to the study of art and is an ideal way to investigate and challenge that which is impor-tant to each student. Particular emphasis will be placed on thematic development within student work. Sketch book, written self-analysis and participating in critique sessions will be expected. Prerequisites: selection by faculty; junior and senior art majors, advanced-level ability. Enrollment limited to 15, three students from each of the five colleges. (E) {A} 4 creditsTo be announcedOffered Fall 2007

ARS 398 Senior Exhibition Workshop DevelopmentThis is a two-semester (see also ARS 399) capstone course for senior Plan B majors. It helps students develop the skills necessary for presenting a cohesive exhibition of their work in the second semester of their senior year, as required by the Plan B Major. Its primary focus will be development of the critical judgment necessary for evaluating the art work they have pro-duced to date in their selected studio sequence and for the culling and augmentation of this work as necessary. Course material will include installation or distribution techniques for different media, curation of small exhi-bitions of each others’ work and development of critical discourse skills through reading, writing and speaking assignments. In addition to studio faculty, Smith mu-seum staff may occasionally present topics of concep-tual and/or practical interest. Prerequisites: ARS 163, ARS 161 or ARS 162 or ARS 164, ARS 385; two 100-level art history courses; and at least two courses in selected

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area of concentration. Both courses (ARS 398 and ARS 399) required to graduate. Students should plan on one early evening meeting per week, to be arranged. Graded satisfactory/unsatisfactory only. {A} 1 creditMembers of the departmentOffered Fall 2007

ARS 399 Senior Exhibition WorkshopThe second course of the two-semester sequence re-quired to complete the Plan B Major. See description of ARS 398. Prerequisite: ARS 398. Both courses (ARS 398 and ARS 399) required to graduate. Students should plan on one early evening meeting per week, to be arranged. Graded satisfactory/unsatisfactory only. {A} 1 creditMembers of the departmentOffered Spring 2008

ARS 400 Special StudiesNormally for junior and senior majors.1 to 4 creditsOffered both semesters each year

ARS 408d Special Studies8 creditsFull-year course; Offered each year

Cross-listed and Interdepartmental CoursesThe following courses in other departments, are par-ticularly good supplements to the art major and minor.

FLS 280 Introduction to Video Production

HonorsCo-directors of the Honors Committee: Art History: Dana Leibsohn; Studio Art: Lynne Yamamoto

ARH 430d Thesis8 creditsFull-year course; Offered each year

ARS 430d Thesis8 creditsFull-year course; Offered each year

Requirements: ARH 294 is recommended for art history majors. Honors candidates undertake a yearlong proj-ect or thesis (430d) for 8 credits.

Presentation: The candidate will present her work in an oral critique or defense during April or May.

The MajorAdvisers: Brigitte Buettner, Lee Burns, John Davis, André Dombrowski, Craig Felton, John Gibson, Susan Heideman, Barbara Kellum, Dana Leibsohn, John Moore, Gary Niswonger, Dwight Pogue, Marylin Rhie, Fraser Stables, Frazer Ward, Lynne Yamamoto

Art History Adviser for Study Abroad: John Moore

Art Studio Adviser for Study Abroad: A. Lee Burns

There is one art major, which may be taken in one of three variations: Plan A (history of art), Plan B (studio art) or Plan C (architecture).

Areas of StudyCourses in the history of art are divided into areas that reflect various general time periods. These divisions are:

Group I: 200, 202, 204, 205, 206, 208, 210, 212, 214, 216, 285

Group II: 220, 222, 224, 226, 228, 230, 232, 234

Group III: 240, 242, 244, 246, 250, 252, 254, 255, 258, 292

Group IV: 260, 261, 263, 264, 265, 270, 272, 273, 274, 276, 278, 280, 281, 282, 283, 293

No course counting toward the major or minor may be taken for an S/U grade, except ARS 398 and ARS 399. Students entering Smith College in the Fall 2004 semester (or after) are subject to the following require-ments. All others have the option of following this set of requirements, or the one in effect when they arrived at the college or declared their major.

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Plan A, The History of ArtRequirements: Eleven courses, which will include: 1. Two 100-level courses selected from two of the following categories: a: colloquia (ARH 101) b: non-Western survey (ARH 120 or 130) c: Western survey (ARH 140)2. One course in studio art3. Seven additional history of art courses. Students

must take at least one course in each of four areas of study (Groups I–IV). Normally, five of the history of art courses counted toward the major must be taken at Smith. No more than three of these seven may be in a single distribution group.

4. One seminar in history of art (to be taken at Smith). Seminars do not count toward the distribu-tion requirement.

Plan B, Studio ArtRequirements: Fourteen courses, which will include:1. ARS 1632. One of the following introductory design courses: ARS 161 or ARS 162 or ARS 1643. Two 100-level art history courses selected from two

of the following categories: a: colloquia (ARH 101) b: non-Western survey (ARH 120 or 130) c: Western survey (ARH 140)4. Two additional art history courses, at least one of

which should be in Group I, II or III.5. Five additional studio art courses, which must nor-

mally include the full sequence of courses available (usually three) in one of the following five areas of concentration:

a: electronic media. Smith or Five-College digital or video production may count as upper-level digital courses.

b. graphic arts c. painting d. photography e. sculpture6. ARS 3857. ARS 398 and ARS 399

In addition, in their senior year studio art majors will be required to install an exhibition during the last half of the spring semester, or the fall semester for J-term graduates.

To fulfill this requirement, Plan B majors will enroll in ARS 398–399.

Declaring the Plan B majorA student may declare a Plan B major anytime after she has completed the introductory (100 level) studio art requirements and one additional studio art course. She must submit a portfolio of work to the Portfolio Review Committee. Portfolios will be reviewed each semester, just before the advising period. Students who receive a negative evaluation will be encouraged to take an additional studio course or courses, and resubmit their portfolio at a subsequent review time. Students who receive a negative evaluation may resubmit their portfolios in subsequent reviews up to and including the last portfolio review available during their sopho-more year. These students will be offered suggestions for strengthening their portfolios through additional studio coursework in the same or other media represented in the portfolio. The additional studio courses will count toward fulfilling the major requirements.

Mapping the Plan B majorUpon receiving a positive portfolio evaluation, a student should select and meet with a Plan B adviser. Together they will discuss the student’s interests and review her studio work to date and select an area of studio in which she will concentrate. In exceptional cases the student and her adviser may design a se-quence of studio courses that draws from several areas of concentration.

Plan C, ArchitectureRequirements: Twelve courses, which will include:1. Two 100-level courses selected from two of the following categories: a: colloquia (ARH 101) b: non-Western survey (ARH 120 or 130) c: Western survey (ARH 140)2. ARS 163, 283, 285 and 388 (or their equivalent)3. One other upper-level course in three-dimensional

architectural design, such as ARS 386.4. One studio course in another medium.5. Three 200-level courses in history of art that focus

on architectural monuments, urban environments or spatial experience. Students must take one course in at least two areas of study (Groups I–IV). For 2007–08, the 200-level courses that focus on architecture are for the Fall semester: ARH 250,

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264, 283, 285. For the Spring semester: ARH 205, 222, 265.

6. One seminar in the history of art normally taken at Smith, with the research paper written on an archi-tectural topic.

Students who contemplate attending a graduate pro-gram in architecture should take one year of physics and at least one semester of calculus.

The Minors

Plan 1, History of ArtDesigned for students who, although a major in an-other department, wish to focus some of their attention on the history of art. With the assistance of their advis-ers, students may construct a minor as specific or com-prehensive as they desire within the skeletal structure of the requirements.

Advisers: Brigitte Buettner, John Davis, André Dom-browski, Craig Felton, Barbara Kellum, Dana Leibsohn, John Moore, Marylin Rhie and Frazer Ward

Requirements: Six courses, which will include two 100-level courses, three additional courses in history of art (two of which must be in different areas of study [Groups I–IV]); and one seminar (to be taken at Smith).

Plan 2, Studio ArtDesigned for students who wish to focus some of their attention on studio art although they are majors in another department. With the assistance of her adviser, a student may construct a minor with primary em-phasis on one area of studio art, or she may design a more general minor which encompasses several areas of studio art.

Advisers: A. Lee Burns, John Gibson, Susan Heideman, Gary Niswonger, Dwight Pogue, Fraser Stables and Lynne Yamamoto

Requirements: 163 and five additional courses in studio art, of which at least three must be at the 200 level and at least one must be at the 300 level.

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Plan 3, ArchitectureDesigned for students who wish to focus some attention on architecture although they are majors in another department. Seeks to introduce students to the history, design and representation of the built environment.

Advisers: Brigitte Buettner, John Davis, Barbara Kel-lum, Dana Leibsohn, John Moore, Frazer Ward

Requirements: 1. One 100-level art history course2. ARS 163, 283 and 2853. Two art history courses above the 100-level that

focus on architectural monuments, urban environ-ments or spatial experience: ARH 202, 204, 206, 208, 212, 214, 216, 222, 224, 226, 228, 232, 234, 246, 250, 264, 265, 270, 272, 274, 276, 283, 285, 288, 359. For 2007–08, the 200-level courses that focus on architecture are for the Fall semester: ARH 250, 264, 283, 285. For the Spring semester: ARH 205, 222, 265.

Plan 4, Graphic ArtsAdvisers: Dwight Pogue, Gary Niswonger

Graphic Arts: seeks to draw together the department’s studio and history offerings in graphic arts into a cohe-sive unit. The requirements are: (1) ARS 163 (basis); (2) ARH 292 or 293; and (3) any four ARS from: 269, 270, 272, 275, 369, 372, 375 of which one should be at the 300 level or a continuation of one medium.

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Astronomy

Professor**1, *2 Suzan Edwards, Ph.D, Chair

Associate ProfessorJames Lowenthal, Ph.D.

Laboratory InstructorMeg Thacher, M.S.

Five College FacultyTom R. Dennis, Ph.D. (Professor, Mount Holyoke College)M. Darby Dyar, Ph.D. (Professor, Mount Holyoke College)

George S. Greenstein, Ph.D. (Professor, Amherst College)Salman Hameed, Ph.D. (Assistant Professor, Hampshire College)Stephen E. Schneider, Ph.D. (Professor, University of Massachusetts)Ronald L. Snell, Ph.D. (Professor, University of Massachusetts)Houjun Mo, Ph.D. (Associate Professor, University of Massachusetts)Grant Wilson, Ph.D. (Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts)

Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term.

Students who are considering a major in astronomy should complete PHY 115 and 116 and the mathemat-ics sequence up to Calculus II (MTH 112) at their first opportunity. Good choices for first-year astronomy courses for science majors are AST 111 and AST 113. Courses de-signed for non-science majors who would like to know something about the universe are AST 100, AST 102, AST 103, AST 215, AST 220. The astronomy department is a collaborative Five College department. Courses designated FC (Five Col-lege) are taught jointly with Amherst College, Hamp-shire College, Mount Holyoke College, and the Univer-sity of Massachusetts. Because of differences among the academic calendars of each school, courses des-ignated “FC” may begin earlier or later than other Smith courses. Students enrolled in any of these courses are advised to consult the Five College Astronomy office (545-2194) for the time of the first class meeting.

100 A Survey of the UniverseDiscover how the forces of nature shape our under-standing of the cosmos. Explore the origin, structure and evolution of the earth, moons and planets, comets and asteroids, the sun and other stars, star clusters, the Milky Way and other galaxies, clusters of galaxies

and the universe as a whole. Designed for non-science majors. {N} 4 creditsSuzan EdwardsOffered Fall 2007

102 Sky I: TimeExplore the concept of time, with emphasis on the astronomical roots of clocks and calendars. Observe and measure the cyclical motions of the sun, the moon and the stars and understand phases of the moon, lunar and solar eclipses, seasons. Designed for non-sci-ence majors. Enrollment limited to 25 per section. {N} 3 creditsSuzan Edwards, Meg ThacherOffered Fall 2007

103 Sky II: TelescopesView the sky with the telescopes of the McConnell Rooftop Observatory, including the moon, the sun, the planets, nebulae and galaxies. Learn to use a telescope on your own, and find out about celestial coordinates and time-keeping systems. Designed for non-science majors. Enrollment limited to 20 students per section. {N} 2 creditsJames Lowenthal, Meg ThacherOffered Fall 2007

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AST 109/PHY 109 The Big Bang and BeyondAccording to modern science the universe as we know it began expanding about 14 billion years ago from an unimaginably hot, dense fireball. Why was the universe in that particular state? How did the universe get from that state to the way it is today, full of galaxies, stars, and planets? What evidence supports this “big bang model”? Throughout this course we will focus not simply on what we know about these questions, but also on how we know it and on the limitations of our knowledge. Designed for non-science majors. Enroll-ment limited to 25. (E) {N} 4 creditsGary FelderNot offered in 2007–08

111 Introduction to AstronomyA comprehensive introduction to the study of modern astronomy, covering planets—their origins, orbits, interiors, surfaces and atmospheres; stars—their for-mation, structure and evolution; and the universe—its origin, large-scale structure and ultimate destiny. This introductory course is designed for students who are comfortable with mathematics. Prerequisite: MTH 102 or the equivalent. {N} 4 creditsJames LowenthalOffered Fall 2007

113 Telescopes and TechniquesA beginning class in observational astronomy for stu-dents who have taken or are currently taking a physical science class or the equivalent. Become proficient using the telescopes of the McConnell Rooftop observatory to observe celestial objects, including the moon, the sun, the planets, stars, nebulae and galaxies. Learn celestial coordinate and time-keeping systems. Find out how telescopes and digital cameras work. Take digital im-ages of celestial objects and learn basic techniques of digital image processing. Become familiar with mea-suring and classification techniques in observational astronomy. Enrollment limited to 20 students. {N} 3 creditsJames Lowenthal, Meg ThacherOffered Spring 2008

220 FC20 Topics in AstronomyTopic: Bringing Astronomy Down to Earth—The Art of Communicating Science through Electronic Media. Integrating creative science writing with visu-alization through various forms of electronic media (podcasts/vodcasts, animated gifs, interactive java applets, etc.) to communicate astronomy to general

Astronomy

public. Prerequisite: one science course in any field. {H/N} 4 creditsSalman Hameed, at HampshireOffered Spring 2008

223 FC23 Planetary ScienceAn introductory course for physical science majors. Topics include planetary orbits, rotation and preces-sion; gravitational and tidal interactions; interiors and atmospheres of the Jovian and terrestrial planets; sur-faces of the terrestrial planets and satellites; asteroids, comets and planetary rings; origin and evolution of the planets. Prerequisites: one semester of calculus and one semester of a physical science. {N} 4 creditsDaarby Dyar at Mount HolyokeOffered Fall 2007

224 FC24 Stellar AstronomyDiscover the fundamental properties of stars from the analysis of digital images and application of basic laws of physics. Extensive use of computers and scientific programming and data analysis. Offered in alternate years with 225. Prerequisites: PHY 115, MTH 111, plus one astronomy class. {N} 4 creditsSuzan EdwardsNot offered in 2007–08

225 FC25 Galactic and Extragalactic AstronomyThe discovery of dark matter and the role of gravity in determining the mass of the universe will be explored in an interactive format making extensive use of com-puter simulations and independent projects. Offered in alternate years with 224. Prerequisites: PHY 115, MTH 111, plus one astronomy class. {N} 4 creditsSuzan EdwardsNot offered in 2007–08

226 FC26 CosmologyCosmological models and the relationship between models and observable parameters. Topics in current astronomy that bear upon cosmological problems, including background electromagnetic radiation, nucleosynthesis, dating methods, determinations of the mean density of the universe and the Hubble constant, and tests of gravitational theories. Discussion of the foundations of cosmology and its future as a science. Prerequisites: MTH 111 and one physical science course. {N} 4 creditsGeorge Greenstein at AmherstOffered Fall 2007

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330 FC30a Seminar: Topics in AstrophysicsTopic: Mars. An interactive seminar, reading literature and addressing unresolved questions about the Red Planet, such as water on Mars, the Martian atmosphere, surface composition and geomorphic features, life on Mars. Prerequisite: any intermediate-level astronomy or geology course; AST 223 recommended. {N} 4 creditsDarby Dyar at Mount HolyokeNot offered in 2007–2008

335 FC35 Introduction to AstrophysicsHow astronomers determine the nature and extent of the universe. Following the theme of the “Cosmic Distance Ladder,” we explore how our understanding of astrophysics allows us to evaluate the size of the observ-able universe. Topics include direct distance determina-tions in the solar system and nearby stars, spectroscopic distances of stars; star counts and the structure of our galaxy; Cepheid variables and the distances of galaxies; the Hubble Law and large-scale structure in the uni-verse, and quasars and the Lyman-alpha forest. Prereq-uisites: at least one physics course and one astronomy course at the 200-level or above. {N} 4 creditsGrant Wilson at UMassOffered Fall 2007

337 FC37 Observational Techniques in Optical and Infrared AstronomyAn introduction to the techniques of gathering and analyzing astronomical data, with an emphasis on observations related to determining the size scale of the universe. Telescope design and optics. Instrumentation for imaging, photometry and spectroscopy. Astronomi-cal detectors. Computer graphics and image process-ing. Error analysis and curve fitting. Prerequisites: one astronomy and one physics course at the 200-level. {N} 4 creditsJames LowenthalOffered Spring 2008

352 FC52 Astrophysics of GalaxiesThe application of physics to the understanding of astrophysical phenomena. Physical processes in the gaseous interstellar medium: photoionization in HII regions and planetary nebulae; shocks in supernova remnants and stellar jets; energy balance in molecular clouds. Dynamics of stellar systems: star clusters and the virial theorem; galaxy rotation and the presence of dark matter in the universe; spiral density waves. Qua-sars and active galactic nuclei; synchroton radiation;

accretion disks; supermassive black holes. Prerequisites: four semesters of physics beyond PHY 118. {N} 4 creditsHoujun MoOffered Spring 2008

400 Special StudiesIndependent research in astronomy. Admission by per-mission of the department. The student is expected to define her own project and to work independently, un-der the supervision of a faculty member. 1 to 4 creditsOffered both semesters each year

The MajorAdvisers: Suzan Edwards, James Lowenthal

The astronomy major is designed to provide a good foundation in modern science with a focus on astron-omy. Taken alone, it is suited for students who wish to apply scientific training in a broad general context. If coupled with a major in physics, the astronomy major or minor provides the foundation to pursue a career as a professional astronomer. Advanced courses in math-ematics and a facility in computer programming are strongly encouraged.

Requirements: 44 credits, including 111 or the equiva-lent; 113; three astronomy courses at the 200 level, including 224 or 225; one astronomy course at the 300 level; PHY 115 and 116. In advance consultation with her adviser, a student may select the remaining credits from 200 or 300 level courses in astronomy or from an appropriate selection of intermediate level courses in closely related fields such as mathematics, physics, engineering, geology, computer science, or the history or philosophy of science.

The MinorAdvisers: Suzan Edwards, James Lowenthal

The minor is designed to provide a practical introduc-tion to modern astronomy. If combined with a major in another science or mathematics-related field, such as geology, chemistry or computer science, it can provide a versatile scientific background, which would prepare a student for future work as a scientist or technical specialist. Alternatively, the minor may be combined

Astronomy

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107Astronomy

with a major in a nonscientific field, such as history, philosophy or education, for students who wish to apply their astronomical backgrounds in a broader context, that could include history of science, scientific writing or editing or science education.

Requirements: 24 credits, including 111; 224 or 225; and PHY 115. The remaining courses may be selected from at least one more astronomy course plus any astronomy or physics offerings.

Minor in AstrophysicsAdvisers: Suzan Edwards, James Lowenthal

The astrophysics minor is designed for a student who is considering a career as a professional astronomer. Central to this approach is a strong physics back-ground, coupled with an exposure to topics in modern astrophysics. Students are advised to acquire a facility in computer programming. Especially well-prepared students may enroll in graduate courses in the Five College Astronomy Department.

Requirements: Completion of physics major plus any three astronomy classes except AST 100, 102, 103.

Honors Director: Suzan Edwards

430d Thesis8 creditsFull-year course; Available to qualified students ready for rigorous independent work.

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Biochemistry

**1 Christine White-Ziegler, Ph.D. (Biological Sciences), Director

ProfessorsStylianos P. Scordilis, Ph.D. (Biological Sciences)*1 Steven Williams, Ph.D. (Biological Sciences)

Associate ProfessorsDavid Bickar, Ph.D. (Chemistry)**2 Cristina Suarez, Ph.D. (Chemistry)†1 Adam Hall (Biological Sciences)

Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term.

Assistant Professor*2 Elizabeth Jamieson (Chemistry)Carolyn Wetzel, Ph.D. (Biological Sciences)

Senior Lecturer*2 Lâle Aka Burk, Ph.D.

Laborataory InstructorAmy Burnside

Exemption from required introductory courses may be obtained on the basis of Advanced Placement ordepartmental examinations.

Students are advised to complete all introductory courses (BIO 150 and 151, CHM 111 or 118, 222, 223) as well as BIO 202, 203 and CHM 224 before the junior year.

252 Biochemistry I: Biochemical Structure and FunctionStructure and function of biological macromolecules: proteins and nucleic acids. Mechanisms of conforma-tional change and cooperative activity; bioenergetics, enzymes, and regulation. Prerequisites: BIO 202 and CHM 223. Laboratory (253) must be taken concur-rently by biochemistry majors; optional for others. {N} 3 creditsStylianos ScordilisOffered Spring 2008

253 Biochemistry I LaboratoryTechniques of modern biochemistry: ultraviolet spec-trophotometry and spectrofluorimetry, SDS polyacryl-amide gel electrophoresis, Scatchard analysis, and a project lab on linked enzyme kinetics. Prerequisite: BIO 203. BCH 252 is a prerequisite or must be taken con-currently. {N} 2 creditsAmy BurnsideOffered Spring 2008

352 Biochemistry II: Biochemical DynamicsChemical dynamics in living systems. Enzyme mecha-nisms, metabolism and its regulation, energy produc-tion and utilization. Prerequisites: BCH 252 and CHM 224. Laboratory (BCH 353) must be taken concurrently by biochemistry majors; optional for others. {N} 3 creditsElizabeth Jamieson, Fall 2007Members of the department, Fall 2008Offered Fall 2007, Fall 2008

353 Biochemistry II LaboratoryInvestigations of biochemical systems using experi-mental techniques in current biochemical research. Emphasis is on independent experimental design and execution. BCH 352 is a prerequisite or must be taken concurrently. {N} 2 creditsAmy BurnsideOffered Fall 2007, Fall 2008

380 Seminar: Topics in Biochemistry

Cancer: Cells Out of ControlKnown since the ancient Egyptians, cancers may be considered a set of normal cellular processes gone awry in various cell types. This seminar will consider chemi-cal and radiation carcinogenesis, oncogenesis, growth factor signaling pathways and the role of hormones in cancers, as well as the pathologies of the diseases.

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109Biochemistry

Prerequisites: BIO 202 and BIO 203. {N} 3 creditsStylianos ScordilisOffered Spring 2008

Molecular Pathogenesis of Emerging Infectious DiseasesThis course will examine the impact of infectious dis-eases on our society. New pathogens have recently been identified, while existing pathogens have warranted increased investigation for multiple reasons, including as causative agents of chronic disease and cancer and as agents of bioterrorism. Specific emphasis on the molecular basis of virulence in a variety of organisms will be addressed along with the diseases they cause and the public health measures taken to address these pathogens. Prerequisites: BIO 202 or BIO 204. Recom-mended: BIO 306. {N} 3 creditsChristine White-ZieglerOffered Spring 2009

Biochemical Bases of Neurological DisordersFollowing the decade of the brain there has been a surge in understanding of the biochemical and mo-lecular bases of neurological disorders. This seminar will explore how protein misfolding relates to a number of neuronal diseases including spongiform encepha-lopathies (e.g., “mad cow”), Lou Gehrig’s, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. Prerequisite: Cell Biology, BIO 202. {N} 3 creditsAdam HallOffered Fall 2009

400 Special StudiesVariable credit (1 to 5) as assignedOffered both semesters each year

400d Special StudiesVariable credit (2 to 10) as assignedFull-year course; Offered each year

Other required courses:

BIO 150 Cells, Physiology and DevlopmentStudents in this course will investigate the structure, function and physiology of cells, the properties of biological molecules, information transfer from the level of DNA to cell-cell communication, and cellular energy generation and transfer. The development of multicellular organisms and the physiology of selected organ systems will also be explored. Laboratory (BIO

151) is recommended but not required. Enrollment limited to 80. {N} 4 creditsMichael Barresi, Richard Briggs, Carolyn WetzelOffered Fall 2007, Spring 2008

BIO 151 Cells, Physiology and Development LaboratoryLaboratory sessions in this course will combine ob-servational and experimental protocols. Students will examine cellular molecules, monitor enzymatic reac-tions, photosynthesis and respiration to study cellular function. Students will also examine embryology and the process of differentiation, the structure and func-tion of plant systems, and the physiology of certain animal systems. Prerequisite: BIO 150 (normally taken concurrently). {N} 1 creditMembers of the departmentOffered Fall 2007, Spring 2008

BIO 202 Cell BiologyThe structure and function of eukaryotic cells. This course will examine contemporary topics in cellular biology: cellular structures, organelle function, mem-brane and endomembrane systems, cellular regula-tion, signaling mechanisms, motility, bioelectricity, communication and cellular energetics. This course is a prerequisite for Biochemistry I (BCH 252). Prerequi-sites: BIO 150/151 and CHM 222. Laboratory (BIO 203) is recommended but not required. {N} 4 creditsStylianos ScordilisOffered Fall 2007

BIO 203 Cell Biology LaboratoryInquiry-based laboratory using techniques such as spectrophotometry, enzyme kinetics, bright field and fluorescence light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. There will be an emphasis on student-designed projects. This course is a prerequisite for Biochemistry I Laboratory (BCH 253). Prerequisite: BIO 202, (should be taken concurrently). {N} 1 creditGraham KentOffered Fall 2007

BIO 230 Genes and GenomesAn exploration of genes and genomes that stresses the connections between molecular biology, genetics, cell biology and evolution. Topics will include DNA and RNA structure, recombinant DNA and gene cloning, gene organization, gene expression, RNA processing, mobile genetic elements, gene expression and develop-ment, the molecular biology of infectious diseases,

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110 Biochemistry

the comparative analysis of whole genomes and the origin and evolution of genome structure and content. Prerequisites: BIO 110 or 152. Laboratory (BIO 231) is recommended but not required. {N} 4 creditsRobert DoritOffered Spring 2008

BIO 231 Genes and Genomes LaboratoryA laboratory designed to complement the lecture ma-terial in 230. Laboratory and computer projects will investigate methods in molecular biology including recombinant DNA, gene cloning and DNA sequencing as well as contemporary bioinformatics, data mining and the display and analysis of complex genome data-bases. Prerequisite: BIO 230 (should be taken concur-rently). {N} 1 creditTo be announcedOffered Spring 2008

CHM 111 Chemistry I: General ChemistryThe first semester of our core chemistry curriculum introduces the language(s) of chemistry and explores atoms, molecules and their reactions. Topics covered include electronic structures of atoms, structure shape and properties of molecules; reactions and stoichiom-etry. Enrollment limited to 60 per lecture section, 16 per lab section. {N} 5 creditsKate Queeney, Lâle Aka Burk, Shizuka HsiehOffered Fall 2007, Fall 2008

CHM 118 Advanced General ChemistryThis course is designed for students with a very strong background in chemistry. The elementary theories of stoichiometry, atomic structure, bonding, structure, energetics and reactions will be quickly reviewed. The major portions of the course will involve a detailed analysis of atomic theory and bonding from an orbital concept, an examination of the concepts behind ther-modynamic arguments in chemical systems, and an investigation of chemical reactions and kinetics. The laboratory deals with synthesis, physical properties and kinetics. The course is designed to prepare students for CHM 222/223 as well as replace both CHM 111 and CHM 224. A student who passes 118 cannot take either 111 or 224. Enrollment limited to 32. {N} 5 creditsRobert Linck, Heather Shafer, Fall 2007Offered Fall 2007, Fall 2008

CHM 222 Chemistry II: Organic ChemistryAn introduction to the theory and practice of organic

chemistry. The course focuses on structure, nomen-clature, physical and chemical properties of organic compounds and alkenes, and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for structural analy-sis. Reactions of carbonyl compounds will be studied in depth. Prerequisite: 111 or 118. Enrollment limited to 16 per lab section. {N} 5 creditsRobert Linck, Maureen fa*gan, Maria Bickar, Spring 2008Members of the department, Spring 2009Offered Spring 2008, Spring 2009

CHM 223 Chemistry III: Organic ChemistryThe chemistry of alcohols, ethers, amines, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and functional derivatives of carboxylic acids, aromatic compounds and multi-functional compounds. Introduction to retrosynthetic analysis and multistep synthetic planning. Specific top-ics include reactions of alkyl halides, alcohols, ethers; aromaticity and reactions of benzene; and cycloaddi-tion reactions including the Diels-Alder reaction. Pre-requisite: 222 and successful completion of the 222 lab. Enrollment limited to 16 per lab section. {N} 5 creditsMaureen fa*gan, Rebecca Thomas, Fall 2007Members of the department, Fall 2008Offered Fall 2007, Fall 2008

CHM 224 Chemistry IV: Bonding, Structure, and EnergeticsAn introduction to electronic structure, chemical kinet-ics and mechanisms, and thermodynamics. Introduc-tory quantum mechanics opens the way to molecular orbital theory and coordination chemistry of transition metals. Topics in chemical thermodynamics include equilibria for acids and bases, analyses of entropy and free energy, and electrochemistry. Prerequisite: 111 and 223; MTH 111 or equivalent; or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 16 per lab section. {N} 5 creditsCristina Suarez, Spring 2008Robert Linck, Spring 2009Offered Spring 2008, Spring 2009

One physiology lecture and lab course from:

BIO 200 Animal PhysiologyAnimal and human functions required for survival (movement, respiration, circulation, etc.); neural and hormonal regulation of these functions; and the adjustments made to challenges presented by specific

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111Biochemistry

environments. Prerequisites: BIO 150/151 and CHM 111 or CHM 118. Laboratory (BIO 201) is optional but strongly recommended. {N} 4 creditsMargaret AndersonOffered Fall 2007

BIO 201 Animal Physiology LaboratoryExperiments will demonstrate concepts presented in BIO 200 and illustrate techniques and data analysis used in the study of physiology. BIO 200 must be taken concurrently. {N} 1 creditMargaret AndersonOffered Fall 2007

BIO 204 MicrobiologyThis course examines bacterial morphology, growth, biochemistry, genetics and methods of controlling bacterial activities. Emphasis is on bacterial physiology and the role of the prokaryotes in their natural habi-tats. The course also covers viral life cycles and diseases caused by viruses. Prerequisites: BIO 150 or 111 and CHM 111 or equivalent advanced placement courses. Laboratory (BIO 205) must be taken concurrently. {N} 3 creditsEsteban MonserrateOffered Spring 2008

BIO 205 Microbiology LaboratoryExperiments in this course explore the morphology, physiology, biochemistry and genetics of bacteria using a variety of bacterial genera. Methods of aseptic tech-nique; isolation, identification and growth of bacteria are learned. An individual project is completed at the end of the term. BIO 204 must be taken concurrently. {N} 2 creditsEsteban MonserrateOffered Spring 2008

BIO 312 Plant PhysiologyPlants as members of our ecosystem; water economy; photosynthesis and metabolism; growth and develop-ment as influenced by external and internal factors, survey of some pertinent basic and applied research. Prerequisites: BIO 150, and CHM 111 or CHM 118. Laboratory (BIO 313) is recommended but not re-quired. {N} 4 creditsCarolyn WetzelOffered Spring 2009

BIO 313 Plant Physiology LaboratoryProcesses that are studied include plant molecular biol-ogy, photosynthesis, growth, uptake of nutrients, water balance and transport, and the effects of hormones. Prerequisite: BIO 312 (should be taken concurrently). {N} 1 creditCarolyn WetzelOffered Spring 2009

One physical chemistry course from:

CHM 332 Physical Chemistry IIThermodynamics and kinetics: will the contents of this flask react, and if so, how fast? Properties that govern the chemical and physical behavior of macroscopic collections of atoms and molecules (gases, liquids, solids and mixtures of the above). Prerequisite: MTH 112 or MTH 114. {N} 5 creditsShizuka Hsieh, Cristina Suarez, Spring 2008Members of the department, Spring 2009Offered Spring 2008, Spring 2009

CHM 335 Physical Chemistry of Biochemical SystemsA course emphasizing physical chemistry of biological systems. Topics covered include chemical thermo-dynamics, solution equilibria, enzyme kinetics and biochemical transport processes. The laboratory focuses on experimental applications of physical-chemical principles to systems of biochemical importance. Pre-requisites: 224 or permission of the instructor, and MTH 112. {N} 4 creditsCristina SuarezOffered Fall 2007, Fall 2008

One elective from:

BIO 306 ImmunologyAn introduction to the immune system covering the molecular, cellular, and genetic bases of immunity to infectious agents. Special topics include immunodefi-ciencies, transplantation, allergies, immunopathology and immunotherapies. Prerequisite: BIO 202. Recom-mended: BIO 152 or 230 and/or BIO 204. Laboratory (BIO 307) is recommended but not required.{N} 4 creditsChristine White-ZieglerOffered Fall 2007, Fall 2008

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BIO 310 Cellular and Molecular NeuroscienceMolecular level structure-function relationships in the nervous system. Topics include: development of neu-rons, neuron-specific gene expression, mechanisms of neuronal plasticity in learning and memory, synaptic release, molecular biology of neurological disorders, and molecular neuropharmacology. Prerequisites: BIO 202, BIO 230, or BIO 206, or permission of the instruc-tor. Laboratory (BIO 311) must be taken concurrently. Enrollment limited to 20. {N} 4 creditsAdam C. HallOffered Spring 2009

BIO 332 Molecular Biology of EukaryotesAdvanced molecular biology of eukaryotes and their viruses. Topics will include genomics, bioinformat-ics, eukaryotic gene organization, regulation of gene expression, RNA processing, retroviruses, transposable elements, gene rearrangement, methods for studying human genes and genetic diseases, molecular biol-ogy of infectious diseases, genome projects and whole genome analysis. Reading assignments will be from a textbook and the primary literature. Each student will present an in-class presentation and write a paper on a topic selected in consultation with the instructor. Enrollment limited to 16. Prerequisite: BIO 230. Labo-ratory (BIO 333) is recommended but not required. {N} 4 creditsSteven A. WilliamsOffered Spring 2008

CHM 328 Bio-Organic ChemistryThis course deals with the function, biosynthesis, struc-ture elucidation and total synthesis of the smaller mol-ecules of nature. Emphasis will be on the constituents of plant essential oils, steroids including cholesterol and the sex hormones, alkaloids and nature’s defense chemicals, molecular messengers and chemical com-munication. The objectives of the course can be sum-marized as follows: To appreciate the richness, diversity and significance of the smaller molecules of nature, to investigate methodologies used to study and synthesize these substances, and to become acquainted with the current literature in the field. Prerequisite: 223. Offered in alternate years. {N} 3 creditsLâle BurkOffered Spring 2008

CHM 338 Bio-NMR Spectroscopy and ImagingThis course is designed to provide an understanding of mathematical formulations, electronic elements and experimentally determined parameters related to the study of molecular systems. We will focus on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance as the spectroscopic technique of choice in chemistry and biology. Prerequisites: A knowl-edge of NMR spectroscopy at the basic level covered in CHM222 and 223. Offered in alternate years. {N} 4 creditsCristina SuarezOffered Fall 2007

CHM 347 Instrumental Methods of AnalysisA laboratory-oriented course involving spectroscopic, chromatographic, and electrochemical methods for the quantitation, identification, and separation of species. Critical evaluation of data and error analysis. Prerequi-site: 224 or permission of the instructor. {N/M} 5 creditsJulian Tyson, Fall 2007To be announced, Fall 2008Offered Fall 2007, Fall 2008

CHM 357 Selected Topics in BiochemistryTopic: Pharmacology and Drug Design. An introduc-tion to the principles and methodology of pharmacol-ogy, toxicology and drug design. The pharmacology of several drugs will be examined in detail, and compu-tational software used to examine drug binding and to assist in designing a new or modified drug. Some of the ethical and legal factors relating to drug design, manufacture and use will also be considered. Prerequi-site: BCH 352, or permission of the instructor. Offered in alternate years. {N} 3 creditsDavid BickarOffered Fall 2007, Fall 2009

CHM 369 Bioinorganic ChemistryThis course will provide an introduction to the field of bioinorganic chemistry. Students will learn about the role of metals in biology as well as about the use of inorganic compounds as probes and drugs in biologi-cal systems. Prerequisites: CHM 223 and 224. Offered in alternate years. {N} 4 creditsElizabeth JamiesonOffered Spring 2009

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The MajorRequirements: BCH 252 and 253, 352 and 353; BIO 150 and 151, 202 and 203, 230 and 231; CHM 111, 222 and 223, 224, or 118, 222 and 223.

One physiology course from: BIO 200 and 201, 204 and 205 or 312 and 313.

One physical chemistry course from: CHM 332 or 335.

One elective from: BCH 380; BIO 306, 310, 332; CHM 328, 338, 347, 357, 369.

Students planning graduate study in biochemistry are advised to include a year of calculus and a year of phys-ics in their program of study.

The S/U grading option is not allowed for courses counting toward the biochemistry major.

Exemption from required introductory courses may be obtained on the basis of Advanced Placement or depart-mental examinations.

Students are advised to complete all introductory cours-es (BIO 150, 151, CHM 111 or 118, 222, 223) as well as BIO 202, 203 and CHM 224 before the junior year.

Advisers: Lâle Burk, David Bickar, Adam Hall, Elizabeth Jamieson, Stylianos Scordilis, Cristina Suarez, Carolyn Wetzel, Christine White-Ziegler, Steven Williams

Honors Director: David Bickar

430d Thesis8 creditsFull-year course; Offered each year

432d Thesis12 creditsFull-year course; Offered each year

Requirements: Same as for the major, with the addition of a research project in the senior year, an examination in biochemistry, and an oral presentation of the honors research.

Biochemistry

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Biological SciencesVisiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term.

ProfessorsStephen G. Tilley, Ph.D., ChairRobert B. Merritt, Ph.D.Margaret E. Anderson, Ph.D.Richard F. Olivo, Ph.D.Stylianos P. Scordilis, Ph.D.*1 Steven A. Williams, Ph.D.Paulette Peckol, Ph.D.Richard T. Briggs, Ph.D.Virginia Hayssen, Ph.D.Michael Marcotrigiano, Ph.D.

Associate ProfessorsRobert Dorit, Ph.D.Laura A. Katz, Ph.D.**1 Christine White-Ziegler, Ph.D.**1 L. David Smith, Ph.D.†1 Adam Hall, Ph.D.

Adjunct Associate ProfessorsThomas S. Litwin, Ph.D.Leslie R. Jaffe, M.D.

Assistant ProfessorsCarolyn Wetzel, Ph.D.**1 Michael Barresi, Ph.D.

Adjunct Assistant ProfessorGail E. Scordilis, Ph.D.

LecturersEsteban Monserrate, Ph.D.Denise Lello, Ph.D.Lori Saunders, Ph.D.Robert Nicholson, M.A.

Lecturer and Professor EmeritusC. John Burk, Ph.D.

Senior Laboratory InstructorGraham R. Kent, M.Sc.

Laboratory InstructorsEsteban Monserrate, Ph.D.Gabrielle Immerman, B.A.Judith Wopereis, M.Sc.

Research AssociatePaul Wetzel, Ph.D.

Courses in the biological sciences are divided into five main sections.

1) Introductory and non-majors courses (See pp. 114–116) 2) Core courses, required of all biology majors (See pp. 116–117)3) 200 and 300 level courses, organized by core area (See pp. 117–125)4) Independent research (See pp. 125–127)5) Graduate courses (See pp. 127–128)

Prospective majors are encouraged to refer to the de-scription of the major in this catalog, and to contact biology faculty to discuss appropriate paths through these courses.

Introductory and non-major courses101 Modern Biology for the Concerned CitizenA course dealing with current issues in biology that are important in understanding today’s modern world. Many of these issues present important choices that must be made by individuals and by governments. Topics will include cloning of plants and animals; human cloning; stem cell research; genetically modi-fied foods; bioterrorism; emerging infectious diseases such as Ebola, SARS and West Nile; gene therapy; DNA diagnostics and forensics; genome projects; human origins; and human diversity. The course will include

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115Biological Sciences

guest lectures, outside readings and in-class discus-sions. {N} 4 creditsSteven WilliamsOffered Spring 2008

103 Economic Botany: Plants and Human Affairs A consideration of the plants which are useful or harm-ful to humans; their origins and history, botanical relationships, chemical constituents which make them economically important, and their roles in prehistoric and modern cultures, civilizations and economies. Classes of plants surveyed include those that provide food, timber, fiber, spices, essential oils, medicines, stimulants and narcotics, oils and waxes and other major products. Topics include the history of plant domestication, ethnobotany, biodiversity issues, genetic engineering and biotechnology. No prerequisites. En-rollment limited to 25. (E) 3 creditsRobert NicholsonOffered Spring 2008

110 Introductory Colloquia: Life Sciences for the 21st CenturyThese colloquia provide entering and non-majors stu-dents with interactive, small group discussion courses focused on particular topics/areas of current relevance in the life sciences. Their writing-intensive and quanti-tative-intensive small class formats are meant to foster discussion and encourage active participation. Students engage with the topic of the colloquium using the many styles of inquiry and tools available to contem-porary biologists. While the emphasis will be on subject matter, we will also be concerned with developing the fundamental skills necessary for success in the sciences, including reading and analysis of primary literature, writing about science, data presentation and analysis, and hypothesis construction and testing. A number of concepts introduced in these colloquia are relevant to the 200-level courses intended for majors in the biological sciences. Individual colloquia are designed to emphasize a variety of skills: the designations listed after the title of the colloquium indicate if the course will emphasize quantitative work (Q), written work (W), laboratory exercises (L) and/or reading of primary literature (R). Certain of these colloquia will also ful-fill the college requirement for a “writing-intensive” course indicated by the WI designation. May be repeated for credit with a different subject. Enrollment limited to 20 unless otherwise indicated. {N} 4 credits

Women and Exercise—What Is Really Going On In Our Muscles (Q, R, L)Muscle is a very plastic tissue and responds to envi-ronmental changes and stresses in ways we don’t even notice. It atrophies from disuse, hypertrophies from weight lifting and is constantly changing in response to daily exercise. In this course we will explore the effects of exercise on ourselves. With the aid of various micros-copies, we will examine different muscle cell types. We will carry out biochemical analyses of metabolites such as glucose and lactate, and enzymes such as creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase, to elucidate changes due to exercise. We will also explore some physiological and molecular alterations that help our bodies com-pensate for new exercise patterns. Enrollment limited to 15. {N}Stylianos ScordilisOffered Fall 2007

Your Genes, Your Chromosomes (Q, R, L)A study of human genetics at the level of molecules, cells, individuals and populations. Topics covered will include Mendelian genetics, sex determination, pedigree analysis, genetic diseases, genetic counseling and screening, inheritance of complex characters and population genetics. Laboratory sections will provide students with the opportunity to study their own genes and chromosomes. Laboratories will meet in alternate weeks. {N}Robert MerrittOffered Fall 2007

Pests, Plagues and Profligates: The Biology of Inva-sions (W, Q, R)The study of biological invasions is a relatively new area of science. Much of the research is still observa-tional rather than experimental. What are the patterns of biological invasions? Do invasions correlate with attributes of the organisms that invade or the commu-nities they invade? Is invasion facilitated by what the invaders bring with them (chemical weapons, novel competitive strategies) or what they leave behind (en-emies, overcrowding)? The course will begin with some history and then look at notorious invasion stories. Each case study will lead us into basic biology and help us think through some of the theoretical arguments that have been proposed to explain invasion dynamics. {N}Denise LelloOffered Fall 2007

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The Biology and Policy of Breast Cancer (W, Q, R)This colloquium examines the genetic and environ-mental causes of cancer, focusing on the molecular biology and epidemiology of this suite of diseases. We will pay particular attention to the health and policy implications of recent discoveries concerning the genet-ic causes of predisposition to breast cancer. We will also examine the social and political context of this illness, and the ways in that context shapes our understanding of this disease. {N} WIRobert DoritOffered Spring 2008

Origins (W, Q, R)This course focuses on (1) the origin of life; (2) the origin of modern humans; and (3) the genetic basis, if any, of human races. The first part of the course will focus on the diverse theories (scientific, Christian, etc.) to explain the origin of life, with discussion of the evidence and philosophy behind each theory. Parts 2 and 3 will cover theories and evidence relating to the origin and diversification of humans. We will end with discussion on race and intelligence. Readings will com-bine primary literature with sections from biology text books. Students will be required to research topics, and to produce several written works. {N} WILaura KatzOffered Fall 2008

Conservation Biology (W, Q, R)Conservation biology integrates ecological, genetic and evolutionary knowledge to address the global crisis of biodiversity loss and environmental degradation. Topics include threats to biodiversity, the value of biodiversity, and how populations, communities, and ecosystems can be managed sustainably. {N}L. David SmithOffered Spring 2009

Bacteria: The Good, The Bad and the Absolutely Nec-essary (W, Q, L)This course will focus on topics of disease, on bacteria involved in biogeochemical cycles and the use of bac-teria in bioremediation and industry. Some of the con-cepts will include prokaryotic cell structure, diversity, metabolism and growth. {N}Esteban MonserrateOffered Spring 2009

120 Horticulture: Landscape Plants and IssuesSurvey of the plant materials used in the landscape including interior, annual, perennial, woody plants and turf. Identification, natural biology, culture and use. Introduction to landscape maintenance and design, regional planning and garden history. Lab and presen-tation, field trips. Laboratory (BIO 121) must be taken concurrently. Enrollment limited to 32. {N} 3 creditsMichael MarcotrigianoOffered Fall 2007

121 Horticulture: Landscape Plants and Issues LaboratoryIdentification, morphology and use of landscape plants including annuals, biennials, perennials, tropicals, woody shrubs and trees, vines and aquatics. Bulb planting, pollinations. Design and planning labs and presentations. BIO 120 must be taken concurrently. Enrollment limited to 16 per section. {N} 1 creditGabrielle ImmermanOffered Fall 2007

122 HorticultureAn overview of the field of horticulture. Students learn about plant structure, growth and function. Methods for growing plants, identification and management of plant pests, plant propagation, plant nutrition, garden soils and plant biotechnology. Class presentation. Labo-ratory (BIO 123) must be taken concurrently. Enroll-ment limited to 32. {N} 3 credits.Michael MarcotrigianoOffered Spring 2008

123 Horticulture LaboratoryPractical lab experiences including an analysis of plant parts, seed sowing, identification of diseases and insect pests, plant propagation by cuttings and air layering, transplanting and soil testing. BIO 122 must be taken concurrently. Enrollment limited to 16 per section. {N} 1 creditGabrielle ImmermanOffered Spring 2008

Core CoursesBIO 150, 152 and 154 are all required for the biological sciences major, and may be taken in any order.

150 Cells, Physiology and DevlopmentStudents in this course will investigate the structure, function and physiology of cells, the properties of bio-

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logical molecules, information transfer from the level of DNA to cell-cell communication, and cellular energy generation and transfer. The development of multicel-lular organisms and the physiology of selected organ systems will also be explored. Laboratory (BIO 151) is recommended but not required. Enrollment limited to 80. {N} 4 creditsRichard BriggsOffered Fall 2007, Spring 2008

151 Cells, Physiology and Development LaboratoryLaboratory sessions in this course will combine ob-servational and experimental protocols. Students will examine cellular molecules, monitor enzymatic reac-tions, photosynthesis and respiration to study cellular function. Students will also examine embryology and the process of differentiation, the structure and func-tion of plant systems, and the physiology of certain animal systems. Prerequisite: BIO 150, (normally taken concurrently). {N} 1 creditMembers of the departmentOffered Fall 2007, Spring 2008

152 Genetics, Genomics and EvolutionStudents in this course will achieve a basic knowledge of genetics, genomics and evolution. Principles to be covered include RNA world, Central Dogma, prokary-otic genetics and genomics, molecular techniques, eukaryotic cell cycle, eukaryotic genomics, transmis-sion genetics, population genetics. These principles will be illustrated using four central themes: 1) HIV and AIDS; 2) The making of a fly; 3) A matter of taste; 4) Origin of Species. In addition to lectures, each student will participate in discussion sections that will focus on reading primary literature and mastering genetics problems. Laboratory (BIO 153) is recommended but not required. Enrollment limited to 60. {N} 4 creditsRobert Dorit, Laura Katz,, Robert Merritt, Steven WilliamsOffered Fall 2007, Spring 2008

153 Genetics, Genomics and Evolution LaboratoryLaboratory sessions in this course will combine experi-ments in genetics and genomics with exposure to basic techniques in molecular biology. Laboratories will include computer simulations, PCR, cloning, karyotyp-ing. Prerequisite: BIO 152 (normally taken concur-rently). {N} 1 creditMembers of the departmentOffered Fall 2007, Spring 2008

154 Biodiversity, Ecology and Conservation Students in this course will investigate the origin, nature and importance of the diversity of life on Earth; key ecological processes and interactions that create and maintain communities and ecosystems; principle threats to the biodiversity; and emerging conservation strategies to protect the elements and processes upon which we depend. Throughout the semester, we will emphasize the relevance of diversity and ecological studies in conservation. Assessment is based on a com-bination of quizzes, exams and a short writing assign-ment. Laboratory (BIO 155) is recommended but not required. Enrollment limited to 40 students. {N}4 creditsStephen Tilley, L. David Smith, Laura KatzOffered Fall 2007, Spring 2008

155 Biodiversity, Ecology and Conservation LaboratoryLaboratory sessions in this course will combine obser-vational and experimental protocols both in the lab and in the field. Students will gain familiarity with the diverse lineages of life, and will design and conduct research to address specific hypotheses about a subset of lineages. There will also be field trips to local sites where students will engage in observations of organ-isms in their natural habitats and in experimental exploration of ecological interactions. Prerequisite: BIO 154 (normally taken concurrently). {N} 1 creditMembers of the departmentOffered Fall 2007, Spring 2008

Upper-level offerings in the Biological Sciences are clas-sified into three categories, corresponding to the areas treated by the core courses listed above.

Courses on Cells, Physiology and Development200 Animal PhysiologyFunctions of animals, including humans, required for survival (movement, respiration, circulation, etc.); neural and hormonal regulation of these functions; and the adjustments made to challenges presented by specific environments. Prerequisites: BIO 150/151 and CHM 111 or CHM 118. Laboratory (BIO 201) is optional but strongly recommended. {N} 4 creditsMargaret AndersonOffered Fall 2007

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201 Animal Physiology LaboratoryExperiments will demonstrate concepts presented in BIO 200 and illustrate techniques and data analysis used in the study of physiology. BIO 200 must be taken concurrently. {N} 1 creditMargaret AndersonOffered Fall 2007

202 Cell BiologyThe structure and function of eukaryotic cells. This course will examine contemporary topics in cellular biology: cellular structures, organelle function, mem-brane and endomembrane systems, cellular regula-tion, signaling mechanisms, motility, bioelectricity, communication and cellular energetics. This course is a prerequisite for Biochemistry I (BCH 252). Prerequi-sites: BIO 150/151 and CHM 222. Laboratory (BIO 203) is recommended but not required. {N} 4 creditsStylianos ScordilisOffered Fall 2007

203 Cell Biology LaboratoryInquiry-based laboratory using techniques such as spectrophotometry, enzyme kinetics, bright field and fluorescence light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. There will be an emphasis on student-designed projects. This course is a prerequisite for Biochemistry I Laboratory (BCH 253). Prerequisite: BIO 202 (should be taken concurrently). {N} 1 creditGraham KentOffered Fall 2007

204 MicrobiologyThis course examines bacterial morphology, growth, biochemistry, genetics and methods of controlling bacterial activities. Emphasis is on bacterial physiology and the role of the prokaryotes in their natural habi-tats. The course also covers viral life cycles and diseases caused by viruses. Prerequisites: BIO 150 and CHM 111 or equivalent advanced placement courses. Laboratory (BIO 205) must be taken concurrently. {N} 3 creditsEsteban MonserrateOffered Spring 2008

205 Microbiology LaboratoryExperiments in this course explore the morphology, physiology, biochemistry, and genetics of bacteria using a variety of bacterial genera. Methods of aseptic tech-nique; isolation, identification, and growth of bacteria are learned. An individual project is completed at the

end of the term. BIO 204 must be taken concurrently. {N} 2 creditsEsteban MonserrateOffered Spring 2008

206 Cell PhysiologySurvey of fundamental cell processes with a medical and disease pathology perspective. Topics will include, but are not limited to, cellular diversity, structure and function of cellular compartments and components, and regulation of cellular processes such as energy generation, information transfer (transcription and translation), protein trafficking, cell signaling and cell movement. Particular emphasis will be placed on how misregulation of these cellular processes leads to disease. Prerequisite: BIO 110 or 150 and CHM 111 or CHM 118. This course does not serve as a prerequisite for BCH 252. Laboratory (BIO 207) is recommended but not required. {N} 4 creditsMichael BarresiOffered Spring 2009

207 Cell Physiology LaboratoryInstructed and self-designed experimentation of single cells and multicellular tissues focused on investigating how cells are structured and function. During the first half of the semester students will be introduced to a variety of microscopy techniques such as bright field, darkfield, phase contrast, epifluorescence, confocal and scanning electron microscopy and time-lapse video microscopy. For the remaining semester, students will focus on visualizing the molecular components of single cells using direct immunofluorescence, and test how those components regulate cell function using the cell culture model system. Students will learn the valu-able methodology of cell culture and sterile techniques. Prerequisites: BIO 151 and BIO 236 (normally taken concurrently). {N} 1 creditMichael Barresi, Graham KentOffered Spring 2009

300 NeurophysiologyThe function of nervous systems. Topics include elec-trical signals in neurons, synapses, the neural basis of form and color perception, and the generation of behavioral patterns. Prerequisites: BIO 200, 202 or 206. Laboratory (BIO 301) must be taken concurrently. {N} 4 creditsRichard OlivoOffered Spring 2008

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301 Neurophysiology LaboratoryElectrophysiological recording of signals from neurons, including an independent project in the second half of the semester. BIO 300 must be taken concurrently. {N} 1 creditRichard OlivoOffered Spring 2008

302 Developmental BiologyThe field of developmental biology tries to address the age-old question of how a single cell can give rise to the complexity and diversity of cells and forms that make us the way we are. Developmental Biology spans all disciplines from cell biology and genetics to ecology and evolution. Therefore, this course should appeal to a wide range of student interests and serve as a chance to unify many of the principles discussed in other courses. Observations of the remarkable phenomena that occur during embryonic development will be presented in concert with the experiments underlying our current knowledge. In addition to textbook reading assignments, students will learn to read and present primary literature, design visual representations of developmental processes and compose an abbreviated grant proposal. In order to fully engage students with the research being presented in class, prominent devel-opmental biologists will Web conference with our class. Prerequisites: All three core course are suggested, at least two required. An upper-level course in cell biology (BIO 230/202 or BIO 236/206), genetics (BIO230 or BIO234) is required. Laboratory (BIO 303) is recom-mended but not required. {N} 4 creditsMichael BarresiOffered Fall 2007

303 Developmental Biology LaboratoryStudents will design and carry out their own experi-ments focused on neural and muscle development using zebrafish as a model system. Techniques covered will be embryology, indirect immunocytochemistry, in situ hybridization, microinjection of RNA for gain or loss of function studies, pharmacological analysis, GFP-transgenics, an array of microscopy techniques. This laboratory is designed as a true research experi-ence and thus will require time outside of the normally scheduled lab period. Your data will be constructed into a poster that will be presented at Smith and may be presented at an undergraduate Developmental Biology conference with participating local colleges and uni-versities. Prerequisite: BIO 302 (must be taken concur-

rently). Enrollment limited to 12. {N} 1 creditMichael BarresiOffered Fall 2007

304 HistologyA study of the microscopic structure of animal tissues, including their cellular and extracellular composition, function, and arrangement into organs. Structural or-ganization and structure-function relationships will be emphasized. Prerequisite: BIO 202 or 206. Laboratory (BIO 305) is strongly recommended but not required. {N} 4 creditsRichard BriggsOffered Fall 2007

305 Histology LaboratoryAn introduction to microtechnique: the preparation of tissue and organs for light microscopic examina-tion, including fixation, embedding and sectioning, different staining techniques and cytochemistry and photomicrography. Also includes the study of cell, tis-sue and organ morphology through examination of prepared material. Minimum enrollment: 6 students. Prerequisite: BIO 304 (should be taken concurrently). {N} 1 creditRichard Briggs, Judith WopereisOffered Fall 2007

306 ImmunologyAn introduction to the immune system covering the molecular, cellular and genetic bases of immunity to infectious agents. Special topics include immunodefi-ciencies, transplantation, allergies, immunopathology and immunotherapies. Prerequisite: BIO 202. Recom-mended: BIO 152 or 230 and/or BIO 204. Laboratory (BIO 307) is recommended but not required. {N} 4 creditsChristine White-ZieglerOffered Fall 2007, Fall 2008

307 Immunology LaboratoryImmunological techniques used in diagnosis and as research tools. Experimental exercises include immune cell population analysis, immunofluorescence, Western blotting, ELISA and agglutination reactions. An inde-pendent project is completed at the end of the term. Prerequisite: BIO 306 (must be taken concurrently). Enrollment limited to 16 students. {N} 1 creditChristine White-ZieglerOffered Fall 2007

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308 Introduction to Biological MicroscopyThis course will focus on theory, principles and tech-niques of light (fluorescence, confocal, DIC) microsco-py and scanning and transmission electron microscopy in biology, including basic optics, instrument design and operational parameters. Associated equipment and techniques for specimen preparation and image record-ing will also be considered, along with discussions of elucidating biological structure/function relationships. Admission by permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: BIO 202 or 206. Laboratory (BIO 309) must be taken concurrently. Enrollment limited to 6. {N} 3 creditsRichard BriggsOffered Spring 2008

309 Introduction to Biological Microscopy LaboratoryThe laboratory includes practical techniques for light (fluorescence, confocal, DIC) microscope operation and a more thorough introduction to the scanning and transmission electron microscopes. Selected tech-niques of biological specimen preparation (fixation, embedding, sectioning and staining) for the different microscopies, as well as associated data recording processes, will also be emphasized. In addition to the formal laboratory period, students will need to arrange blocks of time to practice the techniques and work on self-designed investigations. BIO 308 must be taken concurrently. {N} 2 creditsRichard Briggs, Judith WopereisOffered Spring 2008

310 Cellular and Molecular NeuroscienceMolecular level structure-function relationships in the nervous system. Topics include: development of neu-rons, neuron-specific gene expression, mechanisms of neuronal plasticity in learning and memory, synaptic release, molecular biology of neurological disorders and molecular neuropharmacology. Prerequisites: BIO 202, BIO 230 or BIO 206, or permission of the instruc-tor. Laboratory (BIO 311) must be taken concurrently. Enrollment limited to 20. {N} 4 creditsAdam C. HallOffered Spring 2009

311 Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience LaboratoryThis laboratory initially uses tissue culture techniques to study the development of primary neurons in culture (e.g., extension of neurites and growth cones). This is followed by an introduction to DNA microarray tech-nology for studying gene expression in the brain. The

rest of the laboratory uses the Xenopus oocyte expres-sion system to study molecular structure-function. Oocytes (frog eggs) are injected with DNA encoding for a variety of ion channels. The second half of the semes-ter involves a lab project using the expression system to investigate channel characteristics or pharmacology. BIO 310 must be taken concurrently. Enrollment lim-ited to 20 {N} 1 creditAdam C. HallOffered Spring 2009

312 Plant PhysiologyPlants as members of our ecosystem; water economy; photosynthesis and metabolism; growth and develop-ment as influenced by external and internal factors, survey of some pertinent basic and applied research. Prerequisites: BIO 150 and CHM 111 or CHM 118. Lab-oratory (BIO 313) is recommended but not required. {N} 4 creditsCarolyn WetzelOffered Spring 2009

313 Plant Physiology LaboratoryProcesses that are studied include plant molecular biol-ogy, photosynthesis, growth, uptake of nutrients, water balance and transport, and the effects of hormones. Prerequisite: BIO 312 (should be taken concurrently). {N} 1 creditCarolyn WetzelOffered Spring 2009

320 Colloquium on Molecular MedicineA study of cells and their diseased states in humans. The cellular, molecular, metabolic and physiological bases of selected diseases will be analyzed. Topics will include gross and cellular pathology, inflammation, metabolic, musculoskeletal and neurological disorders, as well as the clinical symptomology and therapeutic possibilities. Several topics will be given by pathologists at Baystate Medical Center. Prerequisite: BIO 202. {N} 4 creditsStylianos ScordilisOffered Fall 2008

321 Seminar: Topics in MicrobiologyTopic: Molecular Pathogenesis of Emerging Infec-tious Diseases. This course will examine the impact of infectious diseases on our society. New pathogens have recently been identified, while existing pathogens have warranted increased investigation for multiple reasons,

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including as causative agents of chronic disease and cancer and as agents of bioterrorism. Specific emphasis on the molecular basis of virulence in a variety of or-ganisms will be addressed along with the diseases they cause and the public health measures taken to address these pathogens. Prerequisites BIO 202 or BIO 204. Recommended: BIO 306. {N} 3 creditsChristine White-ZieglerOffered Spring 2009

322 Seminar: Topics in Cell BiologyTopic: Cancer: Cells Out of Control. Known since the ancient Egyptians, cancers may be considered a set of normal cellular processes gone awry in various cell types. This seminar will consider chemical and radia-tion carcinogenesis, oncogenesis, growth factor signal-ing pathways and the role of hormones in cancers, as well as the pathologies of the diseases. Prerequisites: BIO 202 and BIO 203. {N} 3 creditsStylianos ScordilisOffered Spring 2008

Courses on Genetics, Genomics and Evolution

230 Genes and GenomesAn exploration of genes and genomes that stresses the connections between molecular biology, genetics, cell biology and evolution. Topics will include: DNA and RNA structure, recombinant DNA and gene cloning, gene organization, gene expression, RNA processing, mobile genetic elements, gene expression and develop-ment, the molecular biology of infectious diseases, the comparative analysis of whole genomes and the origin and evolution of genome structure and content. Prerequisites: BIO 110 or 152. Laboratory (BIO 231) is recommended but not required. {N} 4 creditsRobert DoritOffered Spring 2008

231 Genes and Genomes LaboratoryA laboratory designed to complement the lecture ma-terial in 230. Laboratory and computer projects will investigate methods in molecular biology including recombinant DNA, gene cloning and DNA sequencing as well as contemporary bioinformatics, data mining and the display and analysis of complex genome data-

bases. Prerequisite: BIO 230 (should be taken concur-rently). {N} 1 creditTo be announcedOffered Spring 2008

232 Evolutionary Biology: The Mechanisms of Evolutionary ChangeThe processes of organic evolution are central to un-derstanding the attributes and diversity of living things. This course deals with the mechanisms underlying change through time in the genetic structures of populations, the nature of adaptation, the formation of species, and methods of inferring evolutionary relation-ships. Prerequisite: BIO 152 and a course in statistics, or permission of the instructor. {N} 4 creditsStephen TilleyOffered Spring 2008

234 Genetic AnalysisThis course explores central concepts in transmission, molecular and population genetics. Topics covered will include nuclear and cytoplasmic inheritance; gene structure, DNA replication and gene expression; re-combination, mutation and repair; manipulation and analysis of nucleic acids; dynamics of genes in popula-tions, mutation, natural selection and inbreeding. Discussion sections will focus on analysis of complex problems in inheritance, molecular biology and the genetic structure of poplations. Prerequisites: BIO 110 or 152. Laboratory (BIO 235) is recommended but not re-quired. {N} 4 creditsRobert MerrittOffered Spring 2008

235 Genetics Analysis LaboratoryA laboratory course designed to complement the lecture material in BIO 234. Investigations include an extended, independent analysis of mutations in Drosphila, and several labs devoted to human genetics. Prerequisite: BIO 234 (should be taken concurrently). {N} 1 creditRobert MerrittOffered Spring 2008

332 Molecular Biology of EukaryotesAdvanced molecular biology of eukaryotes and their viruses. Topics will include genomics, bioinformat-ics, eukaryotic gene organization, regulation of gene expression, RNA processing, retroviruses, transposable

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elements, gene rearrangement, methods for studying human genes and genetic diseases, molecular biol-ogy of infectious diseases, genome projects and whole genome analysis. Reading assignments will be from a textbook and the primary literature. Each student will present an in-class presentation and write a paper on a topic selected in consultation with the instructor. Enrollment limited to 16. Prerequisite: BIO 230. Labo-ratory (BIO 333) is recommended but not required. {N} 4 creditsSteven A. WilliamsOffered Spring 2008

333 Molecular Biology of Eukaryotes LaboratoryA laboratory course designed to complement the lecture material in 332. Advanced techniques used to study the molecular biology of eukaryotes will be learned in the context of a semester-long project. These methods will include techniques for studying genomics and gene expression including: cDNA library construction, DNA sequence analysis, Northern blot analysis, RT-PCR, bioinformatics and others. Enrollment limited to 16. Prerequisite: BIO 332 (should be taken concurrently) and BIO 231. {N} 1 creditTo be announcedOffered Spring 2008

334 Molecular Evolution This course will focus on methods and approaches in the emerging field of molecular evolution. Topics will include the quantitative examination of genetic varia-tion; molecular mechanisms underlying mutation, recombination and gene conversion; the role of chance and selection in shaping proteins and catalytic RNA; comparative analysis of whole genome data sets; com-parative genomics and bioinformatics; applications of molecular evolution in the fields of molecular medi-cine, drug design, and disease and the use of molecular data for systematic, conservation and population biol-ogy. Prerequisite: BIO 152 or BIO 230 or BIO 232, or permission of the instructor. Laboratory (BIO 335) is recommended but not required. {N} 3 creditsRobert DoritOffered Fall 2008

335 Molecular Evolution LaboratoryThis lab will introduce the computational and quanti-tative tools underlying contemporary molecular evolu-tion. We will explore the various approaches to phylo-

genetic reconstruction using molecular data, methods of data mining in genome databases, comparative genomics, and the use of molecular data to reconstruct population and evolutionary history. Students will be encouraged to explore datasets of particular interest to them. Prerequisite: BIO 334 (normally taken concur-rently), or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 14. {N} 2 creditsRobert DoritOffered Fall 2008

350 Topics in Molecular BiologyTopic: Application of New Molecular Technologies to the Study of Infectious Disease. The focus of this seminar will be on the study of newly emerging infec-tious diseases that are of great concern in the public health community. The bird flu (H5N1) is currently causing the greatest apprehension, however, the spread of diseases such as SARS, Ebola, Dengue Fever, West Nile, malaria and many others is also a worrisome trend. What can we learn from the great pandemics of the past (the great influenza of 1918, the Black Death of the Middle Ages, the typhus epidemic of 1914–1921 and others?) How can modern biotechnology be ap-plied to the development of new drugs and vaccines to prevent such pandemics in the future? In addition to natural infections, we now must also be concerned with rare diseases such as anthrax and smallpox that may be introduced to large populations by bioterrorism. The challenges are great but new tools of molecular biology (genomics, proteomics, RNA interference, microarrays and others) provide unprecedented opportunity to un-derstand infectious diseases and to develop new strate-gies for their elimination. {N} 3 creditsSteven A. WilliamsOffered Fall 2008

351 Topics in Evolutionary Biology

Genome EvolutionThe past decade has seen a dramatic increase in data on genome sequences and structures. The seminar explores these emerging data, with the aim of under-standing the evolutionary forces that drive genome evolution. We will examine genome data from mi-crobial organisms, including many disease-causing microbes, as well as from plants, animals and fungi. Technologies for generating and annotating genome data will also be discussed. Finally the course will

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include hands-on training in bioinformatics through computer modules. Prerequisite: BIO 152 or permission of the instructor. {N} 3 creditsLaura KatzOffered Fall 2007

Antibiotics and Antibiotic ResistanceThis seminar will focus on a) The molecular biology of antibiotics; b) the role of antibiotics and antimicrobials in microbial ecosystems; c) the history and future of antibiotic design and use and d) the evolution, mecha-nisms and medical implications of emerging antibiotic resistance. The course will rely on primarily literature in various fields and will take an explicitly multidisci-plinary approach (molecular and evolutionary biology, genetics, ecology, epidemiology and biochemistry) to this critical public health threat. Prerequisite: BIO 152 or permission of the instructor. {N} 3 creditsRobert DoritOffered Spring 2009

Courses on Biodiversity, Ecology and Conservation260 Invertebrate DiversityInvertebrate animals account for the vast majority of species on earth. Although sometimes inconspicu-ous, invertebrates are also vital members of ecologi-cal communities. They provide protein, important ecosystem services, biomedical and biotechnological products, and aesthetic value to humans. Today, many invertebrate populations are threatened by human activities. To protect and manage invertebrate diversity, we must understand its nature and scope. This course is designed to survey the extraordinary diversity of invertebrates, emphasizing their form and function in ecological and evolutionary contexts. Enrollment lim-ited to 20. Prerequisite: BIO 154, or permission of the instructor. Laboratory (BIO 261) must be taken concur-rently and includes one field trip. {N} 3 creditsL. David SmithOffered Fall 2007

261 Invertebrate Diversity LaboratoryExamination of a wide variety of live invertebrates with emphasis on the relationship between form and func-tion. Observations on aspects of invertebrate structure, locomotion, feeding and other behaviors. BIO 260 must

be taken concurrently. One required weekend field trip to the New England coast. {N} 2 creditsL. David SmithOffered Fall 2007

262 Plant BiologyPlants are a significant presence on the planet and contribute to our biological existence as well as our enjoyment of life. This course is an exploration of the diversity and evolution of plants, including compara-tive morphology, reproduction, physiology and develop-ment. Plants will be examined at the cell, organismal and community levels. Prerequisite: BIO 154 or permis-sion of the instructor. Laboratory (BIO 263) is strongly recommended but not required. {N} 4 creditsCarolyn WetzelOffered Fall 2007

263 Plant Biology LaboratoryHands-on examination of plant anatomy, morphology, development and diversity using living and preserved plants. An emphasis on structure/function relation-ships, life cycles, plant interactions with the environ-ment (abiotic and biotic), and use of model plant systems for experimentation. Prerequisite: BIO 262 (should be taken concurrently). {N} 1 creditCarolyn WetzelOffered Fall 2007

264 Plant SystematicsClassical and modern approaches to the taxonomy of higher plants, with emphasis on evolutionary trends and processes and principles of classification. Laborato-ry (BIO 265) must be taken concurrently. {N} 3 creditsJohn BurkOffered Spring 2008

265 Plant Systematics LaboratoryField and laboratory studies of the identification and classification of higher plants, with emphasis on the New England flora. BIO 264 must be taken concur-rently. {N} 1 creditJohn BurkOffered Spring 2008

266 Principles of EcologyTheories and principles pertaining to population growth and regulation, interspecific competition, predation, the nature and organization of communi-ties, and the dynamics of ecosystems. Prerequisites:

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BIO 154 and a course in statistics, or permission of the instructor. Laboratory (BIO 267) recommended but not required. A weekend field trip will be included. {N} 4 creditsStephen TilleyOffered Fall 2007

267 Principles of Ecology LaboratoryIntroduction to ecological communities of southern New England and to the investigation of ecological problems via field work and statistical analysis. Pre-requisite: BIO 266 (normally taken concurrently). {N} 1 creditStephen TilleyOffered Fall 2007

268 Marine EcologyThe oceans cover over 75 percent of the Earth and are home to enormous biodiversity. Marine Ecology explores a variety of coastal and oceanic systems, focusing on natural and human-induced factors that affect biodiversity and the ecological balance in ma-rine habitats. Using case studies, we will study some successful conservation and management strategies, including Marine Protected Areas. This course uses a variety of readings, group activities, and short writing assignments to develop vital skills such as effective oral, graphical and written communication; critical think-ing; and problem solving. Prerequisite: BIO 151 or 154 or GEO 108, or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 24. Laboratory (BIO 269) must be taken concurrently and includes two field trips. {N} 3 creditsPaulette PeckolOffered Fall 2007

269 Marine Ecology LaboratoryThe laboratory applies concepts discussed in lecture and uses several small-group projects in the field and laboratory to develop relevant skills for conducting marine-related research. Students will learn to design and analyze experiments and to write in the scientific style. Field trips to Maine and Cape Cod, MA, provide hands-on experience with marine organisms in their natural habitats. Prerequisite: BIO 268, which must be taken concurrently. {N} 2 creditsPaulette PeckolOffered Fall 2007

270 Microbial EukaryotesThis course focuses on the origin and diversification of eukaryotic cells (cells with nuclei). To provide context, the first weeks of lecture will cover the basics of evolu-tionary analyses, and the origin and diversification of prokaryotic microbes. From there, we will focus on the diversification of microbial eukaryotes, with specific lectures on topics such as microbes and AIDS, and the origins of plants, animals and fungi. Evaluation is based on a combination of tests, discussions and a research paper on a topic chosen by each student. Prerequisite: BIO 152 or 154. Laboratory (BIO 271) is recommended but not required. {N} 4 creditsLaura KatzOffered Spring 2008

271 Microbial Eukaryotes LaboratoryThe laboratory assignments allow students to observe microbial eukaryotes and use microscopy and molecu-lar techniques for experimentation with these organ-isms. Emphasis is on completion of an independent project. A one-day field trip is scheduled. BIO 270 must be taken concurrently. {N} 1 creditJudith WopereisTo be offered Spring 2008

272 Vertebrate BiologyA review of the evolutionary origins, adaptations and trends in the biology of vertebrates. Laboratory (BIO 273) is recommended but not required. {N} 4 creditsVirginia HayssenOffered Spring 2008

273 Vertebrate Biology LaboratoryA largely anatomical exploration of the evolutionary origins, adaptations and trends in the biology of ver-tebrates. Enrollment limited to 20 students. BIO 272 is normally taken with or prior to BIO 273. {N} 1 creditVirginia HayssenOffered Spring 2008

362 Animal BehaviorExamination of the many approaches to the study of animal behavior. Topics include history of the field, physiological bases of behavior, and behavioral ecology and evolution. Prerequisite: one of the following: BIO 260, 272, 363, a statistics course or permission of the instructor. {N} 3 creditsVirginia HayssenOffered Fall 2008

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363 Animal Behavior: MethodsResearch design and methodology for field and labora-tory studies of animal behavior. Prerequisite, one of the following: BIO 262, 272, 362, a statistics course, or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15 students. {N} 3 credits Virginia HayssenOffered Fall 2007

364 Plant EcologyWe often take plants for granted. Their ubiquity under-foot and overhead, on our breakfast table and in phar-maceuticals reflects their fundamental importance to life on earth. This class examines current approaches to studying plant involvement in ecological processes that contribute to the plant assemblage patterns and dynamics that we observe. These include plant-mi-crobe, plant-herbivore and plant pollinator interac-tions, succession, plant invasions, plant responses to climate change and genetic engineering of agricultural plants. Prerequisite: a course in plant biology, ecology or environmental science, or permission of the instruc-tor. Laboratory (BIO 365) must be taken concurrently. {N} 4 creditsDenise LelloOffered Fall 2007

365 Plant Ecology LaboratoryThis course involves field and laboratory investigations of the ecology of higher plants, with emphasis on New England plant communities and review of current literature. The class will visit bogs, salt and freshwater marshes and riparian wetlands, old-growth forests, ag-ricultural sites and research stations at Harvard Forest and on Cape Cod. BIO 364 must be taken concurrently. {N} 1 creditDenise LelloOffered Fall 2007

366 BiogeographyA study of major patterns of distribution of life and of the environmental and historical factors determining these patterns. The role of phenomena such as sea level fluctuations, seafloor spread, oceanic currents, biologi-cal invasions, and climate change in determining past, present and future global patterns of biodiversity will be considered. Fundamental differences between terrestrial and marine biogeography will be highlighted. Prereq-uisite: a course in ecology, evolution or organismal

biology, or permission of the instructor. {N} 4 creditsPaulette PeckolOffered Spring 2008

390 Seminar: Topics in Environmental BiologyTopic: Ecology of Coral Reefs—Past, Present and Future. Coral reefs occupy a relatively small portion of the earth’s surface, but their importance to the marine ecosystem is great. This seminar will examine coral reefs in terms of their geologic importance, both past and present, and their ecological interactions. Empha-sis will be placed on the status of modern coral reefs worldwide, with a focus on effects of environmental and anthropogenic disturbances (e.g., sedimentation, eutrophication, overfishing). Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. {N} 3 creditsPaulette PeckolOffered Spring 2009

Independent Study400 Special StudiesIndependent investigation in the biological sciences. Variable credit (1 to 5) as assignedOffered both semesters each year

The MajorAdvisers: Students should choose their advisers, ac-cording to their interests, from the department faculty, with the exception that the chair of the Board of Pre-Health Advisers does not serve as a major adviser.

Adviser for Study Abroad: Paulette Peckol

The major in biological sciences is designed to provide 1) a strong basis for understanding biological perspec-tives on various issues, 2) conceptual breadth across several major disciplines in biology, 3) depth in one or more specialized fields in biology, 4) experience with modern tools and techniques of biological research and 5) the opportunity to personally experience the excite-ment and process of scientific investigation. Within this general framework, students can construct course programs that serve their individual interests and plans after graduation, while insuring that they acquire a broad background in the biological sciences and expo-

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sure to related fields such as chemistry, physics, geology, engineering, mathematics and computer science.

Prospective majors should consult with biology faculty in choosing their courses. In their first semesters, stu-dents are encouraged to enroll in one of the introduc-tory courses (BIO 100–149) and/or an appropriate core course (BIO 150–156) as well as chemistry (CHM 111 or 118).

The following requirements for the major apply to stu-dents declaring their major in the spring of 2007 and beyond. Students from other class years should consult with their advisers concerning major requirements.

The major requires 56 credits.

The core course requirement:

BIO 150/151: Cells, Physiology and Development/lab

BIO 152/153: Genetics, Genomics and Evolution/lab

BIO 154/155: Biodiversity, Ecology and Conserva-tion/lab

CHM 111/118 and a course in statistics are also re-quired. MTH 245 is strongly recommended for biologi-cal sciences majors.

The distribution requirement: All majors must take at least one upper-level course in each of the following three core areas:

Cells, Physiology and Development:BIO 200–207, 300–322

Genetics, Genomics and Evolution:BIO 230–235, 332–351

Biodiversity, Ecology and Conservation:BIO 260–273, 362–390

The advanced course requirement:At least three 300-level courses are required, one of which must be a laboratory course; courses from other departments/programs may be counted, with approval of the adviser.

The laboratory course requirement:At least six laboratory courses are required, two of which must be core courses laboratories (BIO 151, 153 or 155) and one of which must be at the 300 level. The remaining three laboratories must be chosen from among 200- and 300-level offerings. With the adviser’s approval, a semester of special studies (400) may count as a 200-level laboratory course, and a semester of honors research (430, 431 or 432) may fulfill the 300-level laboratory requirement.

Elective courses: Any departmental course at the 200-level or above may be used for elective credit. Students may also count one introductory level course (BIO 100–149). Up to two courses from other departments or programs may be counted as electives, provided that these relate to a student’s particular interests in biology and are chosen in consultation with her adviser. Such courses might include, but are not limited to BCH 252 and 253; CHM 222 and 223; ESS 215; EVS 300; GEO 231; NSC 200; NSC 311.

Independent research:Independent research is strongly encouraged but not required for the biological sciences major. Up to two semesters of special studies (400) or honors research (430, 431 or 432) may be counted toward completion of the major.

Options for majors with Advanced Placement credit:Majors with scores of 4 or 5 on the Advanced Place-ment examination in biology may receive four credits toward the major in lieu of one core course (BIO 150, 152 or 154). Students should choose the appropriate core course in consultation with their major advisers or other members of the department.

The MinorAdvisers: Members of the department also serve as advisers for the minor.

The requirements for the minor in biological sciences comprise 24 credits chosen in consultation with an adviser. These courses usually include at least one core course and must include one 300-level course. No more than one course designed primarily for non-majors may be included. One course from another department

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or program may be included provided that course is related to a student’s particular interest in biology and is chosen in consultation with her adviser.

HonorsDirector: Virginia Hayssen

Requirements: The same as for the major, and 8 or 12 credits (430d, 431, or 432d) in the senior year of individual investigation culminating in a written thesis and an oral presentation.

430d Thesis8 creditsFull-year course; Offered each year

431 Thesis8 creditsOffered Fall 2007

432d Thesis12 creditsFull-year course; Offered each year

BiochemistrySee pp. 108–113

Environmental Science and PolicySee pp. 208–210

Marine Science and PolicySee pp. 297–298

NeuroscienceSee p. 318–322.

GraduateThe Department of Biological Sciences maintains an active graduate program leading to the Master of Sci-ence Degree in Biological Sciences. The program of study emphasizes independent research supported by advanced course work. Candidates are expected to dem-onstrate a strong background in the life sciences and a clear commitment to independent laboratory, field and/or theoretical research. The department offers op-portunities for original work in a wide variety of fields, including animal behavior, biochemistry, cell and developmental biology, ecology, environmental science, evolutionary biology, genetics, marine biology, micro-biology, molecular biology, neurobiology, plant sciences and physiology. Students pursuing the M.S. degree are required to participate in the Graduate Seminar (BIO 507) and are expected to undertake a course of study, designed in conjunction with their adviser, that will include appropriate courses both within and outside the department.

Adviser: Robert Dorit

507 Seminar on Recent Advances and Current Problems in the Biological SciencesStudents in this seminar discuss articles from the primary literature representing diverse fields of biology and present on their own research projects. Journal articles will be selected to coordinate with departmental colloquia. In alternate weeks, students will present talks on research goals, data collection and data analysis. This course is required for graduate students and must be taken in both years of graduate residence. 2 creditsMembers of the departmentOffered Fall 2007

510 Advanced Studies in Molecular Biology3 to 5 creditsMembers of the departmentOffered both semesters each year

520 Advanced Studies in Botany3 to 5 creditsMembers of the departmentOffered both semesters each year

Biological Sciences

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530 Advanced Studies in Microbiology3 to 5 creditsMembers of the departmentOffered both semesters each year

540 Advanced Studies in Zoology3 to 5 creditsMembers of the departmentOffered both semesters each year

550 Advanced Studies in Environmental Biology3 to 5 creditsMembers of the departmentOffered both semesters each year

590d Research and Thesis8 creditsFull-year course; Offered each year

Prehealth Professional ProgramsStudents may prepare for health profession schools by majoring in any area, as long as they take courses that meet the minimum requirements for entrance. For most schools, these are two semesters each of English, general chemistry, organic chemistry, physics and biol-ogy. The science courses must include laboratories. Biology courses should be selected in consultation with the adviser, taking into consideration the student’s major and specific interests in the health professions. Other courses often recommended include biochemis-try, mathematics including calculus and/or statistics, and social or behavioral science. Because health profes-sion schools differ in the details of their requirements, students should confer with a Prehealth adviser as early as possible about specific requirements.

Preparation for Graduate Study in the Biological SciencesGraduate programs that grant advanced degrees in biology vary in their admission requirements, but often include at least one year of mathematics (preferably including statistics), physics, and organic chemistry. Many programs stress both broad preparation across the biological sciences and a strong background in a specific area. Many institutions require scores on the Graduate Record Examination, which emphasizes a broad foundation in biology as well as quantitative and verbal skills. Students contemplating graduate study beyond Smith should review the requirements of particular programs as early as possible in the course of their studies and seek advice from members of the department.

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ChemistryVisiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term.

ProfessorRobert G. Linck, Ph.D.

Associate ProfessorsDavid Bickar, Ph.D.**2 Cristina Suarez, Ph.D., Chair**1 Kate Queeney, Ph.D.*1 Kevin Shea, Ph.D.

Assistant ProfessorsElizabeth Jamieson, Ph.D.Shizuka Hsieh, Ph.D.Maureen fa*gan, Ph.D.

Senior Lecturer*2 Lâle Aka Burk, Ph.D.

LecturerJulian Tyson

Laboratory InstructorsMaria Bickar, M.S.Rebecca Thomas, Ph.D.Heather Shafer, Ph.D.Smita Jadhav, Ph.D.

Students who are considering a major in chemistry should consult with a member of the department early in their college careers. They are advised to take General Chemistry (CHM 111 or 118) as first-year students and to complete MTH 112 or MTH 114 as early as possible.

All intermediate courses require as a prerequisite CHM 111 or 118 or an Advanced Placement score of 4 or 5.Students who begin the chemistry sequence in their second year can still complete the major and should work with a department member to chart an appropri-ate three-year course.

100 Perspectives in ChemistryTopic: Chemistry of art objects. In this museum-based course, chemistry will be discussed in the context of art. We will focus on materials used by artists and how the chemistry of these materials influences their longevity. Current analytical methods as well as preservation and conservation practices will be discussed with examples from the Smith College Museum of Art. Three hours of lecture, discussion and demonstrations. Class meetings will take place in the museum and in the Clark Science Center. {A/N} 4 creditsLâle Aka Burk, David DempseyOffered Spring 2008, Spring 2009

108 Environmental ChemistryAn introduction to environmental chemistry, apply-ing chemical concepts to topics such as acid rain, the greenhouse effect, the ozone layer, photochemical smog, pesticides and waste treatment. Chemical con-cepts will be developed as needed. {N} 4 creditsShizuka HsiehOffered Spring 2008, Spring 2009

111 Chemistry I: General ChemistryThe first semester of our core chemistry curriculum introduces the language(s) of chemistry and explores atoms, molecules and their reactions. Topics covered include electronic structures of atoms, structure shape and properties of molecules; reactions and stoichiom-etry. Enrollment limited to 60 per lecture section, 16 per lab section. {N} 5 creditsKate Queeney, Lâle Aka Burk, Shizuka HsiehOffered Fall 2007, Fall 2008

118 Advanced General ChemistryThis course is designed for students with a very strong background in chemistry. The elementary theories of stoichiometry, atomic structure, bonding, structure, energetics and reactions will be quickly reviewed. The major portions of the course will involve a detailed analysis of atomic theory and bonding from an orbital

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concept, an examination of the concepts behind ther-modynamic arguments in chemical systems and an investigation of chemical reactions and kinetics. The laboratory deals with synthesis, physical properties and kinetics. The course is designed to prepare students for CHM 222/223 as well as replace both CHM 111 and CHM 224. A student who passes 118 cannot take either 111 or 224. Enrollment limited to 32. {N} 5 creditsRobert Linck, Heather Shafer, Fall 2007Offered Fall 2007, Fall 2008

222 Chemistry II: Organic ChemistryAn introduction to the theory and practice of organic chemistry. The course focuses on structure, nomencla-ture, physical and chemical properties of organic com-pounds and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for structural analysis. Reactions of car-bonyl compounds will be studied in depth. Prerequisite: 111 or 118. Enrollment limited to 16 per lab section. {N} 5 creditsRobert Linck, Maureen fa*gan, Maria Bickar, Spring 2008Members of the department, Spring 2009Offered Spring 2008, Spring 2009

223 Chemistry III: Organic ChemistryMaterial will build on introductory organic chemistry topics covered in 222 and will focus more heavily on retrosynthetic analysis and multistep synthetic plan-ning. Specific topics include reactions of alkyl halides, alcohols, ethers; aromaticity and reactions of benzene; and cycloaddition reactions including the Diels-Alder reaction. Prerequisite: 222 and successful completion of the 222 lab. Enrollment limited to 16 per lab section. {N} 5 creditsMaureen fa*gan, Rebecca Thomas, Fall 2007Members of the department, Fall 2008Offered Fall 2007, Fall 2008

224 Chemistry IV: Bonding, Structure and EnergeticsAn introduction to electronic structure, chemical kinet-ics and mechanisms and thermodynamics. Introduc-tory quantum mechanics opens the way to molecular orbital theory and coordination chemistry of transition metals. Topics in chemical thermodynamics include equilibria for acids and bases, analyses of entropy and free energy and electrochemistry. Prerequisite: 111 and 223; MTH 111 or equivalent; or permission of the

instructor. Enrollment limited to 16 per lab section. {N} 5 creditsCristina Suarez, Spring 2008Robert Linck, Spring 2009Offered Spring 2008, Spring 2009

226 SynthesisSynthetic techniques and experimental design in the context of multistep synthesis. The literature of chem-istry, methods of purification and characterization. Recommended especially for sophom*ores. Prerequisite: 223. {N} 3 creditsKevin Shea, Rebecca Thomas, Spring 2008Members of the department, Spring 2009Offered Spring 2008, Spring 2009

321 Organic SynthesisAn examination of modern methods of organic synthe-sis and approaches to the synthesis of complex organic compounds with a focus on the current literature. Pre-requisite: 223. Offered in alternate years. {N} 4 creditsKevin SheaOffered Spring 2009

324 OrganometallicsStructure and reactivity of transition metal organome-tallic complexes. General organometallic and organic mechanistic principles will be applied to transition-metal catalyzed reactions from the current literature, such as olefin polymerization and metathesis. Prereq-uisite: 224 or permission of the instructor. Offered in alternate years. {N} 4 creditsMaureen fa*ganOffered Fall 2008

328 Bio-Organic ChemistryThis course deals with the function, biosynthesis, struc-ture elucidation and total synthesis of the smaller mol-ecules of nature. Emphasis will be on the constituents of plant essential oils, steroids including cholesterol and the sex hormones, alkaloids and nature’s defense chemicals, molecular messengers and chemical com-munication. The objectives of the course can be sum-marized as follows: To appreciate the richness, diversity and significance of the smaller molecules of nature, to investigate methodologies used to study and synthesize these substances, and to become acquainted with the

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current literature in the field. Prerequisite: 223. Offered in alternate years. {N} 3 creditsLâle BurkOffered Spring 2008

331 Physical Chemistry IQuantum chemistry: the electronic structure of atoms and molecules, with applications in spectroscopy. An introduction to statistical mechanics links the quan-tum world to macroscopic properties. Prerequisites: 224 and MTH 112 or MTH 114. MTH 212 or PHY 210 and PHY 115 or 117 are strongly recommended. {N} 4 creditsRobert Linck, Fall 2007Members of the department, Fall 2008Offered Fall 2007, Fall 2008

332 Physical Chemistry IIThermodynamics and kinetics: will the contents of this flask react, and if so, how fast? Properties that govern the chemical and physical behavior of macroscopic collections of atoms and molecules (gases, liquids, solids and mixtures of the above). Prerequisite: MTH 112 or MTH 114. {N} 5 creditsShizuka Hsieh, Cristina Suarez, Spring 2008Members of the department, Spring 2009Offered Spring 2008, Spring 2009

335 Physical Chemistry of Biochemical SystemsA course emphasizing physical chemistry of biological systems. Topics covered include chemical thermo-dynamics, solution equilibria, enzyme kinetics and biochemical transport processes. The laboratory focuses on experimental applications of physical-chemical principles to systems of biochemical importance. Pre-requisites: 224 or permission of the instructor and MTH 112. {N} 4 creditsCristina SuarezOffered Fall 2007, Fall 2008

337/EGR 337 Materials ChemistryThis course provides an introduction to the interdis-ciplinary field of materials from a chemist’s view-point. Students will learn fundamentals of solid state chemistry as well as techniques used to synthesize and characterize materials (including crystalline and amorphous solids as well as thin films). These concepts will be applied to current topics in materials chemistry, culminating in a final paper and oral presentation on

a topic of each student’s choice. Prerequisite: CHM 224 or equivalent or permission of the instructor. Offered in alternate years. {N} 4 creditsKate QueeneyOffered Spring 2009

338 Bio-NMR Spectroscopy and ImagingThis course is designed to provide an understanding of the general principles governing 1D and 2D Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Examples from the diverse use of biological NMR in the study of protein structures, enzyme mechanisms, DNA, RNA, etc. will be analyzed and discussed. A basic introduction to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) will also be in-cluded, concentrating on its application to biomedical issues. Prerequisite: A knowledge of NMR spectroscopy at the basic level covered in CHM 222 and 223. Offered in alternate years. {N} 4 creditsCristina SuarezOffered Fall 2007

347 Instrumental Methods of AnalysisA laboratory-oriented course involving spectroscopic, chromatographic and electrochemical methods for the quantitation, identification and separation of species. Critical evaluation of data and error analysis. Prerequi-site: 224 or permission of the instructor. {N/M} 5 creditsJulian Tyson, Fall 2007To be announced, Fall 2008Offered Fall 2007, Fall 2008

357 Selected Topics in BiochemistryTopic: Pharmacology and Drug Design. An introduc-tion to the principles and methodology of pharmacol-ogy, toxicology and drug design. The pharmacology of several drugs will be examined in detail, and compu-tational software used to examine drug binding and to assist in designing a new or modified drug. Some of the ethical and legal factors relating to drug design, manu-facture, and use will also be considered. Prerequisite: BCH 352, or permission of the instructor. Offered in alternate years. {N} 3 creditsDavid BickarOffered Fall 2007, Fall 2009

363 Advanced Inorganic ChemistryTopics in inorganic chemistry. Application of group theory to coordination compounds, molecular orbital theory of main group compounds and organometallic

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compounds. Prerequisite: 331. {N} 4 creditsElizabeth JamiesonOffered Spring 2008, Spring 2009

369 Bioinorganic ChemistryThis course will provide an introduction to the field of bioinorganic chemistry. Students will learn about the role of metals in biology as well as about the use of inorganic compounds as probes and drugs in biologi-cal systems. Prerequisites: CHM 223 and 224. Offered in alternate years. {N} 4 creditsElizabeth JamiesonOffered Spring 2009

395 Advanced ChemistryA course in which calculational techniques are illus-trated and used to explore chemical systems without regard to boundaries of subdisciplines. Topics include molecular mechanics, semi-empirical and ab initio computations. Prerequisite: 331. Offered in alternate years. {N} 4 creditsRobert LinckOffered Spring 2008

Cross-listed and Interdepartmental CoursesBCH 352 Biochemistry II: Biochemical DynamicsChemical dynamics in living systems. Enzyme mecha-nisms, metabolism and its regulation, energy produc-tion and utilization. Prerequisites: BCH 252 and CHM 224. Laboratory (BCH 353) must be taken concurrently by biochemistry majors; optional for others. {N} 3 creditsElizabeth Jamieson, Fall 2007Members of the department, Fall 2008Offered Fall 2007, Fall 2008

BCH 353 Biochemistry II LaboratoryInvestigations of biochemical systems using experi-mental techniques in current biochemical research. Emphasis is on independent experimental design and execution. BCH 352 is a prerequisite or must be taken concurrently. {N} 2 creditsAmy BurnsideOffered Fall 2007, Fall 2008

400 Special Studies1 to 4 credits as assignedOffered both semesters each year

The MajorAdvisers: Members of the department

Adviser for Study Abroad: Lâle Burk

Students planning graduate study in chemistry are advised to include PHY 115 or 117 and 118 and MTH 212 or 211 in their programs of study. A major program that includes these courses, one semester of biochemis-try and additional laboratory experience in the form of either (a) two semesters of research (400, 430 or 432), or (b) one semester of research and one elective course with laboratory, or (c) three elective courses with labo-ratory meets the requirements of the American Chemi-cal Society for eligibility for professional standing.

Required courses: 111 and 224 or 118, 222, 223, 226, 331, 332, 347, 363, and a further 6 credits in chemistry, above the 200 level. Four of the six credits may be counted from the research courses 400, 430 or 432, or from BCH 252, BCH 352, GEO 301, PHY 332, PHY 340 or PHY 348. Courses fulfilling the major requirements may not be taken with the S/U option.

The MinorAdvisers: Members of the department

The specified required courses constitute a four-se-mester introduction to chemistry. The semesters are sequential, giving a structured development of chemi-cal concepts and a progressive presentation of chemical information. Completion of the minor with at least one additional course at the intermediate or advanced level affords the opportunity to explore a particular area in greater depth.

Required courses: 21 credits in chemistry that must include 111, 222, 223 and 224. Students who take 118 are required to include 118, 222 and 223. Special Studies 400 normally may not be used to meet the requirements of the minor. Courses fulfilling the minor requirement may not be taken with the S/U option.

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HonorsDirector: Kevin Shea

430d Thesis8 creditsFull-year course; Offered each year

432d Thesis12 creditsFull-year course; Offered each year

An individual investigation pursued throughout the senior year.

Requirements: The same as those for the major, with the addition of a thesis and an oral examination in the area of the thesis.

Lab FeesThere is an additional fee for all chemistry courses with labs. Please see the Fees, Expenses and Financial Aid section in the beginning this catalogue for details.

Chemistry

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Classical Lan guag es and LiteraturesVisiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term.

ProfessorsJustina W. Gregory, Ph.D.†2 Thalia A. Pandiri, Ph.D. (Classical Languages and Literatures and Comparative Literature), Chair

Scott A. Bradbury, Ph.D.*1 Nancy J. Shumate, Ph.D

LecturerMaureen B. Ryan, Ph.D.

Majors are offered in Greek, Latin, classics and classi-cal studies. Qualified students in these majors have the opportunity of a semester’s study at the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome. Students planning to major in classics are advised to take relevant courses in other departments such as art, English, history, philosophy and modern foreign languages. Students who receive scores of 4 and 5 on the Advanced Placement test in Virgil may not apply that credit toward the degree if they complete LAT 213 for credit. Credit is not granted for the first semester only of an introductory language course.

GreekGRK 100y Elementary GreekA year-long course that will include both the funda-mentals of grammar and, in the second semester, selected readings. {F} 8 creditsJustina GregoryFull-year course; offered each year

GRK 212 Attic Prose and DramaPrerequisite: 100y. {L/F} 4 creditsScott BradburyOffered Fall 2007

GRK 213 Homer, Iliad or OdysseyPrerequisite: 212 or permission of the instructor. {L/F} 4 creditsThalia PandiriOffered Spring 2008

GRK 310 Advanced Readings in Greek Literature I & IIAuthors read in GRK 310 vary from year to year, but they are generally chosen from a list including Plato, Homer, Aristophanes, lyric poets, tragedians, historians and orators, depending on the interests and needs of the students. GRK 310 may be repeated for credit, pro-vided that the topic is not the same. Prerequisite: GRK 213 or permission of the instructor. {L/F} 4 credits

Plato’s SymposiumAttention to literary, philosophical and cultural aspects. Thalia PandiriOffered Fall 2007

Lyric PoetryAn introduction to the lyric poetry of the Archaic Age. Topics will include the relationship between the epic and lyric traditions; the role of lyrics, music and dance in private and communal life; the nature of the autho-rial “I.” Selections from a wide range of poets from the Greek-speaking Mediterranean world of the seventh to early fifth century B.C.E., including Archilochus, Sap-pho, Solon, Pindar. Prerequisite: GRK 213. {L/F} Justina GregoryOffered Spring 2008

GRK 404 Special StudiesAdmission by permission of the department, for majors and honors students who have had four advanced courses in Greek. 4 creditsOffered both semesters each year

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GraduateGRK 580 Studies in Greek LiteratureThis will ordinarily be an enriched version of the 300-level course currently offered. 4 creditsOffered both semesters each year

Adviser for Graduate Study: Justina Gregory

LatinLAT 100y Elementary LatinFundamentals of grammar, with selected readings from Latin authors in the second semester. {F} 8 creditsScott Bradbury, Maureen RyanFull-year course; offered each year

LAT 212 Introduction to Latin Prose and PoetryPractice and improvement of reading skills through the study of a selection of texts in prose and verse. System-atic review of fundamentals of grammar. Prerequisite: LAT 100y or the equivalent. {L/F} 4 creditsMaureen RyanOffered Fall 2007

LAT 213 Introduction to Virgil’s AeneidPrerequisite: 212 or permission of the instructor. {L/F} 4 creditsNancy ShumateOffered Spring 2008

LAT 330 Advanced Readings in Latin Literature I & IIAuthors read in LAT 330 vary from year to year, but they are generally chosen from a list including epic and lyric poets, historians, orators, comedians and novelists, depending on the interests and needs of students. LAT 330 may be repeated for credit, provided that the topic is not the same. Prerequisite: Two courses at the 200-level or permission of the instructor. {L/F} 4 credits

Medieval LatinSelected readings from prose and poetry by a wide range of authors, from the third century to the 14th. Emphasis on the individual in society, through the study of first-person narratives, confessions, letters, inquisition records. Prerequisite: a 200-level course in Latin or the equivalent. {L/F} 4 creditsScott BradburyOffered Fall 2007

Virgil’s Eclogues and GeorgicsPrerequisite: a 300-level course in Latin or the equiva-lent. {L/F}Brian BreedOffered Spring 2008

LAT 404 Special StudiesAdmission by permission of the department, for majors and honors students who have had four advanced courses in Latin. 4 creditsOffered both semesters each year

GraduateLAT 580 Studies in Latin LiteratureThis will ordinarily be an enriched version of the 300-level courses currently offered. 4 creditsOffered both semesters each year

Adviser for Graduate Study: Justina Gregory

Classics in TranslationFYS 129 Rites of PassageHow does Western literature represent the passage to adulthood of young women and young men? What are the myths, rituals, images and metaphors associated with this passage, and how do historical representa-tions intersect with modern lived experience? We will read narratives of transition from archaic and classical Greece and 20th-century Europe and North America, including Homer’s Odyssey, the Homeric Hymn to Demeter, the poems of Sappho, and novels by Alain-Fournier, Thomas Mann and Willa Cather. Enrollment limited to 16 first-year students. {L} WI 4 creditsJustina GregoryOffered Fall 2007

CLS 227 Classical MythologyThe principal myths as they appear in Greek and Ro-man literature, seen against the background of ancient culture and religion. Focus on creation myths, the structure and function of the Olympian pantheon, the Troy cycle and artistic paradigms of the hero. Some at-tention to modern retellings and artistic representations of ancient myth. {L/A} 4 creditsScott BradburyOffered Spring 2008

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CLS 233 Gender and Sexuality in Greco-Roman CultureThe construction of gender, sexuality and erotic experi-ence is one of the major sites of difference between Greco-Roman culture and our own. What constituted a proper man and a proper woman in these ancient societies? Which sexual practices and objects of desire were socially sanctioned and which considered deviant? What ancient modes of thinking about these issues have persisted into the modern world? Attention to the status of women; the role of social class; the ways in which genre and convention shaped representation; the relationship between representation and reality. {L/H} 4 creditsNancy ShumateOffered Spring 2008

Cross-listed and Interdepartmental CoursesCLT 202/ENG 202 Western Classics in Translation, from Homer to DanteOffered Fall 2007

CLT 203/ENG 203 Western Classics in Translation, from Chrétien de Troyes to TolstoyOffered Spring 2008

CLT 230 “Unnatural” WomenOffered Spring 2008

The Major in Greek, Latin or ClassicsAdvisers: Members of the department

Adviser for Study Abroad: Thalia Pandiri

Basis: in Greek, 100y; in Latin, 100y; in classics, Greek 100y and Latin 100y.

Requirements: In Greek, eight four-credit courses in the language in addition to the basis; in Latin, eight four-credit courses in the language in addition to the basis; in classics, eight four-credit courses in the languages in addition to the basis and including not fewer than two in each language.

The Major in Classical StudiesAdvisers: Members of the department

Basis: GRK 100y or LAT 100y (or the equivalent). Competence in both Greek and Latin is strongly recom-mended.

Requirements: Nine semester courses in addition to the basis. Four chosen from GRK (200-level or above) or LAT (200-level or above); at least two from classics in translation (CLS); and at least two appropriate courses in archaeology (ARC), art history (ARH), government (GOV), ancient history (HST), philosophy (PHI) and/or religion (REL), chosen in accordance with the interests of the student and in consultation with the adviser. With the approval of the adviser courses in other de-partments and programs may count toward the major.

The Minor in GreekAdvisers: Members of the department

Requirements: Six four-credit courses, of which at least four must be courses in the Greek language and at least three must be at or above the 200 (intermediate) level. The remaining courses may be chosen from Greek history, Greek art, ancient philosophy, ancient political theory, ancient religion or classics in translation. At least one course must be chosen from this category.

The Minor in LatinAdvisers: Members of the department

Requirements: Six four-credit courses, of which at least four must be courses in the Latin language and at least three must be at or above the 200 (intermediate) level. The remaining courses may be chosen from Roman history, Roman art, ancient political theory, ancient religion or classics in translation. At least one course must be chosen from this category.

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137Classical Lan guag es and Literatures

The Minor in ClassicsAdvisers: Members of the department

Requirements: Six four-credit courses in Greek or Latin languages and literatures at or above the level of 212, including not fewer than two in each language. One of these six courses may be replaced by a course related to classical antiquity offered either within or outside the department, and taken with the department’s prior approval.

Honors in Greek, Latin, Classics or Classical StudiesDirector: Justina Gregory

430d Thesis8 creditsFull-year course; Offered each year

Requirements: The same as those for the major, with the addition of a thesis, to be written over the course of two semesters, and an examination in the general area of the thesis.

Greek, Latin or Classics

Graduate590d Research and Thesis8 creditsFull-year course; Offered each year

590 Research and Thesis4 or 8 creditsOffered both semesters each year

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Comparative LiteratureVisiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term.

†2 Ann Rosalind Jones, Ph.D., DirectorJanie Vanpée, Ph.D. (French Studies), Director

ProfessorsMaria Banerjee, Ph.D. (Russian Language and Literature)Elizabeth Harries, Ph.D. (English Language and Literature and Comparative Literature)†1 Ann Rosalind Jones, Ph.D.†2 Thalia Alexandra Pandiri, Ph.D. (Classical Languages and Literatures and Comparative Literature)Craig R. Davis, Ph.D. (English Language and Literature) Anna Botta, Ph.D. (Italian Language and Literature and Comparative Literature)

Associate Professors†1 Reyes Lázaro, Ph.D. (Spanish and Portuguese)Luc Gilleman, Ph.D. (English Language and Literature)Sabina Knight, Ph.D. (East Asian Languages and Literatures)Katwiwa Mule, Ph.D. (Comparative Literature)†2 Dawn Fulton, Ph.D. (French Studies)Ambreen Hai, Ph.D. (English Language and Literature)

Assistant ProfessorsJustin Cammy, Ph.D. (Jewish Studies)Nicolas Russell, Ph.D. (French Studies)Joel Westerdale, Ph.D. (German Studies)

LecturerMargaret Bruzelius, Ph.D.

A study of literature in two or more languages, one of which may be English. In all comparative literature courses, readings and discussion are in English, but students are encouraged to read works in the original language whenever they are able. Comparative Litera-ture courses are open to all first-year students unless otherwise noted. All300-level courses require a previous literature course at the 200-level or above.

Introductory CoursesENG 120 Celtic WorldsCraig R. DavisOffered Fall 2007

ENG 120 Scandinavian MythologyCraig R. DavisOffered Spring 2008

ENG 120 Representing the CaribbeanAmbreen HaiOffered Fall 2007

FYS 129 Rites of PassageJustina GregoryOffered Fall 2007

CLT 150 The Art of Translation: Poetics, Politics, PracticeWe hear and read translations all the time: on televi-sion news, in radio interviews, in movie subtitles, in international bestsellers. But translations don’t shift texts transparently from one language to another. Rather, they revise, censor and rewrite original works, to challenge the past and to speak to new readers. We’ll explore translation by hearing talks by translators and experts in the history and theory of translation. Stu-dents will look at translations from around the world and experiment with translating themselves. Knowl-edge of a foreign language useful but not required. Graded S/U only. (E) {L} 2 creditsKatwiwa Mule and Thalia Pandiri, Co-directorsOffered Spring 2008

CLT 202/ENG 202 Western Classics in Translation, from Homer to DanteRobert Hosmer, Thalia Pandiri, Maria Banerjee, Elizabeth HarriesOffered Fall 2007

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An interdepartmental course, CLT 202/ENG 202 is a requirement for the CLT major. Students interested in comparative literature should take it as early as pos-sible, if they are ready for a fast-paced, challenging course that includes a lot of reading and writing.

CLT 203/ENG 203 Western Classics in Translation, from Chrétien de Troyes to TolstoyElizabeth Harries, Maria BanerjeeOffered Spring 2008

Intermediate CoursesCLT 204 Writings and RewritingsTopic: The Mediterranean. Three continents, Africa, Asia and Europe, share coastlines on the Mediter-ranean—literally, “the sea between lands.” Linked to the origins of Western civilization and to imperialism and orientalism, the Mediterranean has given its name to a stereotypical landscape (sunshine, olive trees, vineyards) and to a social type (Southerners seen as passionate, cunning, and slow). What do Club Meds, the Mafia and Balkanization have in common? Can a Mediterranean identity not defined by the North exist? This region will focus our discussion of issues central to comparative literature today: competing nationalisms, Eurocentrism, orientalism, tradition vs. moderniza-tion, globalization. Literary texts by Homer, Goethe, Lawrence, Amin Maalouf and Orhan Pamuk; history and theory from Hesiod, Plato, Braudel, Natalie Zemon Davis. Open to first-year students by permission of the instructor. {L} 4 creditsAnna BottaOffered Spring 2008

205 Twentieth-Century Literatures of AfricaAn introduction to the major genres and writers of modern Africa. Novels, short stories, drama and epics from every region of Africa, focusing on the way in which they draw upon traditional oral cultures, con-front over a century of European colonialism on the continent, and represent contemporary postcolonial realities. Texts, some written in English and others translated from French and such African languages as Swahili and Songhay, will include Achebe’s Things Fall Apart, Ngugi’s The River Between, Bessie Head’s Maru, Mariama Bâ’s So Long A Letter, Soyinka’s Death and the King’s Horseman, and The Epic of Askia Moham-

med recounted by Nohou Malio. Open to students at all levels. {L}Katwiwa MuleOffered Fall 2007

218 Holocaust LiteratureCreative responses to the destruction of European Jewry, differentiating between literature of the Holocaust (texts written in extremis in ghettos, camps or in hiding) and the vast post-war literature about the Holocaust. In what ways do dynamics of artistic representation respond to the cultural, linguistic, and ideological con-text, intended audience, and the passage of time? Who is authorized to tell the story of the Holocaust? How to balance competing claims of individual and collective experience, the rights of the imagination and the pres-sures for historical accuracy? Selections from a variety of artistic genres (diary, memoir, reportage, poetry, novel, oral testimony, comic book, film, monuments, museums, literary theory), balancing works addressed to European and American audiences by virtue of their composition in non-Jewish languages, and the recovery of Yiddish and Hebrew voices, all in translation. Open to students at all levels. {L/H} 4 creditsJustin CammyOffered Fall 2008

220 ColloquiumTopic: Imagining Language. We will think about the links between words and things as philosophers and artists have imagined them. Reading largely pre-20th-century theories of language by Plato, St. Augustine, Locke, Condillac, Freud and others, we will pair each of these thinkers with 20th-century artists (poets, book makers, prose writers) who meditate in their work on the same questions of language. Short exercises (ana-grams, rebuses, alphabet poems, portmanteau words) will be an integral part of the course. {L} 4 creditsMargaret BruzeliusOffered Spring 2008

POR 221 Topics in Portuguese and Brazilian Literature and CultureTopic: Cultural Crosscurrents in Today’s Portu-guese-Speaking World. This course will examine a range of interlocking cultural, sociopolitical and/or environmental factors that galvanize attention in Portuguese-speaking countries. Themes might include post-colonial debates in Lusophone Africa, street chil-

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dren in urban Brazil, or heritage language communi-ties in Massachusetts. Materials will draw from literary and journalistic texts, as well as art, music and film. Conducted in Portuguese. {L/F/A} 4 credits.Marguerite Itamar HarrisonOffered Spring 2008

CLS 227 Classical MythologyThe principal myths as they appear in Greek and Ro-man literature, seen against the background of ancient culture and religion. Focus on creation myths, the structure and function of the Olympian pantheon, the Troy cycle and artistic paradigms of the hero. Some attention to modern retellings and artistic representa-tions of ancient myth. Enrollment limited to 30. {L/A} 4 creditsScott BradburyOffered Spring 2008

230 “Unnatural” Women: Mothers Who Kill Their ChildrenSome cultures give the murdering mother a central place in myth and literature while others treat the subject as taboo. How is such a woman depicted—as monster, lunatic, victim, savior? What do the motives attributed to her reveal about a society’s assumptions and values? What difference does it make if the author is a woman? Authors to be studied include Euripides, Seneca, Ovid, Anouilh, Papadiamandis, Atwood, Walker, Morrison. Prerequisite: at least one college-level course in literature. {L} 4 creditsThalia PandiriOffered Spring 2008

EAL 232 Modern Chinese LiteratureSelected readings in translation of Chinese literature from the late-Qing dynasty to contemporary Taiwan and the People’s Republic of China. This course will offer (1) a window on 20th-century China (from the Sino-Japanese War of 1895 to the present) and (2) an introduction to the study of literature: (a) why we read literature, (b) different approaches (e.g., how to do a close reading) and (c) literary movements. We will stress the socio-political context and questions of politi-cal engagement, social justice, class, gender, race and human rights. All readings are in English translation and no background in China or Chinese is required. {L} 4 creditsSabina KnightOffered Spring 2008

CLS 233 Gender and Sexuality in Greco-Roman CultureThe construction of gender, sexuality, and erotic experi-ence is one of the major sites of difference between Greco-Roman culture and our own. What constituted a proper man and a proper woman in these ancient societies? Which sexual practices and objects of desire were socially sanctioned and which considered deviant? What ancient modes of thinking about these issues have persisted into the modern world? Attention to the status of women; the role of social class; the ways in which genre and convention shaped representation; the relationship between representation and reality. {L/H} 4 creditsNancy ShumateOffered Spring 2008

234 The Adventure Novel: No Place for a Woman?This course explores the link between landscape, plot and gender: how is the adventure landscape organized? Who lives where within it? What boundaries mark safe and unsafe places? Beginning with essays on cartogra-phy by Denis Wood, we’ll read three classic 19th-centu-ry boys’ books (Scott, Stevenson, Verne), then adventure fictions with female protagonists by E.M. Forster, Ursula Le Guin, Peter Dickinson, Astrid Lundren and others, to explore the ways in which this genre has embraced and resisted female heroes. {L} 4 creditsMargaret BruzeliusOffered Fall 2007

235 Fairy Tales and GenderA study of the literary fairy tale in Europe from the 1690s to the 1990s, with emphasis on the ways women have written, rewritten and transformed them. Some attention to oral story-telling and to related stories in other cultures. Writers will include Aulnoy, Perrault, le Prince de Beaumont, the Grimms, Andersen, Christina Rossetti, Angela Carter, Sexton, Broumas. Prerequisite: at least one college-level course in literature. Not open to first-year students. {L} 4 creditsElizabeth HarriesOffered Fall 2007

240 Childhood in Literatures of Africa and the African DiasporaChildhood, intimately tied to social, political and cul-tural histories, to questions of self and national identity, entails specific crises in Africa and the African diaspora, focused on loss of language, exile and memory. How does the enforced acquisition of a colonizer’s language

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affect children as they attempt to master the codes of an alien tongue and culture? How do narratives told from the point of view of children represent and deal with such alienation, and what are the relationships between recollections of childhood and published autobiography? Texts will include Camara Laye’s The African Child, Tahar Ben-Jalloun’s The Sand Child, Julia Alvarez’s How the Garcia Girls Lost their Accents, Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye. Open to students at all levels. {L} 4 creditsKatwiwa MuleOffered Fall 2007

EAL 260 Health and Illness: Literary ExplorationsHow do languages, social norms and economic con-texts shape experiences of health and illness? How do conceptions of selfhood, sexuality, belonging and spirituality inform ideas about well-being, disease, intervention and healing? This cross-cultural literary inquiry into bodily and emotional experiences will also explore Western biomedical and traditional Chinese diagnosis and treatment practices. From despair and chronic pain to cancer, aging and death, how do suf-ferers and their caregivers adapt in the face of infirmity or trauma? Our study will also consider how stories and other genres can help develop resilience, compassion and hope. Enrollment limited to 19. {L} 4 creditsSabina KnightOffered Spring 2008

266 South African Literature and FilmA study of South African literature and film since 1948 in their social, political and economic contexts and as sites for anti-apartheid struggles. We will study South African writers, autobiographers, and film-makers of various racial and social backgrounds and also exam-ine some testimonies from the Truth and Reconcilia-tion Commission as staged public drama. Texts include Mazisi Kunene’s Mandela’s Ego, Njabulo Ndebele’s The Cry of Winnie Mandela, Zoe Wicomb’s You Can’t Get Lost in Cape Town; anti-apartheid films such as Cry Freedom, Ipi Tombi, South Africa Belongs to Us, Country and City Lovers. (E) {L}Katwiwa MuleOffered Spring 2008

268 Latina and Latin American Women WritersThis course examines the last twenty years of Latina writing in this country while tracing the Latin Ameri-can roots of many of the writers. Constructions of eth-

nic identity, gender, Latinidad, “race,” class, sexuality and political consciousness are analyzed in light of the writers’ coming to feminism. Texts by Esmeralda San-tiago, Gloria Anzaldúa, Sandra Cisneros, Judith Ortiz Cofer, Denise Chávez, Demetria Martínez and many others are included in readings that range from poetry and fiction to essay and theatre. Knowledge of Spanish is not required, but will be useful. First-year students must have the permission of the instructor. {L} 4 creditsNancy SternbachOffered Spring 2008

271 Writing in Translation: Bilingualism in the Postcolonial NovelA study of bilingualism as a legacy of colonialism, as an expression of exile, and as a means of political and artistic transformation in recent texts from Africa and the Americas. We will consider how such writers as Ngugi wa Thiong’o (Kenya), Assia Djebar (Alge-ria), Patrick Chamoiseau (Martinique), and Edwidge Danticat (Haiti/U.S.) assess the personal and political consequences of writing in the language of a former colonial power, and how they attempt to capture the esthetic and cultural tensions of bilingualism in their work. {L} 4 creditsDawn FultonOffered Spring 2008

272 Women Writing: 20th and 21st Century FictionA study of the pleasures and politics of fiction by women from English-speaking and French-speaking cultures. How do women writers engage, subvert and/or resist dominant meanings of gender, sexuality, race and ethnicity and create new narrative spaces? Who speaks for whom? How does the reader participate in making meaning(s)? How do different theoretical perspectives (feminist, lesbian, queer, psychoanalytic, postcolonial, postmodern) change the way we read? Writers such as Woolf, Colette, Condé, Larsen, Morrison, Duras, Rule, Kingston, Shields and Atwood. Not open to first-year students. {L/H} 4 creditsMarilyn SchusterOffered Spring 2008

275 Israeli LiteratureIsrael is portrayed in literature as a holy land, a prom-ised land, a contested land. What role have writers played in imagining, then challenging and refashion-ing Zionist dreams and Israeli realities, and how does literature reflect the country’s historical, ideological,

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and ethnic complexities? Topics include tensions be-tween the universalizing seductions of Exile and the romantic appeal of homeland; utopian fictions; the invention of the New Jew vis-à-vis the exotic (Arab or Eastern) Other; the function of landscape in the con-solidation of a new national literature (the desert, the socialist kibbutz, cosmopolitan Tel Aviv, Jerusalem of heaven and earth); portrayals of the ongoing conflict between Arab and Jew; contemporary postmodern (and post-Zionist) texts reflecting Israeli society and its geo-political condition. Hebrew novels, short stories, mem-oir and poetry (all in translation), from the early 20th century until today, with precursor and counter-texts from European, American and Palestinian authors. Open to students at all levels interested in understand-ing the ways literature interprets Israel’s place in the modern Middle East. {L} 4 creditsJustin CammyOffered Fall 2007

277 At Home with Kafka: Modern Jewish FictionWhat is modern Jewish literature? Explores relation-ships between language and identity, diaspora and exile, political powerlessness and artistic vitality, homeless imaginations and imagined homecomings, folklore and avant-garde culture, the particularity of national experience and the universality of the Jew. Readings by masters of 20th-century European fiction: Sholem Aleichem’s uproarious Yiddish tales of Eastern Europe; Kafka’s haunting modernist parables; Isaac Babel’s passionate narratives of the Russian revolu-tion; S.Y. Agnon’s Hebrew stories of spiritual loss and redemption; and I.B. Singer’s post-Holocaust demons, shlemiels, sinners and refugees. Also includes several literary memoirs. In what way do these figures (and their critics) invent the narrative for what one historian recently called “The Jewish Century”? Open to students at all levels.. Open to students at all levels. {L} 4 creditsJustin CammyOffered Spring 2008

Advanced Courses305 Studies in the Novel

The Philosophical NovelThis course charts the evolution of the theme of reason and its limits in the European novel of the modern era. Beginning with an examination of humanist assump-

tions about the value of reason in Rabelais, the course will focus on the Central European novel of the 20th century, the age of “terminal paradoxes.” Texts will include Dostoevsky’s Notes from the Underground, Kafka’s The Trial, Musil’s Man without Qualities, and Kundera’s The Joke, The Farewell Party, and The Un-bearable Lightness of Being. {L}Maria BanerjeeOffered Fall 2007

SPN 332 The Middle Ages TodayTopic: Queer Iberia. This course examines the me-dieval and early-modern Iberian understanding and expressions of sexuality within the context of modern critical theory. Special attention will be given to the complex and ambiguous representations of same-sex desire, and the manner in which such representations are shaped by the discourses about nation, disease, and race (limpieza de sangre). Texts include Ibn Hazm’s Tawq al-hamama, Juan Ruiz’s Libro de buen amor, selections from Al-Himyyari’s al-Rawad al mi’tar, Fernando de Rojas’s La Celestina, Francesc Eiximenis’s Lo Llibre de led dones, as well as poems by Yehuda Halevi, Wallada, al-Mu’tamid and Abraham Ibn Ezra. All readings in Spanish translation. Taught in Spanish. Enrollment limited to 12. {L/F} 4 creditsIbtissam BouachrineOffered Spring 2008

ENG 352 Seminar: The Middle Passage in Contemporary Black Literature and CulturePoet Robert Hayden described the Middle Passage of the slave trade as a “voyage through death” that trans-ported Africans across the Atlantic to the Americas. This course explores the legacy of the Middle Passage in contemporary literature and culture from 1969 to today looking at how past is made present. Through poetry, novels, short stories, film and visual art on the Middle Passage, we will consider how this historical phenom-enon works as motif in black culture and site of trauma for black artists. We will examine the ways different genres achieve particular nuances in their expressions of this voyage. Prerequisite: a 200-level course in Eng-lish or Afro-American Studies. (E) {L} 4 creditsDanielle ElliottOffered Fall 2007

ENG 345 Tales Within Tales Within TalesWhy do writers enclose stories within other stories? What is the function of narrative frames? Why does

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Scheherezade tell tales within tales in order to ward off death? We will read frame tales from many periods and cultures, from The Arabian Nights to Boccaccio and Chaucer to Shelley’s Frankenstein and Anne Sexton’s Transformations, as well as some critical writing on framing, as we try to answer these questions. Enroll-ment limited to 12. {L} 4 creditsElizabeth HarriesOffered Spring 2008

ENG 395 Freud and Sherlock HolmesReadings include Freud’s case studies and Conan Doyle’s detective stories; popular accounts of Freud and Holmes in fiction, film, and drama; and critical investigations of their economies of signification (for-ays into various critical -isms). Practical component: keeping a dream journal and collaborative writing of a detective story or fictionalized case study. Prerequisite: an advanced literature course and interest in theory. {L} 4 creditsLuc GillemanOffered Fall 2007

Critical Theory and Method300 Foundations of Contemporary Literary TheoryThe interpretation of literary and other cultural texts by psychoanalytic, Marxist, structuralist and post-structur-alist critics. Emphasis on the theory as well as the prac-tice of these methods: their assumptions about writing and reading and about literature as a cultural forma-tion. Readings include Freud, Lacan, Barthes, Derrida and Foucault. Enrollment limited to 25. {L} 4 creditsJanie VanpéeOffered Fall 2007

301/FRN 301 Contemporary Theory in FrenchFor students concurrently enrolled in CLT 300, wishing to read and discuss in French the literary theory at the foundation of contemporary debates. Readings of such seminal contributors as Saussure, Lévi-Strauss, Barthes, Foucault, Derrida, Lacan, Cixous, Kristeva, Irigaray, Fanon, Deleuze, Baudrillard. Optional course. Graded S/U only. (E) {L/F} 1 creditJanie VanpéeOffered Fall 2007

340 Problems in Literary TheoryA final seminar required of senior majors, designed to explore one broad issue (e.g., the body, memory and writing; exile; art about art) defined at the end of the fall semester by the students themselves. Prerequisites: CLT 202 and CLT 300, or permission of the instructor. {L} 4 creditsJanie VanpéeOffered Spring 2008

404 Special StudiesOffered both semesters, with the permission of the in-structor and of the program director. 4 credits

The MajorBefore entering the major, the student must prove her foreign-language proficiency by completing a begin-ning literature course in the foreign language or lan-guages of her choice at the level of CHI 302, GER 222, GRK 212, ITL 250, JPN 301, LAT 212, POR 221, RUS 338, SPN 220 or FRN 230. (FRN 260 may be counted as one of the three advanced courses in literature required for the Comparative Literature Major.) If a student has not taken language courses at Smith College, the de-partment concerned will assess her proficiency.

Requirements: 13 semester courses as follows:1. CLT 202, CLT 204, CLT 300, CLT 340 (Note: CLT

202 is a prerequisite for 340 and should be taken as early as possible;

2. Three comparative literature courses (only courses with a primary or cross-listing in comparative lit-erature count as comparative literature courses);

3. Three intermediate or advanced literature courses in a foreign language approved by the major adviser. If a student takes both semesters of a year-long literary survey in a foreign language (e.g., FRN 253, 254) she may count the two courses as one advanced literature course;

4. Three literature courses in an additional language, which may be English. In certain cases a student may take up to three upper-level courses of litera-ture in translation, in a distinct language or re-gional or national literature, such as the literature of a seldom taught language, including Old Norse or Basque, or in African, Middle Eastern, Arabic,

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144 Comparative Literature

Chinese, Japanese, Jewish (Yiddish, Hebrew or La-dino) or Russian literature. A student who wants to pursue this option must present her adviser with a plan for the courses she intends to take and a ratio-nale for her choice;

5. Among the literature courses taken for the major, in language and literature departments and in the CLT program one course must focus on texts from cultures beyond the European/American mainstream: e.g., East Asian, African or Caribbean writing, or minority writing in any region. One course must focus on literature written before 1800. (CLT 203 fulfills this requirement.) One course must include substantial selections of poetry. Each student will consult with her adviser about how her courses meet these requirements.

HonorsRequirements: The same as those for the major, with the addition of a thesis (430), to be written in both semesters of the senior year.

Director: Maria Banerjee

430d Honors ThesisRequirements: The same as those for the major, with the addition of a thesis to be written in both semesters of the senior year. The first draft is due on the first day of the second semester and will be commented on by both the adviser and a second reader. The final draft is due on April 1, to be followed in early May by an oral presentation and discussion of the thesis. For more detailed requirements, see the CLT Web site, at the end of the list of courses.8 creditsFull-year course; offered each year

Director of Study Abroad: Janie Vanpée

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Computer Science

ProfessorsMichael O. Albertson, Ph.D. (Mathematics and Statistics)†1 Joseph O’Rourke, Ph.D.Ileana Streinu, Ph.D.

Associate ProfessorsDominique F. Thiébaut, Ph.D.

Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term.

*2 Judy Franklin, Ph.D., Chair

Assistant Professors**2 Nicholas Howe, Ph.D.Judith Cardell, Ph.D. (Clare Booth Luce Assistant Professor of Computing Engineering)Eitan Mendelowitz

Three computer science courses have no prerequisites. These are CSC 102 (How the Internet Works), CSC 103 (How Computers Work), and CSC 111 (Computer Science I). Students who contemplate a major in com-puter science should consult with a major adviser early in their college career.

102 How The Internet WorksAn introduction to the structure, design and operation of the Internet, including the electronic and physical structure of networks; packet switching; how e-mail and Web browsers work, domain names, mail proto-cols, encoding and compression, http and HTML, the design of Web pages, the operation of search engines, beginning JavaScript; CSS. Both history and societal implications are explored. Prerequisite: basic familiar-ity with word processing. Enrollment limited to 30. The course will meet for half of the semester only. {M} 2 creditsNicholas Howe, Fall 2007, Spring 2008Offered half of both semesters each year

103 How Computers WorkAn introduction to how computers work. The goal of the course is to provide students with a broad under-standing of computer hardware, software and operat-ing systems. Topics include the history of computers; logic circuits; major hardware components and their design, including processors, memory, disks and video monitors; programming languages and their role in developing applications; and operating system func-tions, including file system support and multitasking,

multiprogramming and timesharing. Weekly labs give hands-on experience. Enrollment limited to 30. {M} 2 creditsJudith CardellOffered first half of the semester, Fall 2007

105 Interactive Web DocumentsA half-semester introduction to the design and creation of interactive environments on the World Wide Web. Focus on three areas: 1) Web site design; 2) JavaScript; 3) Embedded multimedia objects. Enrollment limited to 30. Prerequisites: CSC 102 or equivalent competency with HTML. {M} 2 creditsNicholas Howe and Eitan MendelowitzOffered second half of the semester, Spring 2008

111 Computer Science IIntroduction to a block-structured object oriented high-level programming language. Will cover language syntax and use the language to teach program design, coding, debugging, testing and documentation. Proce-dural and data abstraction are introduced. Enrollment limited to 48; 24 per lab section. {M} 4 creditsDominique Thiébaut, Fall 2007Judy Franklin, Spring 2008Offered both semesters each year

112 Computer Science IIElementary data structures (linked lists, stacks, queues, trees) and algorithms (searching, sorting) are covered, including a study of recursion and the object-oriented programming paradigm. The language of instruc-

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tion is Java. The programming goals of portability, efficiency and data abstraction are emphasized. Pre-requisite: 111 or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 30. {M} 4 creditsIleana Streinu, Fall 2007Nicholas Howe, Spring 2008Offered both semesters each year

220 Advanced Programming TechniquesFocuses on several advanced programming environ-ments, with a project for each. Includes object-oriented programming, graphical user interfaces (GUIs) under Windows and/or Linux, and principles of software engi-neering. Topics include Java’s GUI swing package, and its methods for listening for events and creating threads to dispatch events, tools for C++ code development, and programming in the Python language. Prerequi-site: 112. {M} 4 creditsIleana Streinu and Eitan MendelowitzOffered Spring 2008

231/EGR 250 Microprocessors and Assembly LanguageAn introduction to the architecture of the Intel Pentium class processor and its assembly language in the Linux environment. Students write programs in assembly and explore the architectural features of the Pentium, including its use of the memory, the data formats used to represent information, the implementation of high-level language constructs, integer and floating-point arithmetic, and how the processor deals with I/O devices and interrupts. Prerequisite: 112 or permission of the instructor. {M} 4 creditsDominique ThiébautOffered every Fall

240 Computer GraphicsCovers two-dimensional drawings and transformations, three-dimensional graphics, lighting and colors, game design, perspective, curves and surfaces, ray tracing. Employs Postscript, C++, GameMaker, and POV-ray; radiosity. The course will accommodate both CS ma-jors, for whom it will be programming intensive, and other students with less technical expertise, by having two tracks of assignments. Prerequisites for CSC major credit: 112, MTH 111 or permission of the instructor; otherwise, CSC 111 or permission of the instructor. {M} 4 creditsMembers of the departmentOffered every Fall

249 Computer NetworksThis course introduces fundamental concepts in the de-sign and implementation of computer communication networks, their protocols, and applications. Topics to be covered include layered network architecture; physical layer and data link protocols; and transport protocols, routing protocols and applications. Most case studies will be drawn from the Internet TCP/IP protocol suite. Prerequisites: CSC 111 and MTH 153. {M} 4 creditsJudith CardellOffered Spring 2008

250 Foundations of Computer ScienceAutomata and finite state machines, regular sets and regular languages; push-down automata and context-free languages; linear-bounded automata; computabil-ity and Turing machines; nondeterminism and unde-cidability. Perl is used to illustrate regular language concepts. Prerequisites: 111 and MTH 153. {M} 4 creditsJudy FranklinOffered every Fall

252 AlgorithmsCovers algorithm design techniques (“divide-and-con-quer,” dynamic programming, “greedy” algorithms, etc.), analysis techniques (including big-O notation, recurrence relations), useful data structures (including heaps, search trees, adjacency lists), efficient algo-rithms for a variety of problems, and NP-completeness. Prerequisites: 112, MTH 111, MTH 153. {M} 4 creditsIleana StreinuOffered Spring 2009

262 Introduction to Operating SystemsAn introduction to the functions of an operating system and their underlying implementation. Topics include file systems, CPU and memory management, concur-rent communicating processes, deadlock and access and protection issues. Programming projects will implement and explore algorithms related to several of these topics. Prerequisite: 231. {M} 4 creditsNicholas HoweOffered Spring 2009

270/EGR 251 Digital Circuits and Computer SystemsThis class introduces the operation of logic and sequen-tial circuits. Students explore basic logic gates (and, or, nand, nor), counters, flip-flops, decoders, microproces-sor systems. Students have the opportunity to design

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and implement digital circuits during a weekly lab. Prerequisite: 231. Enrollment limited to 12. {M} 4 creditsDominique ThiébautOffered Spring 2008

274 Computational GeometryExplores the design and analysis of data structures and algorithms for solving geometric problems, with applications to robotics, pattern recognition and com-puter graphics. Topics include polygon partitioning, convex hulls, Voronoi diagrams, arrangements of lines, geometric searching and motion planning. Students will have a choice between writing several programs, or exploring theoretical questions. Prerequisites: MTH 153, and either 112 or MTH 211. {M} 4 creditsIleana StreinuOffered Fall 2007

290 Introduction to Artificial IntelligenceAn introduction to artificial intelligence including an introduction to artificial intelligence programming. Topics covered include game playing and search strate-gies; machine learning; natural language understand-ing; neural networks; genetic algorithms; evolutionary programming; philosophical issues. Prerequisites for CSC major credit: CSC 112, MTH 111 or permission of the instructor; otherwise, CSC 111 or permission of the instructor. {M} 4 creditsJoseph O’RourkeOffered Spring 2009

352 Seminar in Parallel ProgrammingThe primary objective of this course is to examine the state of the art and practice in parallel and distributed computing, and to expose students to the challenges of developing distributed applications. This course deals with the fundamental principles in building distributed applications using C and C++, and parallel exten-sions to these languages. Topics will include process and synchronization, multithreading, Remote Method Invocation (RMI) and distributed objects. Prerequisites: 112 and 252. {M} 4 creditsDominique ThiébautOffered Fall 2008

353 Seminar in RoboticsA seminar introduction to Robotics. Topics include basic mechanics, electronics and sensors, basic kine-matics and dynamics, configuration space, motion

planning, robot navigation, and self-reconfiguring robots. Projects will include computer simulations and programming existing and student-built robots. Prerequisites: CSC 112, 231, Calculus, Discrete Math or permission of the instructor. {M} 4 creditsIleana StreinuOffered Spring 2008

354 Seminar in Digital Sound and Music ProcessingFocuses on areas of sound/music manipulation that overlap significantly with computer science disciplines. Topics are digital manipulation of sound; formal models of machines and languages to analyze and generate sound and music; algorithms and techniques from artificial intelligence for music composition and music database retrieval; and hardware aspects such as time-dependence. This is a hands-on course in which music is actively generated via programming projects and includes a final installation or demonstration. Prerequisites are 111, 112, and 250 or permission of the instructor. 4 creditsJudy FranklinOffered Fall 2008

364/EGR 354 Computer ArchitectureOffers an introduction to the components present inside computers and is intended for students who wish to understand how the different components of a com-puter work and how they interconnect. The goal of the class is to present as completely as possible the nature and characteristics of modern-day computers. Topics covered include the interconnection structures inside a computer, internal and external memories, hardware supporting input and output operations, computer arithmetic and floating point operations, the design of and issues related to the instruction set, architecture of the processor, pipelining, microcoding, and multipro-cessors. Prerequisites: 270, or 231. {M} 4 creditsDominique ThiébautOffered Spring 2009

370 Computer Vision and Image ProcessingExplores the challenge of computer vision through readings of original papers and implementation of classic algorithms. This seminar will consider tech-niques for extracting useful information from digital images, including both the motivation and the math-ematical underpinnings. Topics range from low-level techniques for image enhancement and feature detec-tion to higher-level issues such as stereo vision, image

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retrieval, and segmentation of tracking of objects. Prerequisites: CSC 112, MTH 153 {N} 4 creditsNicholas HoweOffered Fall 2007

Cross-listed and Interdepartmental CoursesMTH 353 Advanced Topics in Discrete Applied MathematicsTopic: Computational Complexity. Good versus bad algorithms, easy versus intractable problems. The complexity classes P, NP and a thorough investigation of NP-Completeness. Connections with Graph Theory, Number Theory, Logic, and Computer Science. Prereq-uisites: MTH 254, MTH 255, or CSC 252 or permission of the instructor. {M} 4 creditsNot offered in 2007–08

400 Special StudiesFor majors, by arrangement with a computer science faculty member.Variable credit as assignedOffered both semesters each year

The MajorAdvisers: Judith Cardell, Judy Franklin, Nicholas Howe, Joseph O’Rourke, Ileana Streinu, Dominique Thiébaut

Requirements: At least 11 semester courses (44 graded credits) including:

1. 111, 112, 231, 250;2. a. One of MTH 111, MTH 112, MTH 114; or MTH

125; b. MTH 153; c. One 200-level or higher math course,3. Three distinct 200- or 300-level courses: designated

according to the table below, as follows: a. At least one designated Theory; b. At least one designated Programming; c. At least one designated Systems;4. At least one CSC 300-level course (not among those

satisfying previous requirements).

Course Theory Programming SystemsCSC 220 (Adv. Prog) X CSC 240 (Graphics) X X CSC 249 (Networks) XCSC 252 (Algorithms)) X CSC 262 (Op Sys) X XCSC 270 (Circuits) XCSC 274 (Comp Geom) X X CSC 290 (AI) X X CSC 294 (Linguistics) X CSC 249 (Networks) XCSC 293 (Compilers) X X ENG 321 (Dig. Sig. Proc.) XCSC 352 (Parallel Prog.) X XCSC 353 (Robotics) X XCSC 364 (Architecture) XCSC 390 (AI seminar) X CSC 354 (Music) X X

CSC 370 (Vision) X X

The MinorStudents may minor in computer science by fulfilling the requirements for one of the following concentra-tions or by designing, with department approval, their own sequence of six courses, which must include 111 and 112, and one 300-level course.

1. Theory (six courses)Advisers: Nick Howe, Judy Franklin, Joseph O’Rourke, Ileana Streinu

This minor is appropriate for a student with a strong interest in the theoretical aspects of computer science.

Required courses:111 Computer Science I112 Computer Science IITwo distinct 200- or 300-level courses designated as TheoryOne other 200- or 300-level courseOne CSC 300-level course designated Theory (and not among those satisfying the previous requirements).

2. Programming (six courses)Advisers: Judith Cardell, Judy Franklin, Nick Howe, Ileana Streinu, Dominique Thiébaut

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149Computer Science

This minor is appropriate for a student with a strong interest in programming and software development.

Required courses:111 Computer Science I112 Computer Science IITwo distinct 200- or 300-level courses designated as

ProgrammingOne other 200- or 300-level courseOne CSC 300-level course designated Programming

(and not among those satisfying the previous requirements).

3. Systems (six courses)Advisers: Judith Cardell, Judy Franklin, Dominique Thiébaut

This minor is appropriate for a student with a strong interest in computer systems, computer engineering and computing environments.

Required courses:111 Computer Science I112 Computer Science IITwo distinct 200- or 300-level courses designated as SystemsOne other 200- or 300-level courseOne CSC 300-level course designated Systems (and not among those satisfying the previous requirements).

4. Computer Science and Language (six courses)

Adviser: Joseph O’Rourke

The goal of this minor is to provide the student with an understanding of the use of language as a means of communication between human beings and comput-ers.

Required courses:111 Computer Science I112 Computer Science II250 Foundations of Computer ScienceTwo of:280 Topics in Programming Languages290 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence293 Introduction to Translators and Compiler Design294 Computational Linguistics

One of:390 Seminar in Artificial Intelligence354 Seminar in Digital Sound and Music Processing

5. Mathematical Foundations of Computer Science (six courses)

Adviser: Michael Albertson

The goal of this minor is the study of algorithms, from the points of view of both a mathematician and a com-puter scientist, developing the correspondence between the formal mathematical structures and the abstract data structures of computer science.

Required courses:111 Computer Science I112 Computer Science II250 Foundations of Computer ScienceOne of:252 Algorithms274 Computational GeometryMTH 254 CombinatoricsMTH 353 Advanced Topics in Discrete Applied Mathematics

6. Digital Art (six courses equally balanced between Computer Science and Art)

Adviser: Joseph O’Rourke

This minor is designed to accommodate students who desire both grounding in studio art and the technical expertise to express their art through digital media requiring mastery of the underlying principles of com-puter science.

Three Computer Science courses are required. The CSC 102+105 sequence on the Internet and Web design provide the essentials of employing the Internet and the Web for artistic purposes; CSC 111 Computer Science I includes a more systematic introduction to computer science, and the basics of programming; and CSC 240 Computer Graphics gives an introduction to the principles and potential of graphics, 3D modeling, and animation. (Students with the equivalent of CSC 111 in high school would be required to substitute CSC 112 instead).

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Three art courses are required. ARH 101 will provide the grounding necessary to judge art within the context of visual studies. ARS 162 Introduction to Digital Media introduces the student to design via the medium of computers, and either ARS 263 Intermediate Digital Media or ARS 361 Digital Multimedia provides more advanced experience with digital art.

# Dept Number Title Credits Preq.1 CSC 102 How the Internet Works 2 none CSC 105 Interactive Web Documents 22 CSC 111 Computer Science I 4 none CSC 112 Computer Science II 4 none3 CSC 240 Computer Graphics 4 4 ARH 101 Approaches to Visual Representation 4 none5 ARS 162 Introduction to Digital Media 4 none IDP 130 Introduction to Media Arts and Technology 4 none6 ARS 263 Intermediate Digital Media 4 ARS 361 Interactive Digital Multimedia 4

On an ad hoc approval basis, substitution for one or more of the required courses would be permitted by various relevant Five-College courses, including those in the partial list below.

School Number TitleSmith DAN 377 Expressive Technology and MovementHampshire CS 0174 Computer Animation IHampshire CS 0334 Computer Animation IIMount Holyoke CS 331 GraphicsUMass ART 397F Digital Imaging: Offset LithoUMass ART 397F Digital Imaging: Photo EtchgUMass ART 397L Digital Imaging: Offset LithoUMass ART 697F Digital Imaging: Photo EtchgUMass EDUC 591A 3D Animation and Digital EditingUMass CMPSCI391F Graphic CommunicationsUMass CMPSCI 397C Interactive Multimedia Production

UMass CMPSCI397D Interactive Web Animation

Computer Science

7. Digital Music (six courses equally balanced between Computer Science and Music)

Adviser: Judy Franklin

This minor is designed to accommodate students who desire both grounding in music theory and composi-tion and the technical expertise to express their music through digital media that requires mastery of the underlying principles of computer science.

Three computer science courses are required. CSC 111 Computer Science I includes a systematic introduction to computer science, and the basics of programming concepts. CSC 112 Computer Science II includes study of data structures, algorithms and a study of recursion and the object-oriented programming paradigm. The programming goals of portability, efficiency and data abstraction are emphasized. One of CSC 220 or CSC 250. CSC 220 Advanced Programming Techniques fo-cuses on several advanced programming environments, and includes object-oriented programming, graphical user interfaces (GUIs), and principles of software en-gineering. CSC 250 Foundations of Computer Science concerns the mathematical theory of computing and examines automata and finite state machines, regular sets and regular languages; push-down automata and context-free languages; computability and Turing machines.

Three music courses are required. MUS 110 Analysis and Repertory is an introduction to formal analysis and tonal harmony, and a study of familiar pieces in the standard musical repertory. Regular written exer-cises in harmony and critical prose. MUS 111 may be substituted for students entering with the equivalent of 110. One of MUS 233 or MUS 212. MUS 233 Composi-tion covers basic techniques of composition, including melody, simple two-part writing, and instrumentation. The course includes analysis of representative litera-ture. MUS 212 20th Century Analysis is the study of major developments in 20th-century music. Writing and analytic work including non-tonal harmonic prac-tice, serial composition and other musical techniques. (Prerequisite: MUS 111 or permission of the instruc-tor). One of MUS 345 or CSC 354 (cross-listed in the music department). MUS 345 Electro-Acoustic Music is an introduction to musique concrete, analog synthesis, digital synthesis and sampling through practical work,

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151Computer Science

assigned reading, and listening. CSC 354 Seminar on Digital Sound and Music Processing includes areas of sound/music manipulation such as digital ma-nipulation of sound, formal models of machines and languages used to analyze and generate sound and music, and algorithms and techniques from artificial intelligence for music composition.

These requirements are summarized in the table below:# Dept Number Title Credits Preq.1 CSC 111 Computer Science I 4 none2 CSC 112 Computer Science II 4 CSC 1113 CSC 220 Advanced Programming 4 CSC 112 CSC 250 Foundations of Computer Science 4 CSC 111 MTH 1534 MUS 110 Analysis and Repertory 5 none5 MUS 233 Composition 4 MUS 110 MUS 212 20th Century Analysis 4 MUS 1116 MUS 345 Electro-Acoustic Music 4 MUS 110 MUS 233 Permission CSC 354 Seminar on Digital 4 CSC 112 Sound and CSC 250 Music Processing Permission

On an ad hoc approval basis, substitution for one or more of the required courses would be permitted by various relevant Five-College courses, including those in the partial list below.

School Number TitleAmherst Mus 65 Electroacoustic CompositionHampshire HACU-0290-1 Computer MusicMt. Holyoke Music 102f Music and TechnologyUMass Music 585 Fundamentals of Electronic MusicUMass Music 586 MIDI Studio Techniques

HonorsDirector: Joseph O’Rourke

430d Thesis8 creditsFull-year course; Offered each year

431 Thesis8 creditsOffered Fall 2006

Requirements: Normally the requirements for the ma-jor, with a thesis in the senior year. The specific pro-gram will be designed with the approval of the director.

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DanceVisiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term.

ProfessorsSusan Kay Waltner, M.S.Rodger Blum, M.F.A., Chair

Visiting Artist-in-ResidenceDonna Mejia, B.Sc.

Five-College Lecturer in DanceMarilyn Middleton-Sylla

Principal Pianist/LecturerJulius M. Robinson, B.S.

Instructors in DanceCandice Salyers, M.F.A.Kellie Lynch, M.F.A.Ariel Cohen, M.F.A.Lauren Brown, Ph.D.

Five College FacultyPaul Arslanian (Lecturer in Dance, University of Massachusetts)Billbob Brown, M.A. (Associate Professor, University of Massachusetts)Jim Coleman, M.F.A. (Professor, Mount Holyoke College)Ranjana Devi (Lecturer, University of Massachusetts, Fine Arts Center)Charles Flachs., M.A. (Associate Professor, Mount Holyoke College)

Rose Flachs (Associate Professor, Mount Holyoke College)Terese Freedman, B.A. (Professor, Mount Holyoke College)Constance Valis Hill, Ph.D. (Five College Associate Professor, Hampshire College)Peter Jones (Lecturer/Accompanist, Mount Holyoke College)Daphne Lowell, M.F.A., Five College Dance Department, Chair, (Professor, Hampshire College)Cathy Nicoli, M.F.A. (Visiting Assistant Professor, Hampshire College)Rebecca Nordstrom, M.F.A. (Professor, Hampshire College)Peggy Schwartz, M.A. (Professor, University of Massachusetts)Tom Vacanti, M.F.A. (Visiting Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts)Wendy Woodson, M.A. (Professor, Amherst College)

Teaching FellowsVanessa AnspaughAretha AokiAudra CarabettaMaura DonohueKara GoluxJillian GrunnahLona LeeMeredith Lyons

The Five College Dance Department combines the pro-grams of Amherst College, Hampshire College, Mount Holyoke College, Smith College and the University of Massachusetts. The faculty operates as a consortium, coordinating curricula, performances and services. The Five College Dance Department supports a variety of philosophical approaches to dance and provides an op-portunity for students to experience a wide spectrum of performance styles and techniques. Course offerings are coordinated among the campuses to facilitate registra-tion, interchange and student travel; students may take a dance course on any of the five campuses and receive credit at the home institution.

Students should consult the Five College Course Schedule (specifying times, locations and new course updates) online at www.fivecolleges.edu/dance.

A. Theory CoursesPreregistration for dance theory courses is strongly recommended. Enrollment in dance composition courses is limited to 20 students, and priority is given to seniors and juniors. “P” indicates that permission of the instructor is required. “L” indicates that enrollment is limited.

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153Dance

Dance Composition: Introductory through advanced study of elements of dance composition, including phrasing, space, energy, motion, rhythm, musical forms, character development and personal imagery. Course work emphasizes organizing and designing movement creatively and meaningfully in a variety of forms (solo, duet and group), and utilizing various devices and approaches, e.g., motif and development, theme and variation, text and spoken language, col-lage, structured improvisation and others.

All Dance Theory Courses: L {A} 4 credits

151 Elementary Dance CompositionL {A} 4 creditsCandice Salyers, Spring 2008UM, MHC (Coleman), AC (Woodson)Offered Fall 2007

252 Intermediate Dance CompositionPrerequisite: 151. L. {A} 4 creditsCandice SalyersOffered Fall 2007B. Scripts and ScoresTo be announcedTo be arranged

353 Advanced Dance CompositionPrerequisite: 252 or permission of the instructor. L. {A} 4 creditsA. Performance StudioAC (Woodson), HC (Nicoli)Offered Fall 2007

171 Dance in the 20th CenturyThis course is designed to present an overview of dance as a performing art in the 20th century, focusing espe-cially on major American stylistic traditions and artists. Through readings, video and film viewing, guest per-formances, individual research projects, and class dis-cussions, students will explore principles and traditions of 20th-century concert dance traditions, with special attention to their historical and cultural contexts. Spe-cial topics may include European and American bal-let, the modern dance movement, contemporary and avant-garde dance experimentation, African-American dance forms, jazz dance and popular culture dance traditions. L {A} WI 4 creditsLauren BrownOffered Spring 2008

241 Scientific Foundations of DanceAn introduction to selected scientific aspects of dance, including anatomical identification and terminology, physiological principles and conditioning/strengthen-ing methodology. These concepts are discussed and explored experientially in relationship to the movement vocabularies of various dance styles. Enrollment lim-ited to 20. {A} 4 creditsSusan WaltnerOffered Fall 2007

272 Dance and Culture Through a survey of world dance traditions from both artistic and anthropological perspectives, this course introduces students to dance as a universal human behavior, and to the many dimensions of its cultural practice—social, religious, political and aesthetic. Course materials are designed to provide students with a foundation for the interdisciplinary study of dance in society, and the tools necessary for analyzing cross-cul-tural issues in dance; they include readings, video and film viewing, research projects and dancing. (A prereq-uisite for Dance 375, Anthropology of Dance). L. {A} 4 creditsDaphne LowellOffered Spring 2008

285 Laban Movement Analysis ILaban Movement Analysis is a system used to describe and record quantitative and qualitative aspects of human movement. Through study and physical ex-ploration of concepts and principles involved in body articulation, spatial organization, dynamic exertion of energy and modes of shape change, students will examine their own movement patterns and preferences. This creates the potential for expanding personal reper-toire and developing skills in observation and analysis of the movement of others.To be announcedTo be arranged

287 Analysis of Music from a Dancer’s PerspectiveThis course is the study of music from a dancer’s per-spective. Topics include musical notation, rhythmic dictation, construction of rhythm and elements of composition. Dancers choreograph to specific compo-sitional forms, develop both communication between dancer and musician and music listening skills. Pre-requisite: one year of dance technique (recommended

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154 Dance

for sophom*ore year or later). Enrollment limited to 15. {A} 4 creditsUM (Arslanian)Offered Fall 2007

305 Advanced RepertoryThis course offers an in-depth exploration of aesthetic and interpretive issues in dance performance. Through experiments with improvisation, musical phrasing, partnering, personal imagery and other modes of developing and embodying movement material, danc-ers explore ways in which a choreographer’s vision is formed, altered, adapted and finally presented in per-formance. {A} 2 creditsRodger BlumOffered Fall 2007

Silvestre RepertoryBalanchine: Concerto BaroccoMark Morris: Canonic 3/4 StudiesTo be arranged

Ballet RepertoryTo be arranged

309 Advanced RepertoryThis course offers an in-depth exploration of aesthetic and interpretive issues in dance performance. Through experiments with improvisation, musical phras-ing, partnering, personal imagery and other modes of developing and embodying movement material, dancers explore ways in which a choreographer’s vi-sion is formed, altered, adapted and finally presented in performance. In its four-credit version, this course also requires additional readings and research into broader issues of historical context, genre and technical style. Course work may be developed through exist-ing repertory or through the creation of new work(s). Prerequisite: advanced technique or permission of the instructor. {A} 4 creditsDonna MejiaOffered Fall 2007

377 Advanced Studies in History and Aesthetics4 credits

Integrity in Ethnic/Global Dance FusionCultural misappropriation has an unfortunate and extensive history in dance. The exploration of ethnic/

cultural dance fusion mandates that artists reconcile the values and context of indigenous dance traditions with agendas of the entertainment world. This course will explore the inevitable transformation of old and new dance traditions in performance, and seek to define what responsibility choreographers/performers have as cultural ambassadors in a “cut and paste” environment. Class will include films, readings and discussions. Enrollment limited to 25. (E) {A}.Donna MejiaOffered Fall 2007

Expressive Technology and Movement This course will examine movement expression (physi-cal and digital) through the introduction of software tools that inspire, enhance and help create two dimen-sional expressive movement studies. Studies will be designed within the framework of digital or live perfor-mance creations. Enhancing, exploring, and redefining creative process is the primary goal of this course. Soft-ware for video editing, motion graphics, sound editing and creation, multilayered still images, and animation will be used as tools to create two and/or three dimen-sional final motion projects. Tools can also include cre-ative scanning techniques, video camera and lighting operations and digital keying/compositing. Readings concerning issues in human expression and aesthetics accompanied by threaded class discussions will also be required. The prerequisite for this course is one entry-level course in dance composition, studio art, music composition or theory, theatrical directing, or computer science (or permission of the instructor). Familiarity with the Macintosh platform in OSX is needed. Basic computer skills on this platform (or Windows) as well as mouse skills, shortcut knowledge, manipulation of windows and the desktop, saving files, and the organi-zation of folders are required. L. {A}Rodger BlumOffered Fall 2007

400 Special StudiesFor qualified juniors and seniors. A four-credit special studies is required of senior majors. Admission by per-mission of the instructor and the chair of the depart-ment. Departmental permission forms required. {A}1 to 4 creditsMembers of the departmentOffered both semesters each year

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B. Production Courses200 Dance ProductionA laboratory course based on the preparation and performance of department productions. Students may elect to fulfill course requirements from a wide array of production-related responsibilities, including per-formance, choreography and stage crew. May be taken four times for credit, with a maximum of two credits per semester. There will be one general meeting on Monday, September 10, 2007 at 4:10 p.m. in the Green Room, Theatre Building. Attendance is mandatory. {A} 1 creditTo be announcedOffered Fall 2007

200 Dance ProductionSame description as above. There will one general meeting on Monday, January 28, 2008 at 4:10 p.m. in the Green Room, Theatre Building. Attendance is mandatory. May be taken four times for credit, with maximum of two credits per semester. {A} 1 creditTo be announcedOffered Spring 2008

C. Studio CoursesStudents may repeat studio courses two times for credit. For a complete list of studio courses offered on the other four campuses, please consult the Five College Dance Department schedule available from the Smith dance office. Studio courses receive two credits. Preregistration for dance technique courses is strongly recommended. Enrollment is often limited to 25 students, and priority is given to seniors and juniors. Normally, students must take these two-credit courses in addition to a full course load. Studio courses may also require outside reading, video and film viewings and/or concert attendance. No more than 12 credits may be counted toward the degree. “P” indicates that permission of the instructor is required. “L” indicates that enrollment is limited. Placement will be determined within the first two weeks. Repetition of studio courses for credit: The Five Col-lege Dance Department faculty strongly recommends that students in the Five Colleges be allowed to take any one level of dance technique up to three times for

credit, and more with the permission of the academic adviser.

119 Beginning Contact ImprovisationA duet form of movement improvisation. The tech-nique will focus on work with gravity, weight support, balance, inner sensation and touch, to develop spon-taneous fluidity of movement in relation to a partner. Enrollment limited to 20. May be repeated once for credit. Alternates with DAN 217. {A} 2 creditsTo be announced, Fall 2007To be announced, Spring 2008Offered Fall 2007, Spring 2008

218 Floor Barre Movement TechniqueThis course combines classical and modern principles in a basic series performed on the floor. It is designed to help dance students achieve a more consistent techni-cal ability through added strength, stretch and develop-ment of fluid transition. Prerequisite: two semesters of ballet or modern dance technique. Enrollment limited to 20. {A} 2 creditsRodger BlumOffered Spring 2008

219 Intermediate Contact ImprovisationA duet form of movement improvisation. The technique will focus on work with gravity, weight support, bal-ance, inner sensation and touch, to develop spontane-ous fluidity of movement in relation to a partner. Pre-requisite: at least one previous dance technique course or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20. (E) {A} 2 creditsTo be announcedTo be arranged

TechniquesModern: Introductory through advanced study of mod-ern dance techniques. Central topics include: refining kinesthetic perception, developing efficient alignment, increasing strength and flexibility, broadening the range of movement qualities, exploring new vocabular-ies and phrasing styles, and encouraging individual investigation and embodiment of movement material.

113 Modern Dance IL. {A} 2 creditsTo be announced, Fall 2007To be announced, Spring 2008Offered both semesters each year at Smith and in the Five Colleges

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114 Modern Dance IIFor students who have taken Modern Dance I or the equivalent. L. {A} 2 creditsTo be announced, Fall 2007To be announced, Spring 2008Offered Fall 2007, Spring 2008

215 Modern Dance IIIPrerequisite: 113 and a minimum of one year of mod-ern dance study. L. {A} 2 creditsTo be announced, Fall 2007MHC, (Coleman)UM (Brown)Offered Fall 2007

216 Modern Dance IVPrerequisite: 215. L. {A} 2 creditsKellie Lynch, Fall 2007Donna Mejia, Spring 2008Offered Fall 2007, Spring 2008

317 Modern Dance VBy audition/permission only. Prerequisite: 216. L and P. {A} 2 creditsKellie LynchHC (Nicoli), MHCOffered Fall 2007

318 Modern Dance VIAudition required. Prerequisite: 317. L and P. {A} 2 creditsAriel CohenOffered Spring 2008

Ballet: Introductory through advanced study of the principles and vocabularies of classical ballet. Class is composed of three sections: Barre, Center and Allegro. Emphasis is placed on correct body alignment, develop-ment of whole body movement, musicality and em-bodiment of performance style. Pointe work is included in class and rehearsals at the instructor’s discretion.

120 Ballet IL. {A} 2 creditsSection 1: To be announced, Fall 2007Section 2: To be announced, Fall 2007MHC (R. Flachs), UM Fall 2007To be announced, Spring 2008Offered both semesters each year at Smith and in the Five Colleges

121 Ballet IIFor students who have taken Ballet I or the equivalent. L. {A} 2 creditsTo be announced, Fall 2007To be announced, Spring 2008Offered both semesters each year

222 Ballet IIIPrerequisite: 121 or permission of the instructor. L. {A} 2 creditsRodger BlumMHC (C. Flachs), UM (Vacanti)Offered Fall 2007

223 Ballet IVL. {A} 2 creditsTo be announcedMHC, UMOffered Spring 2008

324 Ballet VBy audition/permission only. L. {A} 2 creditsRodger BlumUM (Vacanti)Offered Fall 2007

325 Ballet VIBy audition/permission only. L. {A} 2 creditsRodger BlumMHCOffered Spring 2008

Jazz: Introductory through advanced jazz dance tech-nique, including the study of body isolations, move-ment analysis, syncopation and specific jazz dance traditions. Emphasis is placed on enhancing musical and rhythmic phrasing, efficient alignment, perfor-mance clarity in complex movement combinations and the refinement of performance style.

130 Jazz IL. {A} 2 creditsSection 1: To be announced, Fall 2007Section 2: To be announced, Fall 2007UM Fall 2007To be announced, Spring 2008Offered both semesters each year at Smith and in the Five Colleges

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131 Jazz IIFor students who have taken Jazz I or the equivalent. L. {A} 2 creditsTo be announced, Fall 2007To be announced, Spring 2008Offered both semesters each year

232 Jazz IIIFurther examination of jazz dance principles. L. {A} 2 creditsTo be announcedUMOffered Fall 2007

233 Jazz IVEmphasis on extended movement phrases, complex musicality, and development of jazz dance styles. L. {A} 2 creditsMHC, Fall 2007To be announced, Spring 2008Offered Fall 2007, Spring 2008

334 Jazz VAdvanced principles of jazz dancing. L. By audition/permission only. {A} 2 creditsUM, Fall 2007

335 Jazz VIAdvanced principles of jazz dancing. L. By audition/permission only. {A} 2 creditsTo be announcedOffered Spring 2008

Cultural Dance Forms I and IICultural Dance Forms presents differing dance tradi-tions from specific geographical regions or distinct movement forms that are based on the fusion of two or more cultural histories. The forms include social, concert, theatrical and ritual dance and are framed in the cultural context of the identified dance form. These courses vary in levels of technique: beginning and intermediate (I), and intermediate and advanced (II), and focus accordingly on movement fundamentals, integration of song and movement, basic through com-plex rhythms, perfection of style, ensemble and solo performance when applicable. Some classes include repertory performance and therefore vary in credits.

142 Cultural Dance Forms I

West African DanceThis course introduces African dance, music and song as a traditional mode of expression in various African countries. It emphasizes appreciation and respect for African culture and its profound influence on American culture and art. Enrollment limited to 30. {A} 2 creditsMarilyn Middleton-SyllaMHC, AC (Middleton-Sylla)Offered Fall 2007, Spring 2008

Tribal FusionTribal Fusion is rooted in the nomadic dance tradition of North Africa, the Middle East and Asia. The form has strong roots in women’s styles of Arabic folk dance and the vocabulary includes the influences of Rom (Gypsy) dance styles from India to Europe, Spanish, Flamenco, African Tribal forms, and more recently, American Hip Hop, Punk and Gothic cultures. Enrollment limited to 30. {A} 2 creditsDonna MejiaOffered Fall 2007, Spring 2008

243 Cultural Dance Forms II

West AfricanThis course is an exploration of the various dance styles, forms and symbols attributed to the classical societies of Western Africa. The course will focus on those dances whose origins are (historically) found in the Old Mali Empire, i.e. (Mali, Senegal, the Gambia, Guinea) as well as Nigeria and Ghana. It will specifi-cally examine the dance styles of the Serer, Lebou, Djio-lla, Bambara, Wolof, Sauce, Malinke, Manding, Yoruba and Twi peoples of these regions. Enrollment limited to 30. {A} 2 credits Not offered 2007–08

C. The MajorAdvisers: Rodger Blum, Susan Waltner

The dance major at Smith is offered through the Five College Dance Department and culminates in a bach-elor of arts degree from Smith College. It is designed to give a student a broad view of dance in preparation for a professional career or further study. Students are exposed to courses in dance history and anthropol-

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ogy, creative and aesthetic studies, scientific aspects of dance, the language of movement (Labanotation and Laban Movement Analysis), and dance technique and performance. For studio courses, no more than four courses in a single idiom will be counted toward the major. At least two of these courses must be at the ad-vanced level and within the requirements of Emphasis I or II (see below).

History Dance in the 20th Century (DAN 171) and Dance and Culture (DAN 272) serve as the introduction to the major. At the advanced level there is the Anthro-pological Basis of Dance (DAN 375) and more special-ized period courses or topics. These courses all examine the dance itself and its cultural context.

Creative and Aesthetic Studies (DAN 151, 252, 353 and 377) This sequence of courses begins with the most basic study of dance composition: space, time, energy, and focuses on tools for finding and developing movement. The second and third level courses develop the fundamentals of formal choreography and expand work in the manipulation of spatial design, dynamics, phrasing, rhythm, content and accompaniment. The movement materials that a student explores are not limited to any particular style.

Scientific Aspects of Dance (DAN 241, 342) These courses are designed to develop the student’s personal working process and her philosophy of movement. The student studies selected aspects of human anatomy, physiology, bio-mechanics and their relationships to various theories of technical study.

Language of Movement (DAN 285) Courses in this area train students to observe, experience and notate quali-tative aspects of movement (Laban Movement Analysis) and to quantitatively perceive and record movement (Labanotation).

Music for Dancers (DAN 287) Sharpens understanding of music fundamentals and makes these applicable to dance.

Emphasis I: Technique and Performance A dancer’s instrument is her body and it must be trained consis-tently. Students are encouraged to study several dance forms and styles. Students who will emphasize perfor-mance and choreography are expected to reach ad-vanced level in one or more forms. Public performance,

while optional and without additional credit, is encour-aged to realize dance skills before an audience

Requirements in Technique and Performance Emphasis:

1. 171 and 2722. 2413. 285 or 2874. 151, 200 (2 credits) and 2525. Five courses are required in dance technique for the

major. Students can explore up to four courses in a single form. At least two semesters must be at the advanced level. A single level of technique courses may be taken for credit up to three semesters.

6. Two courses from the following: 309, 342, 353, 375, 377.

7. DAN 400 (4 credits) must be taken in the senior year.

Emphasis II: Theoretical Practices Dance students may prefer to concentrate on an academic emphasis instead of dance performance. These students are also encouraged to study several dance forms and styles and they are expected to reach intermediate level in one or more forms.

Requirements in Theoretical Practices of Dance:

1. 171 and 2722. 2413. 285 or 287, or a 200 level course in another discipline4. 151, 200 (2 credits) and 3755. Five technique courses are required in the dance

theory emphasis of the major. Dance Theory stu-dents should explore at least two courses in two technique forms. Students should reach intermedi-ate level in at least one form. A single level of tech-nique courses may be taken for credit up to three semesters.

6. Two courses from the following: 309, 342 377.7. DAN 400 (4 credits) must be taken in the senior

year.

D. The MinorAdvisers: Members of the Smith College Department of Dance

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Students may fulfill the requirements for the minor in dance in either of the following concentrations:

1. Minor in Dance with an Emphasis in Theatrical Forms

Requirements: Three core courses: 151, 171 and 272. Three 2-credit studio courses; one in dance production: 200; and one other dance theory course chosen with the adviser, to fit the interests of the students.

2. Minor in Dance with an Emphasis in Cultural Forms

Requirements: Three core courses: 151, 272 and 375. Three 2-credit studio courses in cultural dance forms; one course in dance production: 200; and one other dance theory course chosen with the adviser, to fit the interests of the student.

Studio Courses: Studio courses receive two credits. Pre-registration for dance technique courses is strongly rec-ommended. Enrollment is often limited to 25 students, and priority is given to juniors and seniors. Normally students must take partial-credit courses in addition to a full-course load. No more than 12 credits may be counted toward the degree. “P” indicates that permis-sion of the instructor is required. “L” indicates that enrollment is limited. Placement will be determined within the first two weeks of classes. Within limits, stu-dents may repeat studio courses for credit.

Studio Courses:142 Beginning/Intermediate Cultural Dance Forms A. West African B. Comparative Caribbean Dance C. Cuban D. Haitian E. Introduction to Flamenco F. Javanese G. Afro-Brazilian H. Middle Eastern I. Tribal Fusion243 Intermediate/Advanced Cultural Dance Forms A. West African II B. Comparative Caribbean Dance II113 Modern Dance I114 Modern Dance II215 Modern Dance III

216 Modern Dance IV317 Modern Dance V318 Modern Dance VI120 Ballet I121 Ballet II222 Ballet III223 Ballet IV324 Ballet V325 Ballet VI130 Jazz I131 Jazz II232 Jazz III233 Jazz IV334 Jazz V335 Jazz VI136 Tap I137 Tap II

Honors430d Thesis8 creditsFull-year course; Offered each year

431 Thesis8 creditsOffered each Fall

E. Five College CoursesStudents should consult the Five College Dance Depart-ment course schedule (specifying times, locations and new course updates) online at www.fivecolleges.edu/dance/schedule.html

Adviser: Rodger Blum

F. Graduate: M.F.A. ProgramAdviser: Susan Waltner

“P” indicates that permission of the instructor is re-quired.

510 Theory and Practice of Dance IAStudio work in dance technique, including modern, ballet, tap, cultural dance and jazz. Eight to 10 hours

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of studio work and weekly seminars. P. 5 creditsRodger BlumOffered both semesters each year

520 Theory and Practice of Dance IIAStudio work in dance technique and weekly seminars. Prerequisite: 510. P. 5 creditsRodger BlumOffered both semesters each year

521 Choreography as a Creative ProcessAdvanced work in choreographic design and related production design. Study of the creative process and how it is manifested in choreography. Prerequisite: two semesters of choreography. 5 creditsSusan WaltnerOffered Fall 2007

540 History and Literature of DanceEmphasis will include: in-class discussion and study of dance history and dance research, current research methods in dance, the use of primary and secondary source material. Students will complete a dance history research paper on a topic of their choice. Prerequisite: two semesters of dance history. 5 creditsTo be announcedOffered Fall 2008

553 Choreography by DesignThis class will examine and engage the choreographic process through a study of the interaction of expressive movement with concrete and abstract design ideas. Music and sound, lighting, costuming, projected video, and set/sculpture installations may all be analyzed as design elements to deepen the choreography of human movement. Choreographic ideas developed in this class will be based on the premise that design elements can be used as source material for choreographic intent. Choreography and theatrical design will be examined as art forms that merge to create a unified vision of tex-ture, color, gesture, shape and movement. In addition to studies and projects, weekly writings will be assigned. Prerequisites: two semesters of choreography (or equiv-alent), familiarity with basic music theory, coursework in theatrical production (or equivalent) 5 creditsRodger BlumOffered Spring 2009

560 Scientific Principles in the Teaching of DanceThis course is designed to assist graduate students as they teach dance technique. The principles of anatomy, injury prevention and rehabilitation, and nutrition are examined in relation to fundamentals of dance pedagogy; expressive dance aesthetics are examined formally within a context of current body science. Through analysis of body alignment, safe and efficient movement patterns, and proper nutritional needs, students learn methods that increase efficiency, clarity, strength and coordination and that ultimately achieve desired aesthetic goals. Class work includes lectures, experiential application and computer analyses to reinforce a rigorous understanding of the scientific principles and body mechanics that are observed within dance performance as well as in excellent teaching of dance. Prerequisite: DAN 241 or the equivalent. {A} 5 creditsSusan WaltnerOffered Spring 2008

590 Research and ThesisProduction project.5 creditsSusan WaltnerOffered both semesters each year

591 Special Studies5 creditsOffered both semesters each year

Other Five College Dance Department CoursesDance 316 Contemplative Dance—HC (Lowell)

Techniques (2 credits)UM Dance 291 Seminar: Yoga, Breath, Flow, Presence, Performance (Schwartz)

Technique and Repertory (4 credits at AC, HC, MHC and SC; 3 credits at UM)UM Dance 195R Classical Indian Dance I—UM (Devi)UM Dance 295R Classical Indian Dance II—UM (Devi)

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Technique and Theory (4 credits at AC, HC, MHC and SC; 3 credits at UM)Dance 153 Dance as an Art Form—MHC (Coleman)Dance 261 Introduction to Dance—UM (Schwartz)HA 294 The Embodied Imagination (Lowell)

Theory (4 credits at AC, HC, MHC and SC; 3 credits at UM)HA 153 Dance as an Art Form—HC (Nordstrom), MHCContemporary Artists Issues—AC (Woodson), MHC Art Criticism—MHCHACU 278 Black Traditions in American Dance—HC (Hill)UM Dance 273 Jazz Tap Dancing in America: History and Practice—UM (Hill)

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East Asian Lan guag es and Lit er a tures

Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term.

Professor§1 J Thomas Rohlich, Ph.D.

Associate Professors**2 Maki Hirano Hubbard, Ph.D.Deirdre Sabina Knight, Ph.D, Chair

Assistant Professors†1 Kimberly Kono, Ph.D.†2 Sujane Wu, Ph.D.

Visiting Assistant ProfessorYuri Kumagai, Ed.D.

LecturersAmy C. Franks, M.A.Jing Hu, M.A.Suk Massey, C.A.G.S.Atsuko Takahashi, M.S. Ed.Grant Xiaoguang Li, Ph.D.Ling Zhao, M.A.

The Department of East Asian Languages and Lit-eratures offers a major in East Asian languages and cultures with concentrations in China or Japan, and a minor in East Asian languages and literatures with concentrations in China, Japan or Korea. Students planning on spending their junior year abroad should consult the department concerning the list of courses to be credited toward the major or minor and must seek final approval for the courses upon their return.

Courses in EnglishEAL 231 The Culture of the Lyric in Traditional ChinaThis course surveys the masterworks of the Chinese lyric tradition from its oral beginnings in pre-Confu-cian times through the Yuan dynasty. Through the careful reading of selected works including shaman’s hymns, protest poetry, and excerpts from the great novels, students will inquire into how the spiritual, philosophical and political concerns dominating the poets’ milieu shaped the lyric language through the ages. No knowledge of Chinese language or literature is required. {L} 4 creditsSujane WuOffered Fall 2007

EAL 232 Modern Chinese LiteratureSelected readings in translation of Chinese literature from the late-Qing dynasty to contemporary Taiwan and the People’s Republic of China. This course will offer (1) a window on 20th-century China (from the Sino-Japanese War of 1895 to the present) and (2) an introduction to the study of literature: (a) why we read literature, (b) different approaches (e.g., how to do a close reading) and (c) literary movements. We will stress the socio-political context and questions of politi-cal engagement, social justice, class, gender, race and human rights. All readings are in English translation and no background in China or Chinese is required. {L} 4 creditsSabina KnightOffered Spring 2008

EAL 238 Literature from TaiwanHow do works from Taiwan contend with legacies of political trauma and the social consequences of mod-ernization and democratization? In the face of disloca-tion, marginality and materialism, how does writing nurture memory, belonging, social repair or change? Close readings of stories and, some semesters, essays, poetry, novels or films will explore traditional aesthet-ics, the modernist, nativist and localist movements of

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the 1960s and 1970s, and the pluralism of the 1990s and since, including feminist and queer fiction. Class participation will include student-centered contempla-tive and collaborative exercises, including short written meditations and dramatizations. No background in Chi-nese is required. Enrollment limited to 19. {L} 4 creditsSabina KnightOffered Fall 2007

EAL 240 Japanese Language and CultureThis course is designed to enhance students’ knowl-edge and understanding of the Japanese language by relating linguistic, social and historical aspects of Japanese culture as well as the Japanese perception of the dynamic of human interactions. Starting with a brief review of structural and cultural characteristics of the language, we will move on to examine predomi-nant beliefs about the relationship between Japanese language and cultural or interpersonal perceptions, including politeness and gender. Basic knowledge of Japanese is desirable. All readings are in English trans-lation. {S} 4 creditsMaki HubbardOffered Spring 2008

EAL 241 Literature and Culture in Premodern Japan: Court Ladies, Wandering Monks and Urban RakesA study of Japanese literature and its cultural roots from the 8th to the 19th centuries. The course will focus on enduring works of the Japanese literary tradition, along with the social and cultural conditions that gave birth to the literature. All readings are in English translation. {L} 4 creditsAmy FranksOffered Fall 2007

EAL 242 Modern Japanese LiteratureA survey of Japanese literature from the late 19th century to the present. In the past 150 years Japan has undergone tremendous change: rapid industrialization, imperial and colonial expansion, occupation follow-ing its defeat in the Pacific War, and emergence as a global economic power. The literature of modern Japan reflects the complex aesthetic, cultural and political effects of such changes. Through our discussions of these texts, we will also address theoretical questions about such concepts as identity, gender, race, sexuality, nation, class, colonialism, modernism and translation. All readings are in English translation. {L} 4 creditsAmy FranksOffered Spring 2008

EAL 248 The Tale of the Genji and The Pillow BookIn this course, we study in depth two of the most im-portant works of Japanese literature, both of which were written by women in 10th-century Japan. We examine the style, structure and themes of the two texts and the world from which they emerged. Topics include the culture and history of the Heian court, marriage prac-tices, literary influences and antecedents, Japanese aes-thetics, wit and humor, the poetic tradition, Buddhist beliefs, female writing and later reception. Modern fiction and other works (movies, anime, etc.) based on or influenced by these two works will also be discussed. All works will be read in English. (E) {L} 4 creditsAmy FranksOffered Spring 2008

EAL 260 Health and Illness: Literary ExplorationsHow do languages, social norms and economic con-texts shape experiences of health and illness? How do conceptions of selfhood, sexuality, belonging and spirituality inform ideas about well-being, disease, intervention and healing? This cross-cultural literary inquiry into bodily and emotional experiences will also explore Western biomedical and traditional Chinese diagnosis and treatment practices. From despair and chronic pain to cancer, aging and death, how do suf-ferers and their caregivers adapt in the face of infirmity or trauma? Our study will also consider how stories and other genres can help develop resilience, compassion and hope. Enrollment limited to 19. {L} 4 creditsSabina KnightOffered Spring 2008

EAL 360 Seminar: Topics in East Asian Languages and LiteraturesTopic: The World Turned Upside Down: Warfare, Religion and Women in Medieval Japan. An explora-tion of the great upheavals that took place beginning in the 12th century as seen through the genre of war tales (gunki monogatari). Looking at texts that nar-rate historical conflict and rebellion, we examine the literary, social and historical nature of these tales. Topics include the rise of the warrior culture and its accompanying social changes, the samurai ethic, representations of violence and attitudes toward death, the Buddhist worldview, medieval storytelling practices, historical accuracy and the role of women. Films will also be featured.Amy FranksOffered Fall 2007

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EAL 400 Special StudiesFor students engaged in independent projects or re-search in connection with Japanese, Chinese, or Korean language and literature.2 to 4 creditsOffered both semesters each year

East Asian Language CoursesA language placement test is required prior to regis-tration for students who have previously studied the language.

Chinese LanguageCHI 110 Chinese I (Intensive)An intensive introduction to spoken Mandarin and modern written Chinese, presenting basic elements of grammar, sentence structures and active mastery of the most commonly used Chinese characters. Emphasis on development of oral/aural proficiency, pronunciation, and the acquisition of skills in reading and writing Chinese characters. 5 creditsJing Hu, Grant Li and Sujane WuOffered each Fall

CHI 111 Chinese I (Intensive)A continuation of 110. Prerequisite: CHI 110 or permis-sion of the instructor. {F} 5 creditsJing Hu, Grant Li and Sujane WuOffered each Spring

CHI 220 Chinese II (Intensive)Continued emphasis on the development of oral pro-ficiency and functional literacy in modern Mandarin. Conversation and narrative practice, reading exercises, short composition assignments, and work with audio-visual materials. Prerequisite: 111 or permission of the instructor. {F} 5 creditsLing Zhao and to be announcedOffered each Fall

CHI 221 Chinese II (Intensive)A continuation of 220. Prerequisite: CHI 220 or permis-sion of the instructor. {F} 5 creditsLing Zhao and to be announcedOffered each Spring

CHI 301 Chinese IIIBuilding on the skills and vocabulary acquired in Chinese II, students will learn to read simple essays on topics of common interest and will develop the ability to understand, summarize and discuss social issues in contemporary China. Readings will be supplemented by audio-visual materials. Prerequisite: 221 or permis-sion of the instructor. {F} 4 creditsJing HuOffered each Fall

CHI 302 Chinese IIIIntroduction to the use of authentic written and visual documents commonly encountered in China today, with an emphasis on television news broadcasts and newspaper articles. Exercises in composition as well as oral presentations will complement daily practice in reading and listening comprehension. Prerequisite: 301 or permission of the instructor. {F} 4 creditsJing HuOffered each Spring

CHI 350 Advanced Readings in Chinese: Modern Literary TextsDevelopment of advanced oral and reading proficiency through the study and discussion of selected modern Chinese literary texts. Students will explore literary expression in original works of fiction, including short stories, essays, novellas and excerpts of novels. Prerequisite: 302 or permission of the instructor. {L/F} 4 creditsGrant LiOffered each Fall

CHI 351 Advanced Readings in Chinese: Modern and Contemporary TextsIn contrast with CHI 350, this course focuses on readings of political and social import. Through the in-depth study and discussion of essays drawn from a variety of sources, students will increase their understanding of modern and contemporary China. Prerequisite: 302 or permission of the instructor. {L/F} 4 creditsLing ZhaoOffered each Spring

Japanese LanguageJPN 110 Japanese I (Intensive)An introduction to spoken and written Japanese. Em-

East Asian Lan guag es and Lit er a tures

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phasis on the development of basic oral proficiency, along with reading and writing skills. Students will acquire knowledge of basic grammatical patterns, strategies in daily communication, hiragana, kataka-na and about 90 Kanji. Designed for students with no background in Japanese. {F} 5 creditsYuri Kumagai, Maki Hubbard, To be announcedOffered each Fall

JPN 111 Japanese I (Intensive)A continuation of 110. Development of utilization of grammar and fluency in conversational communica-tion. About 150 more kanji will be introduced for read-ing and writing. Prerequisite: JPN 110 or permission of the instructor. {F} 5 creditsMaki Hubbard, Yuri Kumagai, To be announcedOffered each Spring

JPN 220 Japanese II (Intensive)Course focuses on further development of oral profi-ciency, along with reading and writing skills. Students will attain intermediate proficiency while deepening their understanding of the social and cultural context of the language. Prerequisite: 111 or permission of the instructor. {F} 5 creditsAtsuko Takahashi, To be announcedOffered each Fall

JPN 221 Japanese II (Intensive)A continuation of 220. Prerequisite: JPN 220 or permis-sion of the instructor. {F} 5 creditsAtsuko Takahashi, To be announcedOffered each Spring

JPN 301 Japanese IIIDevelopment of high intermediate proficiency in speech and reading through study of varied prose pieces and audio-visual materials. Prerequisite: 221 or per-mission of the instructor. {F} 4 creditsYuri KumagaiOffered each Fall

JPN 302 Japanese IIIA continuation of 301. Prerequisite: 301 or permission of the instructor. {F} 4 creditsYuri KumagaiOffered each Spring

JPN 350 Contemporary TextsStudy of selected contemporary texts including litera-ture and journalism from print and electronic media. Focus will be on developing reading and discussion

skills in Japanese using original materials and on un-derstanding various aspects of modern Japan through its contemporary texts. Prerequisite: JPN 302 or permis-sion of the instructor. {F} 4 creditsTo be announcedOffered Fall 2007

JPN 351 Contemporary Texts IIContinued study of selected contemporary texts includ-ing fiction and short essays from print and electronic media. This course further develops advanced read-ing, writing and discussion skills in Japanese, and enhances students’ understanding of various aspects of contemporary Japanese society. Prerequisite: JPN 302 or permission of the instructor. {F} 4 creditsAmy FranksOffered Spring 2008

Korean LanguageKOR 110 Korean IAn introduction to spoken and written Korean. Em-phasis on oral proficiency with the acquisition of basic grammar, reading and writing skills. This course is designed for students with little or no background in Korean. 4 creditsSuk MasseyOffered each Fall

KOR 111 Korean IA continuation of 110. Prerequisite: 110 or permission of the instructor. {F} 4 creditsSuk MasseyOffered each Spring

KOR 220 Korean IIThis course places equal emphasis on oral/aural proficiency, grammar, and reading and writing skills. Various aspects of Korean society and culture are pre-sented with weekly visual materials. Prerequisite: 111 or permission of the instructor. {F} 4 creditsSuk MasseyOffered each Fall

KOR 221 Korean IIA continuation of 220. Prerequisite: 220 or permission of the instructor. {F} 4 creditsSuk MasseyOffered each Spring

East Asian Lan guag es and Lit er a tures

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KOR 351 Advanced Studies in Korean Language and LiteratureThis course further develops advanced reading, writing and speaking skills through original literary texts in Korean. Students will read a wide selection of the most representative modern Korean literary works (including short stories, novellas, excerpts of novels, essays, poetry and plays) by well-known Korean writers. Class will be conducted in Korean. Prerequisite: 350 or permission of the instructor. {F} 4 creditsSuk MasseyOffered Spring 2008

The Major in East Asian Languages and CulturesPrerequisitesThe first year of Chinese (CHI 110 and 111) or Japanese (JPN 110 and 111) is a prerequisite for admission to the major. A language placement test is required prior to registration for students who have previously studied the language.

Advisers: Members of the department

Requirements: Students are expected to concentrate in China or Japan and take a total of 11 courses (46 cred-its), distributed as follows:

1. Language: a. Second-year language courses (10 credits): JPN 220 and 221 or CHI 220 and 221 (2 courses). b. Third-year language courses (8 credits): JPN 301 and 302 or CHI 301 and 302 (2 courses). Students whose proficiency places them beyond the third year should substitute advanced lan- guage or literature courses for this requirement.

2. Literature:a. At least three EAL courses (12 credits) in the lit-

erature or culture of the student’s concentration, including a departmental seminar. Students concentrating on China are encouraged to take EAL 231 and 232, and they must take at least one of these two courses. Students focusing on Japan are encouraged to take EAL 241 and 242, and they must take at least one of these courses.

b. At least one course (4 credits) focusing prin-cipally on the literature of another East Asian country.

3. Electives:Three additional courses (12 credits) may be chosen from other advanced language or literature courses in the department, or, at the recommendation of the ad-viser, from related courses in other departments.

Of the eleven required courses, no more than five normally shall be taken in other institutions, such as Five Colleges, Junior Year Abroad programs, or summer programs. Students should consult their advisers prior to taking such courses. S/U grading options are not allowed for courses counting toward the major. Native speakers of a language are encouraged to take another East Asian language.

Advanced Language Courses:CHI 310 Readings in Classical Chinese Prose and PoetryCHI 350 Advanced Readings in Chinese: Modern Literary TextsCHI 351 Advanced Readings in Chinese: Modern and Contemporary TextsJPN 350 Contemporary Texts IJPN 351 Contemporary Texts IIKOR 350 Advanced Studies in Korean Language and SocietyKOR 351 Advanced Studies in Korean Language and Literature

Courses taught in English:EAL 231 The Culture of the Lyric in Traditional ChinaEAL 232 Modern Chinese LiteratureEAL 236 Modernity: East and WestEAL 237 Chinese Poetry and the Other ArtsEAL 238 Literature from TaiwanEAL 240 Japanese Language and CultureEAL 241 Court Ladies, Wandering Monks and Urban Rakes: Literature and Culture in Premodern JapanEAL 242 Modern Japanese LiteratureEAL 243 Japanese Poetry in Cultural ContextEAL 244 Construction of Gender in Modern Japanese Women’s WritingEAL 245 Writing the “Other” in Modern Japanese LiteratureEAL 248 The Tale of Genji and The Pillow BookEAL 260 Health and Illness: Literary ExplorationsEAL 261 Major Themes in Literature: East-West Perspectives (topic course)EAL 360 Seminar: Topics in East Asian Languages and Literatures (topic course)

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HonorsDirector: Sabina Knight

430d Thesis(8 credits)Full-year course; Offered each year

431 Thesis 8 creditsOffered each Fall

Requirements: Same as for the departmental major plus the thesis, normally written in both semesters of the senior year (430d), with an oral examination on the thesis. In special cases, the thesis may be written in the first semester of the senior year (431).

The Minor in East Asian Languages and LiteraturesAdvisers: Members of the department

The course requirements are designed so that a student will concentrate on one of the East Asian languages, but will have the option of being exposed to the other courses in the department.

Prerequisites The first year of Chinese (CHI 110 and 111), Japanese (JPN 110 and 111) or Korean (KOR 110 and 111) is a prerequisite for admission.

Requirements:A total of six courses (26 credits) in the following distri-bution, no more than three of which shall be taken in other institutions. Students should consult the depart-ment prior to taking courses in other institutions.

1. Chinese II (CHI 220 and 221), Japanese II (JPN 220 and 221) or Korean II (KOR 220 and 221). (10 credits)

2. Four courses, at least two of which must be EAL courses, chosen from the following:

EAL 231 The Culture of the Lyric in Traditional ChinaEAL 232 Modern Chinese LiteratureEAL 236 Modernity: East and WestEAL 237 Chinese Poetry and the Other ArtsEAL 238 Literature from TaiwanEAL 240 Japanese Language and CultureEAL 241 Court Ladies, Wandering Monks and Urban Rakes: Literature and Culture in Premodern JapanEAL 242 Modern Japanese LiteratureEAL 244 Construction of Gender in Modern Japanese Women’s WritingEAL 245 Writing, Japan and OthernessEAL 248 The Tale of Genji and The Pillow BookEAL 260 Health and Illness: Literary ExplorationsEAL 261 Major Themes in Literature (topic course)EAL 360 Seminar: Topics in East Asian Languages and LiteraturesEAL 400 Special StudiesCHI 301 Chinese IIICHI 302 Chinese III (A continuation of 301)CHI 310 Readings in Classical Chinese Prose and PoetryCHI 350 Advanced Readings in Chinese: Modern Literary TextsCHI 351 Advanced Readings in Chinese: Modern and Contemporary SocietyJPN 301 Japanese IIIJPN 302 Japanese III (A continuation of 301)JPN 350 Contemporary Texts IJPN 351 Contemporary Texts IIKOR 301 Korean IIIKOR 302 Korean III (A continuation of 301)KOR 351 Advanced Studies in Korean Language and Literature

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East Asian StudiesVisiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term.

East Asian Studies Advisory Committee**1, *2 Daniel K. Gardner, Professor of History Marylin Rhie, Professor of Art and of East Asian StudiesPeter N.Gregory, Professor of ReligionDennis Yasutomo, Professor of GovernmentSuzanne Z. Gottschang, Associate Professor of Anthropology and East Asian Studies, DirectorMarnie Anderson, Assistant Professor of History†1 Kimberly Kono, Assistant Professor of East Asian Languages and LiteraturesJina Kim, Lecturer in East Asian Studies

Participating FacultySteven M. Goldstein, Professor of Government**2 Jamie Hubbard, Professor of Religion and Yehan Numata Lecturer in Buddhist Studies**2 Maki Hirano Hubbard, Associate Professor of East Asian Languages and LiteraturesDeirdre Sabina Knight, Assistant Professor of East Asian Languages and Literatures§1 Thomas Rohlich, Professor of East Asian Languages and Literatures†2 Sujane Wu, Assistant Professor of East Asian Languages and Literatures

The MajorThe major in East Asian studies offers students an op-portunity to develop a coherent and comprehensive un-derstanding of the great civilizations of the Asia Pacific region. The study of East Asia should be considered an integral part of a liberal arts education. Through an in-terdisciplinary study of these diverse cultures, students engage in a comparative study of their own societies and values. The major also reflects the emergence of East Asia politically, economically and culturally onto the world scene especially during the last century and anticipates the continued importance of the region in the future. It therefore helps prepare students for post-graduation endeavors ranging from graduate training to careers in both the public and private sectors dealing with East Asia.

Requirements for the MajorI. Basis Courses:

1. An East Asian Language: The second year of an East Asian language, which can be fulfilled by Chinese 220 and 221, Japanese 220 and 221, or Korean 220 and 221, or higher level courses. Extensive

language study is encouraged, but only two courses at the second-year level or higher will count toward the major. Normally, language courses will be taken at Smith. Students with native or near-na-tive fluency in an East Asian language must take a second East Asian language. Native and near-native fluency is defined as competence in the language above the fourth-year level.

II. Survey Courses

1. One survey course on the pre-modern civilization of an East Asian country: EAS 215, HST 211, HST 212, or HST 220

2. EAS 100 Introduction to Modern East Asia (normally by the second year).3. EAS 200 Colloquium: Topics in East Asian Studies

open to sophom*ores and juniors (normally taken in the sophom*ore year).

III. Electives

1. Five elective courses, which shall be determined in consultation with the adviser from the list of ap-proved courses.

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169East Asian Studies

a) Four of the elective courses shall constitute an area of concentration, which can be an empha-sis on the civilization of one country (China, Japan, or Korea) or a thematic concentration (e.g., comparative modernization, religious tra-ditions, women and gender, political economy, thought and art). Other concentrations may be formulated in consultation with an adviser.

b) Electives must include courses in both the hu-manities and social sciences.

c) Electives must include courses on more than one East Asian country.

d) One of the elective courses must be a Smith seminar on East Asia.

e) At least half of the course credits toward the major must be taken at Smith.

f) No more than one 100-level course shall count as an elective.

2. Smith courses not included on the approved list may count toward the major under the following conditions:

a) The student obtains the approval of her adviserb) No more than one such course shall be applied

toward the major.

3. A student may honor in East Asian studies (EAS 430d). Honors requires a 3.0 GPA overall and 3.3 GPA in the major. Four credits of honors thesis work may substitute for the seminar requirement.

4. Junior Year Abroad programs are encouraged at college-approved institutions in East Asia. EAS rec-ommends the Associated Kyoto Program for Japan, ACC for China, and Ewha Woman’s University for Korea. Courses taken at JYA programs, as well as courses taken away from Smith at other institu-tions, may count toward the major under the fol-lowing conditions:

a) The courses are reviewed and approved by the East Asian Studies Advisory Committee upon completion.

b) Courses taken away from Smith must not total more than half of the credits counted toward the major.

Advisers: Marnie Anderson, Daniel K. Gardner, Peter Gregory, Marylin Rhie, Dennis Yasutomo, Suzanne Z. Gottschang, Kimberly Kono

EAS 100 Introduction to Modern East AsiaThis course looks comparatively at the histories of China, Japan, Korea from the late 18th century to the present. It examines the struggles of these countries to preserve or regain their independence and establish their national identities in a rapidly emerging and often violent modern world order. While each of these countries has its own distinctive identity, their over-lapping histories (and dilemmas) give the region a coherent identity. We also will look at how individuals respond to and are shaped by larger historical move-ments. {H} 4 creditsMarnie Anderson and Jina KimOffered Fall 2007

EAS 200 Colloquium: Topics in East Asian StudiesFocusing on a theme of significance to the region, this course is designed to introduce students to the variety of methods of inquiry used for research in the inter-disciplinary field of East Asian studies. Students will be introduced to methods of locating and analyzing in-formation and sources, developing research questions, and writing in the course of the semester. Normally taken in the sophom*ore or junior year. Also open to non-EAS majors.

(Pending CAP Approval)Topic for Spring 2008: Humans and Nature in China.Recent reports of dramatic environmental destruction resulting from rapid economic development, a large population, and limited availability of arable land have incited global alarm about human impact on the environment in China. The human challenge to environmental health in China today must take into account a range of forces—philosophical, cultural, historical, political and economic—that together shape Chinese ideas about nature and the relationship between human “progress” and the environment. This course examines these forces as a way to understand past and present Chinese society. Prerequisite: EAS 100. Enrollment limited to 18. {H/A/S} 4 creditsSuzanne GottschangOffered Spring 2008

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170 East Asian Studies

EAS 216 Urban Modernity in Colonized KoreaWith a population of 21 million, congested streets, and soaring skyscrapers, Seoul has become an important socioeconomic, political and cultural center. This course explores the colonial history of the city begin-ning with Japanese colonization of Korea during the first half of the 20th century. It moves on to a consider-ation of the postwar U.S. military occupation of South Korea during the latter half of the 20th century and traces changes in the city’s culture, people, politics, commerce and industry. Attention will be given to the entrance of new technology, rise of new architectural spaces, emergence of new subjectivities and migration of people. (E) {H} 4 creditsJina KimOffered Spring 2008

EAS 217 Colloquium: Korean Popular Culture: Translating Tradition Into Pop CultureThis course investigates and evaluates contemporary South Korean popular culture and the 21st century cul-tural phenomenon called hallyu (Korean Wave). It will consider the popularity of the Wave and the backlash against it both in East Asia and globally. It will raise the issue of how film, television, music, manhwa (comic books), sports and the Internet participate in the trans-national production and circulation of culture, identity, modernity, tradition, ideology and politics. The course aims to equip students with analytical tools to critically think about and understand popular culture. Enroll-ment limited to 18. (E) {H} 4 creditsJina KimOffered Fall 2007

EAS 219 Modern Korean HistoryThis course is a general survey of Korean political, social, economic and cultural histories from the mid-19th century through the present. We will examine major events such as the 1876 opening of ports, 1910 colonization by Japan, the March First movement of 1919, liberation and division in 1945, the Korean War, democratization since 1987, the 1997 financial crisis, and the 2000 Inter-Korea cultural changes such as modernization, nationalism, industrialization and urbanization, changing gender relations, the nuclear issue, and the Korean Wave (Hallyu). {H} 4 creditsJina KimOffered Fall 2007

EAS 270 Colloquium in East Asian Studies

Art of KoreaArchitecture, sculpture, painting and ceramic art of Korea from Neolithic times to the 18th century. {A/H} 4 creditsMarylin RhieOffered Fall 2007

Japanese Buddhist ArtStudy of the Japanese Buddhist art traditions in archi-tecture, sculpture, painting, gardens and the tea cer-emony from the 6th to the 19th centuries. {A/H} 4 creditsMarylin RhieOffered Spring 2008

EAS 279 Colloquium: The Art and Culture of TibetThe architecture, painting and sculpture of Tibet are presented within their cultural context from the period of the Yarlung dynasty (seventh century) through the rule of the Dalai Lamas to the present. {A/H} 4 creditsMarylin RhieOffered Fall 2008

EAS 350 Seminar: Modern Girls and Marxist Boys: Consumerism, Colonialism and Gender in East AsiaThis course explores discourses of modern “femininity” and modern “masculinity” through the study of the two iconic figures to emerge in the early 20th century: Modern Girls and Marxist Boys. Through these figures, the course seeks to enrich our understanding of gen-dered politics, consumer culture, colonial modernity, and international relations, and the important histori-cal relationship between modernity and Marxism in East Asia. Enrollment limited to 12. (E) {H} 4 creditsJina KimOffered Spring 2008

EAS 375 Seminar: Japan–United States RelationsAnalysis of political, economic, cultural, and racial roots of U.S.–Japan relations from the 19th century to the present. Emphasis on current mutual perceptions and their potential impact on future bilateral relations. {S} 4 creditsDennis YasutomoOffered Spring 2008

EAS 404 Special Studies4 creditsOffered both semesters each year

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171East Asian Studies

EAS 408d Special Studies8 creditsFull-year course; Offered each year

EAS 430d Honors Thesis8 creditsFull-year course; Offered each year

Approved Courses in the HumanitiesARH 101 Buddhist ArtARH 120 Introduction to Art History: AsiaARH 222 The Art of ChinaARH 224 The Art of JapanEAL 231 The Culture of the Lyric in Traditional ChinaEAL 232 Modern Chinese LiteratureEAL 236 Modernity: East and WestEAL 237 Chinese Poetry and the Other ArtsEAL 240 Japanese Language and CultureEAL 241 Court Ladies, Wandering Monks, and Urban

RakesEAL 242 Modern Japanese LiteratureEAL 243 Japanese Poetry in Cultural ContextEAL 244 Construction of Gender in Modern Japanese

Women’s WritingEAL 245 Writing, Japan and OthernessEAL 261 Major Themes in Literature: East–West Per-

spectivesEAL 360 Seminar: Topics in East Asian Languages

and LiteraturesEAS 218 Thought and Art in ChinaEAS 270 Colloquium in East Asian StudiesEAS 279 Colloquium: The Art and Culture of TibetHST 218 Thought and Art in ChinaREL 110 Politics of EnlightenmentREL 260 Buddhist ThoughtREL 263 ZenREL 265 Colloquium in East Asian ReligionsREL 266 Colloquium in Buddhist StudiesREL 270 Japanese BuddhismREL 360 Seminar: Problems in Buddhist Thought

Approved Courses in the Social Sciences

ANT 251 Women and Modernity in East AsiaANT 252 The City and the Countryside in ChinaANT 253 Introduction to East Asian Societies and

CulturesANT 342 Seminar: Topics in AnthropologyEAS 200 Colloquium: Topics in East Asian StudiesEAS 215 Pre-Modern Korean HistoryEAS 219 Modern Korean HistoryEAS 230 Women of Korea from the Three Kingdoms

to the PresentEAS 235 Colloquium: Inter-Korea Relations and

South Korean CinemaEAS 270 Colloquium in East Asian StudiesEAS 279 Colloquium: The Art and Culture of TibetEAS 375 Seminar: Japan–United States RelationsGOV 228 The Government and Politics of JapanGOV 230 The Government and Politics of ChinaGOV 251 Foreign Policy of JapanGOV 344 Seminar on Foreign Policy of the Chinese

People’s RepublicGOV 348 Seminar in International Politics: Conflict

and Cooperation in AsiaHST 101 Geisha, Wise Mothers, and Working WomenHST 211 The Emergence of ChinaHST 212 China in TransformationHST 214 Aspects of Chinese History: The World of

Thought in Early ChinaHST 217 World War II in East AsiaHST 218 Thought and Art in ChinaHST 220 Colloquium: Japan to 1600HST 221 The Rise of Modern JapanHST 222 Aspects of Japanese History: The Place of

Protest in Early Modern and Modern JapanHST 223 Women in Japanese History: From Ancient

Times to the 19th Century

The MinorThe interdepartmental minor in East Asian studies is a program of study designed to provide a coherent under-standing of and basic competence in the civilizations and societies of China, Japan and Korea. It may be undertaken in order to broaden the scope of any major;

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to acquire, for comparative purposes, an Asian perspec-tive within any of the humanistic and social-scientific disciplines; or as the basis of future graduate work and/or careers related to East Asia.

Requirements: The minor will consist of a total of six courses, no more than three of which shall be taken at other institutions. Courses taken away from Smith require the approval of the East Asian Studies Advisory Committee.

1. EAS 100 Introduction to Modern East Asia (nor-mally by the second year)

2. Five elective courses, which shall be determined in consultation with the adviser.

a. One year of an East Asian language is strongly encouraged and may constitute two elective courses. (One semester of a language may not be counted as an elective).

b. At least three elective courses may be at the 200- or 300-level

c. Courses may not be taken pass/fail.

Advisers: Marnie Anderson, Daniel K. Gardner, Peter Gregory, Marylin Rhie, Dennis Yasutomo, Suzanne Z. Gottschang, Kimberly Kono

East Asian Studies

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EconomicsVisiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term.

Professors†2 Frederick Leonard, Ph.D., ChairAndrew Zimbalist, Ph.D.**2 Randall Bartlett, Ph.D.**2 Robert Buchele, Ph.D.Roger T. Kaufman, Ph.D.Karen Pfeifer, Ph.D. Elizabeth Savoca, Ph.D.Deborah Haas-Wilson, Ph.D.†1 Charles P. Staelin, Ph.D.**1 Nola Reinhardt, Ph.D.Mahnaz Mahdavi, Ph.D.

Associate ProfessorsThomas A. Riddell, Ph.D.*1 James Miller, Ph.D., J.D.

Assistant ProfessorRoisin O’Sullivan, Ph.D.

Lecturer and Professor EmeritusMark Aldrich, Ph.D.

LecturerCharles Johnson, A.B., M.B.A.

First-year students who are considering a major in the department and who hope to spend their junior year abroad are strongly advised to take 150 and 153 in the first year and to take additional courses in econom-ics in the sophom*ore year. Majors in economics are strongly advised to take 250, 253 and 190 as soon after the introductory courses as possible. Students consider-ing graduate study in economics are advised to master the material in ECO 255 and 240 as well as MTH 111, 112, 211, 212, 225 and 243.

A. General Courses123 Cheaper by the Dozen: Twelve Economic Issues for Our TimesThis course for the concerned non-economist addresses pressing issues in contemporary U.S. and global society, including poverty and inequality, education, health-care, social security, the environment, the national debt, and global economic integration. Economic concepts presented in lay English and elementary math are used to help explain each social problem and to illuminate the core debates on appropriate solutions. May not be counted toward the major or minor in eco-nomics. Open only to junior and senior non-economics majors. {S} 4 credits.Karen PfeiferOffered Spring 2008

125 Economic Game TheoryAn examination of how rational people cooperate and compete. Game theory explores situations in which everyone’s actions affect everyone else, and everyone knows this and takes it into account when determining his or her own actions. Business, military and dating strategies will be examined. No economics prerequisite. Prerequisite: at least one semester of high school or college calculus. {S} 4 creditsJames MillerNot offered in 2007–08

150 Introductory MicroeconomicsHow and how well do markets work? What should government do in a market economy? How do mar-kets set prices, determine what will be produced and decide who will get the goods? We consider important economic issues including preserving the environment, free trade, taxation, (de)regulation, and poverty. {S} 4 creditsMembers of the departmentOffered both semesters each year

153 Introductory MacroeconomicsAn examination of current macroeconomic policy issues, including the short and long-run effects of budget deficits, the determinants of economic growth, causes and effects of inflation, and the effects of high trade deficits. The course will focus on what, if any,

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174 Economics

government (monetary and fiscal) policies should be pursued in order to achieve low inflation, full employ-ment, high economic growth and rising real wages. {S} 4 creditsMembers of the departmentOffered both semesters each year

ACC 223 Financial AccountingThe course, while using traditional accounting tech-niques and methodology, will focus on the needs of external users of financial information. The emphasis is on learning how to read, interpret and analyze fi-nancial information as a tool to guide investment deci-sions. Concepts rather than procedures are stressed and class time will be largely devoted to problem solutions and case discussions. A basic knowledge of arithmetic and a familiarity with a spreadsheet program is sug-gested. Cannot be used for credit towards the economics major and no more than four credits in accounting may be counted toward the degree. {S} 4 creditsCharles JohnsonOffered Fall 2007, Spring 2008

190 Introduction to Statistics and EconometricsSummarizing, interpreting and analyzing empirical data. Attention to descriptive statistics and statistical inference. Topics include elementary sampling, prob-ability, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing and regression. Assignments include use of statistical software and micro computers to analyze labor market and other economic data. Prerequisite: 150 and 153 recommended. {S/M} 4 creditsRobert Buchele, Elizabeth SavocaOffered both semesters each year

B. Economic Theory240 EconometricsApplied regression analysis. The specification and estimation of economic models, hypothesis testing, statistical significance, interpretation of results, policy implications. Emphasis on practical applications and cross-section data analysis. Special issues in time-series analysis. Prerequisites: 150, 153, and 190, and MTH 111. {S/M} 4 creditsRobert Buchele, Elizabeth SavocaOffered Fall 2007

250 Intermediate MicroeconomicsFocuses on the economic analysis of resource al-location in a market economy and on the economic impact of various government interventions, such as minimum wage laws, national health insurance, and environmental regulations. Covers the theories of con-sumer choice and decision making by the firm. Exam-ines the welfare implications of a market economy, and of federal and state policies which influence market choices. Prerequisite: 150, MTH 111 or its equivalent. {S} 4 creditsJames Miller, Deborah Haas-WilsonOffered both semesters each year

253 Intermediate MacroeconomicsBuilds a cohesive theoretical framework within which to analyze the workings of the macroeconomy. Current issues relating to key macroeconomic variables such as output, inflation and unemployment are examined within this framework. The role of government policy, both in the short run and the long run, is also assessed. Prerequisite: 153, MTH 111 or its equivalent. {S} 4 creditsRoger Kaufman, Roisin O’SullivanOffered both semesters each year

255 Mathematical EconomicsThe use of mathematical tools to analyze economic problems, with emphasis on linear algebra and differ-ential calculus. Applications particularly in compara-tive statics and optimization problems. Prerequisites: MTH 111, 112, 211, 212, ECO 250, and 253 or permis-sion of the instructor. {S/M} 4 creditsRoger KaufmanOffered Spring 2008

333 Seminar: Free Market EconomicsCompare and contrast the philosophical theories of justice of Robert Nozick and John Rawls. A research project involving a long paper and an oral presenta-tion concerning an issue or an area of interest to a free market economy of your choosing. Prerequisite: 233 or either 250 or 253. {S} 4 creditsFrederick LeonardOffered Fall 2007

362 Seminar: Population EconomicsTopic: The Economics of Aging. Many countries today face rapidly aging populations. The economic conse-

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175Economics

quences will pose enormous challenges to policymak-ers. What are the implications of an aging population for the sustainability of pension funds and health care systems? for labor force growth and productivity growth? for savings and asset markets? for the demand for public and private goods? What policy options have economists offered to deal with these issues? In this seminar we will study these questions and more from both microeconomic and macroeconomic perspectives. Prerequisites: ECO 250, 190. Enrollment limited to 15. {S} 4 creditsElizabeth SavocaOffered Fall 2007

363 Seminar: InequalityThe causes and consequences of income and wealth in-equality. Social class and social mobility in the United States. International comparisons. The distributional impact of technical change and globalization. Is there a “trade-off” between equality and economic growth? The benefits of competition and cooperation. Experi-mental Economics: selfishness, altruism and reciproc-ity. Fairness and the dogma of economic rationality. Does having more stuff make us happier? Prerequisites: 190, 150 and 250 (the last required for economics majors using this course to fulfill the seminar require-ment). {S} 4 creditsRobert BucheleOffered Spring 2008

C. The American Economy224 Environmental EconomicsThe causes of environmental degradation and the role that markets can play in both causing and solving pol-lution problems. The efficiency, equity, and impact on economic growth of current and proposed future envi-ronmental legislation. Prerequisite: 150. {S} 4 creditsMark AldrichOffered Spring 2008

230 Urban EconomicsEconomic analysis of the spatial structure of cities—why they are where they are and look like they do. How changes in technology and policy reshape cities over time. Selected urban problems and policies to address them, include housing, transportation, concentrations

of poverty, and financing local government. Prerequi-site: 150. {S} 4 creditsRandall BartlettOffered Spring 2008

231 The Sports EconomyThe evolution and operation of the sports industry in the United States and internationally. The course will explore the special legal and economic circ*mstances of sports leagues, owner incentives, labor markets, governance, public subsidies, and other issues. Prereq-uisite: ECO 150; ECO 190 is recommended. {S} 4 creditsAndrew ZimbalistOffered Fall 2007

233 Free Market EconomicsMeaning and nature of economic freedom; structure and institutions of a free market economy; philosophi-cal foundation underlying freedom; macro- and mi-croeconomic performance of a free market economy; foundations, performance and critique of alternatives to freedom offered by the American political left and right; analysis of economic and political issues such as the “fair” distribution of income and wealth, social security, smoking in public places and abortion, among many others. Prerequisite: 150 or 153. {S} 4 creditsFrederick LeonardOffered Spring 2008

260 Economics of the Public SectorWhat is the role of government? This course examines theoretical arguments for government intervention in the market and analyzes government expenditure programs and tax policy. Topics to be discussed include welfare reform, education, health care, social security, and tax reform. Prerequisite: 250. {S} 4 creditsTo be announcedTo be arranged

265 Economics of Corporate FinanceAn investigation of the economic foundations for investment, financing and related decisions in the business corporation. Basic concerns and responsi-bilities of the financial manager, and the methods of analysis employed by them is emphasized. This course is designed to offer a balanced discussion of practi-cal as well as theoretical developments in the field of financial economics. Prerequisites: 190, 250, MTH 111. {S} 4 creditsMahnaz MahdaviOffered Fall 2007

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275 Money and BankingAn investigation of the role of financial instruments and institutions in the economy. Major topics include the determination of interest rates, the characteristics of bonds and stocks, the structure and regulation of the banking industry, the functions of a modern central bank and the formulation and implementation of monetary policy. Prerequisite: 253. {S} 4 creditsRoisin O’SullivanTo be arranged

314 Seminar: Industrial Organization and Antitrust PolicyAn examination of the latest theories and empirical evidence about the organization of firms and indus-tries. Topics include mergers, advertising, strategic behaviors such as predatory pricing, vertical restrictions such as resale price maintenance or exclusive dealing, and antitrust laws and policies. Prerequisite: 250. {S} 4 creditsDeborah Haas-WilsonOffered Spring 2008

331 Seminar: The Economics of College Sports and Title IXThis seminar will explore the similarities and differ-ences between professional and college sports. The economic factors that condition the evolution of college sports will be examined in detail, as will the relationship between gender equity (as prescribed by Title IX) and overall intercollegiate athletic programs. Topics will include history of college sports; the role of the NCAA; efforts at reform; cross subsidization among sports; academic entrance and progress toward degree requirements; racial equity; coach compensation; pay for play; antitrust and tax treatment; commercializa-tion; financial outcomes; progress toward gender eq-uity; and efforts to impede gender equity. {S} 4 creditsAndrew ZimbalistOffered Spring 2008

341 Economics of Health CareAn examination of current economic issues in the health care industry, including the determinants of the supply of and demand for health and health care ser-vices, the growth of managed care, the implications of increasing competition in markets for physician ser-vices, hospital services and health care financing, the

challenges involved in defining and measuring health care quality, and the role of government in the health care industry. Prerequisites: 250 and 190 or permission of the instructor. {S} 4 creditsDeborah Haas-WilsonTo be arranged

D. International and Comparative Economics209 Comparative Economic SystemsMethods of comparison of economic systems and eco-nomic performance, including distributional equity as well as allocative efficiency and economic growth. Reviews of theories and history of Western capitalist development and of socialist development. The Soviet system in Russia and Eastern Europe, early reform programs there, the demise of this system, and cur-rent issues regarding the transition from Soviet-type to market economies. Comparative study of other regions, including China and East Asian economies, in the context of the debate over globalization and global economic justice. Prerequisite: Either 150 or 153. {S} 4 creditsKaren PfeiferTo be arranged

211 Economic DevelopmentAn overview of economic development theory and practice since the 1950s. Why have global economic inequalities widened? What economic policies have been implemented in the developing countries of Asia, Latin America, Africa and the Middle East in search of economic development, what theories underlie these policies, and what have been the consequences for economic welfare the these regions? Topics include trade policy (protectionism versus free trade), financial policy, industrial development strategies, formal and informal sector employment, women in development, international financial issues (lending, balance of payments deficits, the debt and financial crises), struc-tural adjustment policies and the new globalization of production and finance. Prerequisites: 150 and 153. {S} 4 creditsNola Reinhardt Offered Fall 2007

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213 The World Food SystemExamination of changing international patterns of food production and distribution to shed light on the paradox of world hunger in the face of global food abundance. Explores the rise of modern agriculture and its advantages and disadvantages compared to traditional farming methods. Considers the transfor-mation of third-world agriculture in the context of increasing concentration in agricultural production and marketing, the debate over food aid, technology transfer to developing countries, GATT/WTO agricultur-al agreements, and structural adjustment/globalization policies. Prerequisite: 150. {S} 4 creditsNola ReinhardtTo be arranged

214 Economics of the Middle East and North AfricaAn economic survey of the MENA region, applying development concepts such as the “rentier state,” the “watchmaker” economy, export-led growth and import-substitution industrialization. Examples from countries across the region illustrate the themes of interaction with Western capitalism and the global economy and variations among patterns of economic transformation and growth. Topics include the impor-tance of oil and capital flows, industrial and agrarian trends, the economic role of government, employment and the export of labor, human development, the Euro-Mediterranean and Gulf Cooperation Council initia-tives, and the impact of Islamism. Prerequisite: either ECO 150 or 153. {S} 4 creditsKaren PfeiferOffered Fall 2007

226 Economics of European IntegrationWhy would countries give up their own currencies to adopt a common new one? Why can citizens of Belgium simply move to France without any special formalities? This course will investigate such questions by analyzing the ongoing integration of European countries from an economic perspective. While the major focus will be on the economics of integration, account will be taken of the historical, political and cultural context in which this process occurred. Major topics include the origins, institutions and policies of the European Union, the integration of markets for labor, capital and goods and monetary integration. Prerequisites: ECO 150 and 153. {S} 4 creditsRoisin O’SullivanOffered Fall 2007

295 International Trade and Commercial PolicyAn examination of the trading relationships among countries and of the flow of production factors throughout the world economy. Topics include the theories of international trade, issues of commercial policy and the rise of protectionism, multilateral trade negotiations, preferential trade agreements, the impact of multinational firms, and trade and economic devel-opment. Prerequisite: 250. {S} 4 creditsTo be arranged

296 International FinanceAn examination of international monetary theory and institutions and their relevance to national and inter-national economic policy. Topics include mechanisms of adjustment in the balance of payments; macro-economic and exchange-rate policy for internal and external balance; international movements of capital; and the history of the international monetary system: its past crises and current prospects; issues of currency union and optimal currency area; and emerging mar-kets. Prerequisite: 253. {S} 4 creditsMahnaz MahdaviOffered Spring 2008

310 Seminar: Comparative Labor EconomicsTopic: Labor Economics and Compensation Systems. Why do lawyers and doctors make so much more than college professors? Are corporate executives paid too much or too little? How much of the male-female wage gap is due to discrimination? Is education an investment in human capital, a signal, or a means of reproducing the class structure? How has trade with de-veloping countries affected wages in the United States? In this seminar we shall apply and extend economic theory to analyze these and other questions in labor economics. Prerequisites: Eco 250, 190, and MTH 111 (calculus). {S} 4 creditsRoger KaufmanTo be arranged

318 Seminar: Latin American EconomiesThe Latin American economies have undergone a dra-matic process of economic collapse and restructuring since 1980. We examine the background to the collapse and the economic reforms implemented in response. We consider the current status and future prospects of the region’s economies. Prerequisites: 211, and 250 or 253, or permission of the instructor. {S} 4 creditsNola ReinhardtTo be arranged

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375 Seminar: The Theory and Practice of Central BankingWhat role do central banks play in the management of short-run economic fluctuations? What has driven the recent global trend towards more powerful and inde-pendent central-banking institutions? This course will explore the theoretical foundations that link central bank policy to real economic activity. Building on this theoretical background, the monetary policy frame-works and operating procedures of key central banks will then be examined. Much of the analysis will focus on the current practices of the US Federal Reserve and the European Central Bank, with a view to identifying the relative strengths and weaknesses of the two institu-tions. Prerequisite: ECO 253. {S} 4 creditsRoisin O’SullivanOffered Fall 2007

404 Special StudiesAdmission by permission of the department, normally for majors who have had four semester courses in eco-nomics above the introductory level. 4 creditsOffered both semesters each year

408d Special StudiesAdmission by permission of the department, normally for majors and minors who have had four semester courses in economics above the introductory level. Students contemplating a special studies should read the guidelines for special studies in the department’s “Handbook for Prospective Majors” on the depart-ment’s Web page: www.smith.edu/economics.8 creditsFull-year course; Offered each year

The MajorAdvisers: Randall Bartlett, Robert Buchele, Deborah Haas-Wilson, Roger Kaufman, Frederick Leonard, Mahnaz Mahdavi, James Miller, Roisin O’Sullivan, Karen Pfeifer, Nola Reinhardt, Thomas Riddell, Eliza-beth Savoca, Charles Staelin, Andrew Zimbalist

Adviser for Study Abroad: Karen Pfeifer

Basis: 150 and 153.

Requirements: ECO 150 and 153 or their equivalent, ECO 190 (or MTH 245 and MTH 247 taken together), ECO 250, ECO 253, and five other courses in econom-ics. One of these five must be a 300-level course (or honors thesis) taken at Smith that includes an eco-nomics research paper and an oral presentation. MTH 111 or its equivalent is a prerequisite for ECO 250 and ECO 253. A student who passes the economics placement exam for ECO 150 or ECO 153, or who passes the AP examination in Microeconomics or Macroeconomics with a score of 4 or 5, may count this as the equivalent of ECO 150 or ECO 153, with course credit toward the major in economics. Students with AP or IB credit are urged to take the placement exams to ensure correct placement. Economics credit will be given for public policy courses when taught by a member of the economics department. The S/U grading option is not allowed for courses counting toward the economics major. An exception may be made in the case of 150 and 153. Majors may spend the junior year abroad if they meet the college’s requirements. Majors may participate in the Washington Eco-nomic Policy semester at American University. See Thomas Riddell for more information. Majors may also participate in the Semester-in-Washington Program and the Washington Summer Internship Program administered by the Department of Government and described under the government major.

The MinorAdvisers: Same as for the major

Requirements: Six courses in economics, consisting of 150, 153, 190, and three other courses in economics; or 150, 153, a statistics course taken outside of the depart-ment, and four other courses in economics. Crediting procedures are the same as for the major.

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HonorsDirector: Robert Buchele

430d Thesis8 creditsFull-year course; Offered each year

431 Thesis8 creditsOffered Fall 2007

Requirements: A thesis and 8 semester courses includ-ing 150, 153, 190, 250, 253, and three other economics courses.

Students may elect either a yearlong thesis course (430d) or a fall semester course (431). The thesis for the yearlong course must be submitted to the director by April 15. The thesis for the one-semester course must be submitted by the first day of classes of the following semester.

Examination: Honors students must take an oral ex-amination on the material in their theses.

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Education and Child Study

ProfessorsAlan L. Marvelli, Ed.D.†1 Sue J. M. Freeman, Ph.D.Alan N. Rudnitsky, Ph.D., Chair**1 Rosetta Marantz Cohen, Ed.D.

Associate Professors†1 Susan M. Etheredge, Ed.D.Sam Intrator, Ph.D.

Assistant ProfessorLucy Mule, Ph.D.

LecturersCathy Hofer Reid, Ph.D.Cathy Weisman Topal, M.A.T.Janice Gatty, Ed.D.†1 Glenn Ellis, Ph.D.Carol B. Berner, M.S.Ed.

Tutor SupervisorMarilyn London, M.A.

Teaching FellowsBrigid D. Franey, B.A.

Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term.

Students who, irrespective of major, desire to comply with the varying requirements of different states for licensure to teach in public schools are urged to consult the department as early as possible during their college careers.

340 Historical and Philosophical Perspectives and the Educative ProcessA colloquium integrating foundations, the learning process and curriculum. Open only to senior majors. {S} 4 creditsTo be announcedOffered Spring 2008

Historical and Philosophical Foundations110 Introduction to American EducationThis course is an introduction to educational founda-tions. This course is designed to introduce you to the basic structure, function, and history of American education, and to give you perspective on important contemporary issues in the field. Includes directed observation in school settings. Not open to students

who have had two or more courses in the department. Enrollment limited to 35. {S} 4 creditsLucy MuleOffered Fall 2007

342 Growing Up American: Adolescents and Their Educational InstitutionsThe institutional educational contexts through which our adolescents move can powerfully influence the growth and development of our youth. Using a cross-disciplinary approach, this course will examine those educational institutions central to adolescent life: schools, classrooms, school extracurriculars, arts-based organizations, athletic programs, community youth organizations, faith-based organizations and cyber-communities. Three issues will be investigated: What theoretical and sociocultural perspectives shape these educational institutions? How do these institutions serve or fail the diverse needs of American youth? How and under what conditions do these educational insti-tutions matter to youth? This course includes a service- learning commitment and several evening movie slots. Enrollment limited to 35. {S} 4 creditsSam IntratorOffered Spring 2008

Benjamin Gundersheimer, B.A.Heather L. Heyes, B.A.Karen E. Penda, A.B.Molly R. Treadway, A.B.Roberto Vicente, B.A.

Advisory CommitteeGwen Agna, M.Ed.Carol Gregory, M.A.Johanna M. McKenna, M.A.Suzanne Scallion, M.Ed.Beth Singer, Ed.D.

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552 Perspectives on American EducationRequired of all candidates for the M.A., the Ed.M. and the M.A.T. degrees. 4 creditsRosetta CohenOffered Fall 2007

Sociological and Cultural Foundations200 Education in the CityThe course explores how the challenges facing schools in America’s cities are entwined with social, economic and political conditions present within the urban envi-ronment. Our essential question asks how have urban educators and policy makers attempted to provide a quality educational experience for youth when issues associated with their social environment often present significant obstacles to teaching and learning? Us-ing relevant social theory to guide our analyses, we’ll investigate school reform efforts at the macro-level by looking at policy-driven initiatives such as high stakes testing, vouchers and privatization and at the local level by exploring the work of teachers, parents, youth workers and reformers. There will be fieldwork opportu-nities available for students. Enrollment limited to 35. {S} 4 creditsSam IntratorOffered Fall 2007

210 Literacy in Cross-Cultural PerspectiveThis course will address issues in literacy and literacy education among special populations, specifically culturally and linguistically diverse learners. We will closely examine the multiple contexts for literacy edu-cation including school, home and community. Special topics include: A sociocultural theory of literacy and literacy education; role of language in literacy educa-tion; role of culture in literacy and learning; literacy instruction in multilingual/multicultural classroom contexts; language, culture and the politics of school-ing; and critical literacy in school and community. This course has a field component. Enrollment limited to 35. {S} 4 creditsLucy MuleOffered Spring 2008

232 The American Middle School and High SchoolA study of the American secondary and middle school as a changing social institution. An analysis of the

history and sociology of this institution, modern school reform, curriculum development, and contemporary problems of secondary education. Directed classroom observation. Not open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 35. {S} 4 creditsRosetta CohenOffered Fall 2007

237 Comparative EducationThis course will look at education from a comparative perspective, using mainly the cultural approach to examine educational systems and practices in various parts of the world including Asia, Africa, Europe and the United States. We will recognize schools as cul-tural sites and explore how schools and education are researched using ethnographic methodology and an-thropological theory. We will take a comparative look at how some cultural processes occur in the hidden cur-riculum, classroom practices, institutional processes, language and communication, and power relations in schools as well as the effect of schools on students and teachers’ cultures. {S} 4 creditsLucy MuleOffered Fall 2007

343 Multicultural EducationAn examination of the multicultural approach, its roots in social protest movements and role in educational reform. The course aims to develop an understanding of the key concepts, developments and controversies in the field of multicultural education; cultivate sensitivity to the experiences of diverse people in American society; explore alternative approaches for working with diverse students and their families; and develop a sound philo-sophical and pedagogical rationale for a multicultural education. Enrollment limited to 35. {S} 4 creditsLucy MuleOffered Spring 2008

Learners and the Learning ProcessPHI 210 Issues in Recent and Contemporary PhilosophyPending CAP ApprovalTopic: Philosophy and Children. Influenced by devel-opmental psychology, we tend to think of children as progressing toward adulthood in distinct stages that make no room for philosophy. Yet children can be creative philosophers. Engaging with them philosophi-

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182 Education and Child Study

cally can help us get beyond the “deficit conception” of childhood. {S} 4 creditsGareth MatthewsOffered Spring 2008

235 Child and Adolescent Growth and DevelopmentA study of theories of growth and development of chil-dren from prenatal development through adolescence; basic considerations of theoretical application to the educative process and child study. Directed observations in a variety of child-care and educational settings. Enrollment limited to 55. {S} 4 creditsJanice GattyOffered Fall 2007, Spring 2008

238 Educational PsychologyThis course combines perspectives on cognition and learning to examine the teaching-learning process in educational settings. In addition to cognitive factors the course will incorporate contextual factors such as classroom structure, teacher belief systems, peer rela-tionships and educational policy. Consideration of the teaching-learning process will highlight subject matter instruction and assessment. Prerequisite: a genuine interest in better understanding teaching and learning. Priority given to majors, minors, first-year and second-year students. Enrollment limited to 55. {S/N} 4 creditsAlan RudnitskyOffered Fall 2007

249 Children With Hearing LossEducational, social, scientific and diagnostic consider-ation. Examination of various causes and treatments of hearing losses; historical and contemporary issues in the education of deaf children. {S} 4 creditsAlan MarvelliOffered Spring 2008

548 Student Diversity and Classroom TeachingAn examination of diversity in learning and back-ground variables, and their consideration in promoting educational equity. Also, special needs as factors in classroom teaching and student learning. Research and pre-practicum required. {S} 4 creditsTo be announcedOffered Spring 2008

554 Cognition and Instructional DesignA course focusing on the latest developments in cogni-tive science and the potential impact of these develop-

ments on classroom instruction. Open to seniors by permission of the instructor. 4 creditsAlan RudnitskyOffered Fall 2007

Curriculum and InstructionESS 225 Education Through the Physical: Youth SportsThis course is designed to explore how youth sports impacts the health, education and well-being of chil-dren. Class components will include an examination of youth sport philosophies, literature on cognitive and physical growth, approaches to coach and parent education, and an assessment of school and com-munity-based programs. Students will be required to observe, analyze and report on a local children’s sports program. {S} 4 creditsDonald SiegelOffered Spring 2008

231 Foundations and Issues of Early Childhood EducationThe purpose of this course is to explore and examine the basic principles and curricular and instructional practices in early childhood education. Students begin this examination by taking a close look at the young child through readings and discussion, classroom observations and field-based experiences in an early childhood setting. The course also traces the historical and intellectual roots of early childhood education. This will lead students to consider, compare and con-trast a variety of programs and models in early child-hood education. {S} 4 creditsSusan EtheredgeOffered Fall 2009

305 The Teaching of Visual Art in the ClassroomWe live in a visual culture and children are visual learners. The visual arts offer teachers a powerful means of making learning concrete, visible and exciting. In this class, students explore multiple teach-ing/learning strategies as they experience and analyze methods and materials for teaching visual arts and art appreciation. The class is designed for education majors seeking experience in and understanding of the visual arts. Studio work is part of each class. Since a practicum involving classroom teaching is required, this class works well for students who will be student teaching. Students who are not student teaching can

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183Education and Child Study

expect to spend an additional hour each week working in an art class. Admission by permission of the instruc-tor. {S/A} 4 creditsCathy TopalOffered Fall 2007

325 Teaching the Imaginative—Writing and Art in the ClassroomFor some, the purpose of education is the creation of artists. Children should become skilled at securing meaning from multiple forms of expression such as text, poetry, visual art, and other forms of representa-tion. This course explores the relationship between writing process, imagination and aesthetic process by engaging students in a full-semester service learn-ing experience with children from local schools and youth organizations. The seminar will explore theories explaining imagination and aesthetic thought and how these capacities can be cultivated in educational settings. Seminar participants will teach a weekly work-shop to local youth at the Smith College Museum of Art. {S} 4 creditsSam IntratorOffered Spring 2008

334 Creating and Analyzing Case Studies of TeachingThe strategic knowledge teachers use to inform in-structional decision-making is tightly woven to the context of the teaching and rarely able to be stated as a set of rules or propositions. Case studies have become a powerful methodology for studying teaching. In this course, students will create and present a case study of a teaching episode. The case will include a video, teacher commentary, evidence from students and theo-retical analysis. All of these elements will work together to explicate the strategic knowledge underlying the teaching. Each semester a theme providing the theo-retical focus will be selected. Prerequisite: EDC 238 and one additional course in Education and Child Study. Permission of the instructor is required. Enrollment limited to 12. {S} 4 creditsAl RudnitskyOffered Spring 2008

336 Seminar in American EducationTopic: Urban Youth Development. Designed for students who aspire to study social and educational programs devoted to serving youth. We will examine theories that explain the factors that perpetuate the achievement gap and explore programs developed to redress these inequalities. Special attention will be paid

to exploring methods of research and evaluation of youth programs. Students will identify a project related to Project Coach—a coaching education that prepares adolescents from Springfield and Holyoke to coach and run youth sports at a boys and girls club and at a public school during the after school hours (or identity their own project site to study). 4 creditsSam Intrator and Donald SiegelOffered Fall 2007

338 Children Learning to ReadThis course examines teaching and learning issues related to the reading process in the elementary class-room. Students develop a theoretical knowledge base for the teaching of reading to guide their instructional decisions and practices in the classroom setting. Under-standing what constitutes a balanced reading program for all children is a goal of the course. Students spend an additional hour each week engaged in classroom observations, study group discussions and field-based experiences. Prerequisite: EDC 238. Open to juniors and seniors only with permission. {S} 4 creditsCarol BernerOffered Spring 2008

345d Elementary Curriculum and MethodsA study of the curriculum and the application of the principles of teaching in the elementary school. Two class hours and a practicum involving directed classroom teaching. Prerequisite: three courses in the department taken previously, including 235 and 238, grade of B- or better in education courses. Admission by permission of the department. Preregistration meeting scheduled in April. {S} 12 creditsCathy Swift (Fall), Alan Rudnitsky (Spring)Full-year course; Offered each year

346 Clinical Internship in TeachingFull-time practicum in middle and high schools. Re-quired prerequisite: EDC 232. Open to seniors only. {S} 8 creditsOffered Fall 2007

347 Individual Differences Among LearnersExamination of research on individual differences and their consideration in the teaching-learning process. Research and pre-practicum required. Prerequisites: 235 or 342 and 238 and permission of the instructor. {S} 4 creditsTo be announcedOffered Spring 2008

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184 Education and Child Study

352 Methods of InstructionExamining subject matter from the standpoint of pedagogical content knowledge. The course includes methods of planning, teaching and assessment ap-propriate to the grade level and subject matter area. Content frameworks and standards serve as the orga-nizing themes for the course. This course is designed for students who are planning to teach in the middle or high school. The specific subject matter sections of this course offered in a particular semester depend upon the level and subject matter of students in the educator preparation program. 4 creditsCarol BernerOffered Fall 2007

390 Colloquium: Teaching Science, Engineering and TechnologyBreakthroughs in science, technology and engineering are occurring at an astounding rate. This course will focus on providing you with the skills and knowledge needed to bring this excitement into the classroom. We will explore theories on student learning and curriculum design, investigate teaching strategies through hands-on activities and discuss current issues. Although the focus of the course is to prepare middle and secondary school teachers, other participants are welcome: the ideas we will examine will help develop communication and learning skills that can prepare you for a variety of careers. Not open to first-year stu-dents. Enrollment limited to 20. {S} 4 creditsGlenn EllisOffered Fall 2008

HST 390 Teaching HistoryA consideration of how the study of history, broadly conceived, gets translated into curriculum for middle and secondary schools. Addressing a range of topics in American history, students will develop lesson and unit plans using primary and secondary resources, films, videos and internet materials. Discussions will focus on both the historical content and on the pedagogy used to teach it. For upper-level undergraduate and gradu-ate students who have an interest in teaching. Does not count for seminar credit in the history major. {H} 4 creditsPeter GunnOffered Fall 2007

ENG 399 Teaching LiteratureDiscussion of poetry, short stories, short novels, essays and drama with particular emphasis on the ways in which one might teach them. Consideration of the uses of writing and the leading of discussion classes. For upper-level undergraduate and graduate students who have an interest in teaching. {L} 4 creditsSamuel ScheerOffered Fall 2007

Smith College and Clarke School for the Deaf Graduate Teacher Education Program

Foundations of Education of the Deaf564 Perspectives on the Education, Guidance and Culture of the DeafHistory of the education of the deaf. Educational, vo-cational and social issues affecting deaf children and adults in our society. 2 creditsAlan MarvelliOffered Fall 2007

568 Psychology of Exceptional ChildrenGrowth and development of children, significance of early experiences. Personality development and its rela-tion to problems of formal learning for both hearing children and the deaf and hard of hearing. 2 creditsTo be announcedOffered Spring 2008

Speech Science and Audiology565 Hearing, Speech and Deafness4 credits

Part I. Nature of SoundAnatomy and physiology of hearing. Processes of audi-tory perception. Anatomy, physiology and acoustics of speech. Types, causes and consequences of hearing im-pairment. Characteristics of the speech of deaf children.

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185Education and Child Study

Part II. Nature of CommunicationSpeech as a code for language. Speech perception and the effects of sensorineural hearing loss. Auditory train-ing and lip-reading instruction. Use of hearing in the development of speech-production skills. 4 creditsHollis AltmanOffered Summer 2007

566 Audiometry, Hearing Aids and Auditory LearningSound perception in hearing, hard of hearing and deaf individuals. Methods and equipment for testing and developing sound perception skills. 2 creditsHollis AltmanOffered Fall 2007

573 Audiometry, Acoustics and the Role of the TeacherA. Auditory feedback loop, from speech production to perception. B. Cochlear Implants: Introduction—His-tory of cochlear implant development. Biological implications. Candidacy. Ethical issues. Surgical preparation. Hardware, programming, troubleshoot-ing. Habilitation and classroom application—signal processing, speech perception, speech production, language, evaluation. C. Communication Access Assis-tive Devices. D. Audiograms, amplification, classroom acoustics, IEP’s—putting it all together. Prerequisites: EDC 565 and 566. Limited to candidates for the M.E.D. degree. (E) 2 creditsHollis Altman, Danial SalvucciOffered Spring 2008

Language and Communication561 Developing Auditory/Oral Communications in Deaf ChildrenA detailed analysis of speech production covering phonetic transcription and developing and improv-ing speech readiness, voice quality, speech breathing, articulation, rhythm, phrasing, accent and fluency. Demonstration plus extensive speech lab and classroom teaching experiences. 6 creditsAllison HolmbergFull-year course, Offered both semesters

562 Developing Language Skills in Deaf ChildrenPrinciples and techniques used in development of language with deaf children. Study of linguistics and psycholinguistics. Consideration is given to traditional

and modern approaches to language development. 4 creditsJoyce Fitzroy and Linda FindlayFull-year course, Offered both semesters

567 English Language Acquisition and DeafnessA psycholinguistic account of English language acqui-sition of hearing and deaf children. Both theory and empirical research are stressed, and links are made to contemporary developments in language assessment and intervention. 4 creditsPeter A. de VilliersOffered Fall 2007

Curriculum and Instruction563 Elementary School Curriculum, Methods and Media for the DeafPrinciples and methods of the teaching of reading; classroom procedures for the presentation of other school subjects. Uses of texts and reference materials, plus summer sessions devoted to media development and utilization, microcomputer operations and word processing. 4 creditsMembers of the facultyFull-year course, Offered both semesters

Student Teaching569 Observation and Student TeachingA minimum of 400 hours of observation and student teaching of deaf children in educational levels from preschool through eighth grade, in self-contained resi-dential and day settings, plus integrated day classes.8 creditsMembers of the facultyFull-year course, Offered both semesters

Education of the Deaf Electives571 Introduction to Signing and Deaf CultureDevelopment of basic receptive and expressive skills in American Sign Language and fingerspelling. Consid-erations of issues related to deafness and deaf culture. Participation in activities of the deaf community. 4 creditsRuth P. MooreOffered Spring 2008

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186 Education and Child Study

572 The Deaf Child: 0–5 YearsThe effects of deafness on the development of children and their families during the first five years of life. Topics such as auditory, cognitive, language, speech, social and emotional development in deaf infants and young children are discussed. Parent counseling issues such as emotional reactions to deafness, interpretation of test results and making educational choices are also presented. 4 creditsJanice GattyOffered Spring 2008

Special Studies400 Special Studies1 to 4 creditsOffered both semesters each year

The MajorRequirements: 10 semester courses selected in consul-tation with the major adviser: usually these will consist of one course in the Historical and Philosophical Foun-dations; one course in the Sociological and Cultural Foundations; two courses in The Learning Process; one course in Curriculum and Instruction; EDC 345d; two additional courses, one of which must be an advanced course; EDC 340 taken during the senior year. The fol-lowing courses, when applied toward the major, cannot be taken with the S/U option: 235, 238, 342, 345, 346, 340. Students may elect to major without preparing to teach by fulfilling an alternative course of study devel-oped in consultation with the major adviser and with approval of the department.

Advisers: Members of the department

Adviser for Study Abroad: Lucy Mule

Director of Teacher Education: Alan Rudnitsky

Teacher/Lecturers–Elementary ProgramTiphareth Ananda, Ed.M.Margot R. Bittell, M.S.Ed.Penny Block, Ed.M.Gina Bordoni-Cowley, M.Ed.

Elizabeth Cooney, A.B.Katherine First, M.Ed.Elisabeth Grams Haxby, Ed.M.Janice Henderson, Ed.M.Roberta E. Murphy, M.Ed.Lara Ramsey, Ed.D.Janice Marie Szmaszek, Ed.M.Gary A. Thayer, B.A.Barry J. Wadsworth, Jr./M.A.T.Thomas M. Weiner, M.Ed.

The MinorRequired courses: EDC 235, Child and Adolescent Growth and Development; EDC 238, Educational Psychology.

Areas of concentration: four courses from an area of concentration. Courses accompanied by an (e) on the following list are electives. The specific courses taken by a student are worked out with a faculty adviser.

a. Special NeedsAdviser: Sue Freeman

EDC 239 Counseling Theory and Education (e)EDC 248 Individuals with DisabilitiesEDC 249 Children With Hearing Loss (e)EDC 347 Individual Differences Among Learners (e)EDC 350 Learning Disabilities (e)

b. Child Development/Early Childhood

Adviser: Janice Gatty

EDC 231 Foundations and Issues of Early Childhood EducationEDC 341 The Child in Modern Society (e)EDC 345d Elementary Curriculum and Methods (e)EDC 347 Individual Differences Among Learners (e)

c. Learning and InstructionAdvisers: Sam Intrator, Rosetta Cohen, Al Rudnitsky

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187Education and Child Study

EDC 232 The American Middle School and High School (e)EDC 333 Information Technology and Learning (e)EDC 338 Children Learning to Read (e)EDC 343 Multicultural Education (e)EDC 345d Elementary Curriculum and Methods (e)EDC 356 Curriculum Principles and Design (e)EDC 540 Critical Thinking and Research in Education (e)EDC 554 Cognition and Instruction (e)

d. Middle School or High SchoolAdvisers: Rosetta Cohen, Sam Intrator, Lucy Mule

EDC 232 The American Middle School and High SchoolEDC 342 Growing Up AmericanEDC 346 Clinical Internship in TeachingEDC 347 Individual Differences Among Learners e)EDC 352 Methods of Instruction

One course from Historical and Philosophical Foundations or Sociological and Cultural Foundations

e. Education StudiesAdvisers: Sam Intrator, Lucy Mule

This minor does not require EDC 235 and EDC 238.

Six courses from:EDC 200 Education in the CityEDC 210 Literacy in Cross-Cultural Perspective (e)EDC 222 Philosophy of EducationEDC 232 The American Middle School and High SchoolEDC 234 Modern Problems of EducationEDC 236 American EducationEDC 237 Comparative EducationEDC 336 Seminar in American EducationEDC 342 Growing Up AmericanEDC 343 Multicultural Education (e)

Student-Initiated MinorRequirement: The approval of a faculty adviser, and permission from the members of the department in the form of a majority vote.

HonorsDirector: To be announced

431 Thesis8 creditsOffered first semester each year

432d Thesis12 creditsFull-year course; Offered each year

Requirements: those listed in the major; thesis (431, 432d) pursued either in the first semester of or throughout the senior year.

An examination in the candidate’s area of concentra-tion.

GraduateAdvisers: Members of the department

510 Human Development and Education

540 Critical Thinking and Research in Education

552 Perspectives on American Education

554 Cognition and Instruction

548 Student Diversity and Classroom Teaching

559 Clinical Internship in Teaching4 creditsOffered both semesters each year

567 English Language Acquisition and Deafness

580 Advanced StudiesOpen to seniors by permission of the department.4 creditsMembers of the department

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188 Education and Child Study

Requirements for Programs Leading to Educator LicensureSmith College offers programs of study in which stu-dents may obtain a license enabling them to become public school teachers. Programs of study include the following fields and levels:

Elementary 1–6 Baccalaureate and Post-BaccalaureateMiddle School Baccalaureate and Post-Baccalaureate Integrated English/History Integrated Science/MathematicsVisual Art PreK–8 BaccalaureateSubject Matter Educator Baccalaureate and Post-Bac-calaureate Biology 5–8, 8–12 Chemistry 5–8, 8–12 Earth Science 5–8, 8–12 English 5–8, 8–12 History 5–8, 8–12 Foreign Language 5–12 French Foreign Language 5–12 Spanish Mathematics 5–8, 8–12 Physics 5–8, 8–12 Political Science 5–8, 8–12Subject Matter Educator Baccalaureate Technology/Engineering 5–12Post-Baccalaureate Teacher of the Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Pre-K–8

All students seeking Educator Licensure must have a major in the liberal arts and sciences. Students must also meet specific requirements including subject matter appropriate for the teaching field and level, knowledge of teaching, pre-practicum fieldwork and a practicum experience. All students seeking Educator Licensure must take and pass the Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure (MTEL). Smith College’s pass rate for 2006 was 95 percent. Students interested in obtaining Educator Licensure and in preparing to teach should contact a member of the Department of Education and Child Study as early in their Smith career as possible. Students can obtain a copy of the program requirements for all fields and levels of licensure at the department office in Morgan Hall.

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189

EngineeringVisiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term.

Director, Picker Engineering ProgramLinda E. Jones, Ph.D., Rosemary Bradford Hewlett ’40

Professor, Chair

Director of the Design Clinic and LecturerSusannah Howe, Ph.D.

Professor†2 Ruth Haas, Ph.D. (Mathematics and Statistics and Engineering)

Associate ProfessorsBorjana Mikic, Ph.D.†1 Glenn Ellis, Ph.D.Susan Voss, Ph.D.Andrew Guswa, Ph.D.Donna Riley, Ph.D.

Assistant ProfessorsJudith Cardell, Ph.D., Clare Booth Luce Assistant Professor of Computer EngineeringPaul Voss, Ph.D.

A liberal arts education involves the acquisition of general knowledge to develop the ability for reasoned judgment and to prepare graduates to live full and rewarding lives. In a technologically rich era, engineer-ing must become an integral part of the liberal arts environment. Engineering, often referred to as the application of scientific and mathematical principles in the service of humanity, is the bridge that connects the basic sciences and mathematics to the humanities and social sciences. Students who major in engineering receive a Bach-elor of Science degree, which focuses on the fundamen-tals of all the engineering disciplines. With rigorous study in three basic areas—mechanics, electrical systems and thermochemical processes—students learn to structure engineering solutions to a variety of problems using first principles. Before graduation, all students majoring in engi-neering are strongly encouraged to take the Funda-mentals of Engineering Exam (the “FE”) distributed by the national council of Examiners in Engineering and Surveying.

100 Engineering for EveryoneEGR 100 serves as an accessible course for all students, regardless of background or intent to major in engi-neering. Engineering majors are required to take EGR

100 for the major, however. Those students considering majoring in engineering are strongly encouraged to take EGR 100 in the fall semester. This course is an introduction to engineering practice through partici-pation in a semester-long team-based design project. Students will develop a sound understanding of the en-gineering design process, including problem definition, background research identification of design criteria, development of metrics and methods for evaluating alternative designs, prototype development and proof of concept testing. Working in teams, students will present their ideas frequently through oral and written reports. Reading assignments and in-class discussions will challenge students to critically analyze contemporary issues related to the interaction of technology andsociety. {N} 4 creditsJudith Cardell, Paul Voss, Fall 2007Linda E. Jones, Spring 2008Offered Fall 2007, Spring 2008

101 Structures and the Built EnvironmentThis course, designed for a general audience, examines the development of large structures (towers, bridges, domes) throughout history with emphasis on the past 200 years. Following the evolution of ideas and materials, it introduces students to the interpretation of significant works from scientific, social and symbolic

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perspectives. Examples include the Brooklyn Bridge, the Eiffel Tower and the Big Dig. {N} 4 creditsAndrew GuswaNot offered in 2007–08

201/PHY 210 Mathematical Methods of Physical Sciences and Engineering IChoosing and using mathematical tools to solve problems in physical sciences. Topics include complex numbers, multiple integrals, vector analysis, Fourier series, ordinary differential equations, calculus of variations. Prerequisites: MTH 111 and 112 or the equivalent. Enrollment limited to 20. {N/M} 4 creditsMalgorzata Zielinska-PfabéOffered every Fall

202/PHY 211 Mathematical Methods of Physical Sciences and Engineering IIMathematical tools to solve advanced problems in physical sciences. Topics include special functions, orthogonal functions, partial differential equations, functions of complex variables, integral transforms. Prerequisites: 210 or MTH 111, 112, 211 and 212 or permission of the instructor. {N/M} 4 creditsMalgorzata Zielinska-PfabéOffered every Spring

MTH 204 Differential Equations and Numerical Methods in EngineeringAn introduction to the computational tools used to solve mathematical and engineering problems such as error analysis, root finding, linear equations, opti-mization, ordinary and partial differential equations. Prerequisites: CSC 111, MTH 112 or MTH 114 or per-mission of the instructor. {M} 4 creditsPau Atela, Christophe GoléOffered every Spring

220 Engineering Circuit TheoryAnalog and digital circuits are the building blocks of computers, medical technologies and all things elec-trical. This course introduces both the fundamental principles necessary to understand how circuits work and mathematical tools that have widespread applica-tions in areas throughout engineering and science. Topics include: Kirchhoff’s laws, Thévenin and Norton equivalents, superposition, responses of first-order and second-order networks, time-domain and frequency-domain analyses, frequency-selective networks. Pre-

requisites (or corequisites): PHY 118 and PHY 210 (or equivalents) or permission of the instructor. {N} 4 creditsSusan Voss and Judith CardellOffered every Fall

MTH 241 Probability and Statistics for EngineersThis course gives students a working knowledge of basic probability and statistics and their application to engineering. Analysis of data and simulation using computer software, are emphasized. Topics include random variables, probability distributions, expecta-tion, estimation, testing, experimental design, quality control and multiple regression. Limited to 25 students. Prerequisites: PHY 210 or MTH 212 as well as CSC 111 (may be taken concurrently) Students will not be given credit for both MTH 241 and MTH 245 or MTH 190. {M} Nicholas Horton, Katherine HalvorsenOffered Spring 2008 and each Fall thereafter

250/CSC 231 Microprocessors and Assembly LanguageAn introduction to the architecture of the Intel Pentium class processor and its assembly language in the Linux environment. Students write programs in assembly and explore the architectural features of the Pentium, including its use of the memory, the data formats used to represent information, the implementation of high-level language constructs, integer and floating-point arithmetic, and how the processor deals with I/O devices and interrupts. Prerequisite: 112 or permission of the instructor. {M} 4 creditsDominique ThiébautOffered every Fall

251/CSC 270 Digital Circuits and Computer SystemsThis class introduces the operation of logic and sequen-tial circuits. Students explore basic logic gates (and, or, nand, nor), counters, flip-flops, decoders, microproces-sor systems. Students have the opportunity to design and implement digital circuits during a weekly lab. Prerequisite: 231. Enrollment limited to 12. {M} 4 creditsDominique ThiébautOffered Spring 2008

260 Mass & Energy BalancesThis course provides an introduction to fundamental principles that govern the design and analysis of chem-ical processes. The conversion of mass and energy will

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serve as the basis for the analysis of steady-state and transient behavior of reactive and non-reactive systems. Specific topics covered will include a review of basic thermodynamics, behavior of ideal and real gases, phase equilibria, and an application of these principles to the concept of industrial ecology. Prerequisites: MTH 112, CHM 111. {N} 4 creditsDonna RileyOffered every Spring

270 Continuum Mechanics IThis is the first course in a two-semester sequence de-signed to introduce students to fundamental theoretical principles and analysis of mechanics of continuous media, including solids and fluids. Concepts and topics to be covered in this course include conservation laws, static and dynamic behavior of rigid bodies, analysis of machines and frames, internal forces, centroids, mo-ment of inertia, vibrations and an introduction to stress and strain. Prerequisite: PHY 117, MTH 112 (or the equivalent) or permission of the instructor. {N} 4 creditsTo be announced, Fall 2007Glenn Ellis, Spring 2008Offered every Fall 2007, Spring 2008

271 Continuum Mechanics IIThis is the second course in a two-semester sequence designed to introduce students to fundamental theoreti-cal principles and analysis of mechanics of continuous media, including solids and fluids. Concepts and top-ics to be covered in this course include intensive and extensive thermophysical properties of fluids; control-volume and differential expressions for conservation of mass, momentum, and energy; dimensional analysis; and an introduction to additional topics such as vis-cous and open-channel flows. Prerequisite: EGR 270. {N} 4 creditsPaul Voss and Andrew GuswaOffered every Spring

272 The Science and Mechanics of MaterialsThis course focuses on the fundamentals of the me-chanics of materials and provides students with a brief introduction to materials science and the finite element method. Structural behavior will be analyzed, along with the material and geometric contributions to this behavior. Lecture topics will be complemented with hands-on laboratory experiments. Topics include stress and strain, deformations and deflections, methods of approximation, crystalline and structure dislocation

and thermal behavior of materials. Prerequistes: EGR 270 and CHM 111, or the equivalent. {N} 4 creditsBorjana MikicOffered every Spring

273 Mechanics LaboratoryThis is a required noncredit laboratory course that meets once a week. Co-requisites: EGR 271 and/or EGR 272.Paul Voss, To be announcedOffered every Spring

274/PHY 220 Classical MechanicsNewtonian dynamics of particles and rigid bodies, os-cillations. Prerequisite: 115, 116, 210 or permission of the instructor. {N} 4 creditsMalgorzata Zielinska-PfabéOffered every Spring

290 Engineering ThermodynamicsModern civilization relies profoundly on efficient production, management and consumption of energy. Thermodynamics is the science of energy transforma-tions involving work, heat and the properties of mat-ter. Engineers rely on thermodynamics to assess the feasibility of their designs in a wide variety of fields including chemical processing, pollution control and abatement, power generation, materials science, engine design, construction, refrigeration and microchip pro-cessing. Course topics include first and second laws of thermodynamics, power cycles, combustion and refrig-eration, phase equilibria, ideal and non-ideal mixtures, conductive, convective and radiative heat transfer. Prerequisites (or co-requisites): EGR 260 and PHY 210 (or the equivalents) or permission of the instructor. {N} 4 creditsDonna RileyOffered every Fall

302 Materials EngineeringMaterials science and engineering is at the forefront of technologies addressing elder care, manipulating weather, walking robots, plastic bridges, the body as a network, photonics, biomimetics and fashion. At the heart of this conversation is the need to understand the material’s structure (defect chemistry) and the manip-ulation of this structure. Topics include the influence of structure on electrical, optical, thermal, magnetic and thermomechanical behavior of solids. An emphasis will be placed on ceramics and glass. Students will address

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materials selection with respect to thermomechanical design. Prerequisites: EGR 272 and CHM 111 (or the equivalent). {N} 4 creditsLinda JonesOffered every Fall

311/GEO 301 Aqueous GeochemistryThis project-based course examines the geochemical reactions that result from interaction of water with the natural system. Water an soil samples collected from a weekend field trip will serve as the basis for understand-ing principles of pH, alkalinity, equilibrium thermody-namics, mineral solubility, soil chemistry, redox reac-tions, acid rain and acid mine drainage. The laboratory will emphasize wet-chemistry analytical techniques. Participants will prepare regular reports based on laboratory analyses, building to a final analysis of the project study area. One weekend field trip. Prerequisite: One geology course and CHM 111. Enrollment limited to 9. {N} 4 creditsAmy RhodesOffered Fall 2007, Fall 2009

312 Thermochemical Processes in the AtmosphereAir pollution is a problem of local, regional and global scale that requires an understanding of the sources of pollutants in the atmosphere, their fate and transport, and their effects on humans and the environment. This course provides the technical background for understanding and addressing air pollution in both engineering and policy terms, with an emphasis on engineering controls. Prerequisites: CHM 111, PHY 210 and EGR 210 (or equivalents) or EGR 260 or permis-sion of the instructor. 4 creditsPaul VossNot offered in 2007–08

315 EcohydrologyThis course focuses on the measurement and modeling of hydrologic processes and their interplay with ecosys-tems. Material includes the statistical and mathemati-cal representation of infiltration, evapotranspiration, plant uptake, and runoff over a range of scales (plot to watershed). The course will address characterization of the temporal and spatial variability of environmental parameters and representation of the processes. The course includes a laboratory component and introduces students to the Pioneer Valley, the cloud forests of Costa Rica, African savannas and the Florida Everglades.

Prerequisites: MTH 112 or 114 and MTH 245 or 241. 4 creditsAndrew GuswaOffered Fall 2007

319/GEO 309 Groundwater GeologyA study of the occurrence, movement and exploitation of water in geologic materials. Topics include well hy-draulics, groundwater chemistry, the relationship of ge-ology to groundwater occurrence, basin-wide ground-water development and groundwater contamination. A class project will involve studying a local groundwater problem. Prerequisites: 111, 121 or FYS 134 and MTH 111. Enrollment limited to 14. {N} 4 creditsRobert NewtonOffered Fall 2008

320 Signals and SystemsThe concepts of linear system theory (e.g., Signals and Systems) are fundamental to all areas of engineering, including the transmission of radio signals, signal processing techniques (e.g., medical imaging, speech recognition), and the design of feedback systems (e.g., in automobiles, power plants). This course will intro-duce the basic concepts of linear system theory, includ-ing convolution, continuous and discrete time Fourier analysis, Laplace and Z transforms, sampling, stability, feedback, control and modulation. Examples will be utilized from electrical, mechanical, biomedical, en-vironmental and chemical engineering. Prerequisites: EGR 220 and PHY 210. {M} 4 creditsSusan VossOffered every Spring

321 Digital Signal ProcessingDigital signal processing (DSP) is the application of engineering tools and techniques to the analysis of signals so that relevant information can be extracted. DSP is important in a broad range of engineering arenas, including biomedical, chemical, electrical, environmental and mechanical engineering. This course covers the fundamental concepts of digital sig-nal processing, including data acquisition, analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog conversion, digital filter-ing, discrete-time Fourier Transform, Discrete Fourier Transform, sampling, random signals, time averages, auto- and cross-correlation functions, windowing and linear prediction. Prerequisite: EGR 320. {M} 4 creditsSusan VossNot offered in 2007–08

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324/PHY 314 Advanced ElectrodynamicsA continuation of PHY 214. Electromagnetic waves in matter; the potential formulation and gauge transfor-mations; dipole radiation; relativistic electrodynamics. Prerequisite: PHY 211 or permission of the instructor. {N} 2 or 4 creditsDoreen WeinbergerNot offered in 2007–08

325 Electric Energy SystemsThe course introduces students both to a variety of energy conversion technologies (renewable, hydro, nuclear and fossil), and to the operation of electric power systems. Coursework includes broad analyses of the conversion technologies and computer simulation of power systems. Engineering, policy, environmental and societal aspects of energy conversion and energy use are discussed. A team-based project will analyze the system and societal impacts of different energy tech-nologies for meeting a region’s electricity needs. Enroll-ment limited to 20 students. {N} 4 creditsJudith CardellOffered Spring 2008

330 Engineering and Global DevelopmentThis course examines the engineering and policy issues around global development, with a focus on appropri-ate and intermediate technologies. Topics include water supply and treatment, sustainable food production, energy systems, and other technologies for meeting basic human needs. Students will design and build a prototype for an intermediate technology. Restricted to students with junior standing in engineering or those who have obtained the instructor’s permission. Enroll-ment limited to 12. (E) {N} 4 creditsDonna RileyOffered Spring 2008

337/CHM 337 Materials ChemistryThis course provides an introduction to the interdis-ciplinary field of materials from a chemist’s view-point. Students will learn fundamentals of solid state chemistry as well as techniques used to synthesize and characterize materials (including crystalline and amorphous solids as well as thin films). These concepts will be applied to current topics in materials chemistry, culminating in a final paper and oral presentation on a topic of each student’s choice. Prerequisite: CHM 224 or equivalent or permission of the instructor. Offered in alternate years. {N} 4 creditsKate QueeneyNot offered in 2007–08

340 Mechanics of Granular MediaAn introduction to the mechanical properties of materi-als in which the continuum assumption is invalid. Topics include classification, hydraulic conductivity, ef-fective stress, volume change, stress-strain relationships and dynamic properties. While soil mechanics will be a major focus of the class, the principles covered will be broadly applicable.Prerequisite: EGR 272 or GEO 241. {N} 4 creditsGlenn EllisNot offered in 2007–08

346 Hydrosystems EngineeringThrough systems analysis and design projects, this course introduces students to the field of water re-sources engineering. Topics include data collection and analysis, decision-making under uncertainty, the hydrologic cycle, hydropower, irrigation, flood control, water supply, engineering economics and water law. Prerequisites: MTH 112 or 114, EGR 271 (or permission of the instructor). 4 creditsAndrew GuswaOffered Spring 2008

354/CSC 364 Computer ArchitectureOffers an introduction to the components of computers and is intended for students who wish to understand how these computer components work and intercon-nect. The class will explain as completely as possible the nature and characteristics of modern-day comput-ers. Topics covered include the interconnection struc-tures inside a computer, internal and external memo-ries, hardware supporting input and output operations, computer arithmetic and floating point operations, the design of and issues related to the instruction set, archi-tecture of the processor, pipelining, microcoding and multiprocessors. Prerequisites: 270, or 231. {M} 4 creditsDominique ThiébautOffered Fall 2009

363 Mass and Heat TransferThis course covers mass transport phenomena and unit operations for separation processes, with applications in both chemical and environmental engineering. Topics covered in the course include mechanical separations, distillation, gas absorption, liquid extraction, leaching, adsorption and membrane separations. Prerequisites: EGR 260 and either EGR 271 or EGR 290, or permis-sion of the instructor. 4 creditsTo be announcedOffered Fall 2008

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372 Advanced Solid Mechanics and Failure AnalysisBuilding on the fundamentals of solid mechanics and materials science introduced in EGR 272, this course provides students with an advanced development of techniques in failure analysis, including static failure theories, fatigue life prediction and linear elastic frac-ture mechanics. These techniques are used in many aspects of mechanical design and the evaluation of structural integrity. Prerequisites: EGR 270 and EGR 272 or equivalent statics and introductory solid me-chanics. {N} 4 creditsBorjana MikicOffered Fall 2008

373 Skeletal BiomechanicsKnowledge of the mechanical and material behavior of the skeletal system is important for understanding how the human body functions, and how the biome-chanical integrity of the tissues comprising the skeletal system are established during development, maintained during adulthood, and restored following injury. This course will provide a rigorous approach to examining the mechanical behavior of the skeletal tissues, includ-ing bone, tendon, ligament and cartilage. Engineering, basic science and clinical perspectives will be integrated to study applications in the field of orthopaedic bio-mechanics. Enrollment limited to 16. Prerequisites include EGR 272 and BIO 111, or permission of the instructor. {N} 4 creditsBorjana MikicNot offered in 2007–08

380 NeuroengineeringThis course explores how electric potentials are gen-erated across the membranes of cells and how cells use these potentials to send messages. Specific topics include lumped- and distributed-parameter models of cells, core conductor and cable models, action po-tentials, voltage clamp currents, the Hodgkin-Huxley model, myelinated nerve fibers and salutatory conduc-tion, ion channels and gating currents. After thorough study of these cellular processes, the class focuses on three specific technologies that take advantage of electrically-excitable cells within the human body: the cochlear implant, the pacemaker and electrically evoked potentials (e.g., EKG). Prerequisites: MTH 111 and 112 and EGR 220 or PHY 116 and BIO 111 or 112 or permission of the instructor. {N/M} 4 creditsSusan VossOffered Fall 2008

390 Topics in EngineeringThis course explores current topics in engineering. Topics vary by semester. 4 creditsTopic: Science, Technology and EthicsMembers of the departmentOffered Fall 2007, Spring 2008

400 Special StudiesWith permission of the department, sophom*ores may petition the Administrative Board for permission to enroll. Variable credit 1–4 as assigned

410d Engineering Design ClinicThis two-semester course synthesizes and marshals the students’ previous coursework to address a real engi-neering design problem. Students work in teams on yearlong design projects, usually in collaboration with industry and/or government. These projects are supple-mented by course seminars to prepare students for engineering design and professional practice. Seminars include such topics as the engineering design process, project management, team dynamics, engineering economics, professional ethics and responsibility, regulations and standards, technical and professional communication, universal design, work/life balance and sustainability. Attendance at regular team design meetings, weekly progress reports, interim and final reports and multiple presentations are required. Prereq-uisite: EGR 100 and Senior standing in Engineering or permission of the instructor. 8 creditsSusannah HoweOffered Fall and Spring semester each year

The MajorAdvisers: Members of the department

The value of more liberally educated engineers, who typically bring strong communication and abstract rea-soning skills to their work, has recently been acknowl-edged by the national engineering accrediting board, which has moved to give greater weight to the liberal arts in designing curricular standards. Consequently, the engineering major is based on a rigorous plan of study integrated with the liberal arts. Smith offers an undergraduate curriculum lead-ing to an accredited degree in engineering science, the broad study of the theoretical scientific underpinnings

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that govern the practice of all engineering disciplines. The American Society for Engineering Education, iden-tifying the critical need for broadly educated engineers, points out that the design of an engineering curricu-lum should “recognize the pitfalls of overspecialization in the face of an increasing demand for graduates who can demonstrate adaptability to rapidly changing tech-nologies and to increasingly complex multinational markets.” An integral component of the program is the con-tinuous emphasis on the use of engineering science principles in design. This culminates in a final design project that incorporates broad-based societal aspects. Students are encouraged to pursue a corporate and/or research internship to supplement their classroom instruction. Engineers must be able to communicate effectively and work in team settings. Smith’s highly regarded writing-intensive first-year curriculum will ensure that engineering students begin their engineering curricu-lum with appropriate communication skills that will be refined during the remainder of their studies. Virtually every engineering course offered at Smith incorporates elements of teamwork and oral/written communica-tion.

Requirements of the MajorMath: MTH 111 & 112 (or 114), MTH 204, MTH 241 Physics: PHY 117, PHY 118, PHY 210Chemistry: CHM 111 or higherComputer Science: CSC 111Engineering Core: 100, 220, 260, 270, 271, 272, 273, 290, 320, 410 (8 credit Design Clinic)

Technical Electives:Students are required to demonstrate reasonable tech-nical depth by developing a sequence of three themati-cally related engineering electives (two of which must be at the 300 level or higher) selected in consultation with the student’s adviser and with a short proposal outlining the rationale.

Liberal Arts Breadth:Students are required to demonstrate breadth in their curriculum by either:1. fulfilling the Latin Honors distribution require-

ments;2. fulfilling the requirements for another major or

minor within Division I or Division II; or

3. by submitting a cogent proposal describing an alternative approach including all courses that the student will take to acquire curricular breadth for consideration and approval by the engineering faculty and program chair.

Students are strongly encouraged to take an additional course in the natural sciences (e.g., biology, geology). Students will be assessed during their first semester for their mathematical skills and comprehension. A j-term math skills studio is required for students whose math assessment scores are low.

The MinorSome students my wish to minor in engineering as a way to complement their major, supplement their education or stretch and grow in a direction other than their major field.

Advisers: Major advisers also serve as advisers for the minor.

The requirements for the minor in engineering com-prise a total of 6 courses. These courses must include MTH 111 (or higher), PHY 117 (or higher), EGR 100, and three EGR Electives specifically approved by your engineering minor adviser and the program chair. No more than one course designed primarily for non-ma-jors may be included.

HonorsDirector: Linda E. Jones

430d Thesis8 creditsFull-year course; Offered each year

432d Thesis12 creditsFull-year course; Offered each year

Requirements: The same as those for the major, with the addition of a research project in the senior year, culminating in a written thesis and oral presentation and defense of the thesis. 430d or 432d may substitute for one 300-level course.

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English Language and LiteratureVisiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term.

ProfessorsCarol Christ, Ph.D.*1 Dean Scott Flower, Ph.D.William Allan Oram, Ph.D., Chair**2 Jefferson Hunter, Ph.D. **1 Douglas Lane Patey, Ph.D.Charles Eric Reeves, Ph.D.Elizabeth Wanning Harries, Ph.D. (English Language and Literature and Comparative Literature)Sharon Cadman Seelig, Ph.D.†1 Michael Gorra, Ph.D.Richard Millington, Ph.D.**2 Nora F. Crow, Ph.D.Craig R. Davis, Ph.D.Patricia Lyn Skarda, Ph.D.Naomi Miller, Ph.D.*1 Nancy Mason Bradbury, Ph.D.

Professor-in-ResidencePaul Alpers, Ph.D.

Elizabeth Drew ProfessorAmy Bloom. M.S.W.

Grace Hazard Conkling Writer-in-ResidenceNikkey Finney

Joan Leiman Jacobson Visiting Nonfiction WriterHilton Awls (English and American Studies)

Associate Professors†2 Gillian Murray Kendall, Ph.D.Cornelia Pearsall, Ph.D.†1 Luc Gilleman, Ph.D.*2 Michael Thurston, Ph.D.Ambreen Hai, Ph.D.*2 Floyd Cheung, Ph.D.

Mellon Post-Doctoral FellowDanielle Elliot, B.A.

Senior Lecturers**2 Robert Ellis Hosmer, Jr., Ph.D.**2 Ann E. Boutelle, Ph.D.

LecturersJulio Alves, Ph.D.Debra L. Carney, M.F.A.Holly Davis, M.A.Mary Koncel, M.F.A.Brian Turner, M.F.A.Ellen Doré Watson, M.F.A.Sara London, M.F.A.Samuel Scheer, M.Phil.Sara Eddy

The purpose of the English major is to develop a critical and historical understanding of the English language and of the literary traditions it has shaped in Britain, in the Americas and throughout the world. During their study of literature at Smith, English ma-jors are also encouraged to take allied courses in clas-sics, other literatures, history, philosophy, religion, art and theatre. Fuller descriptions of each term’s courses, faculty profiles, and other important information for majors and those interested in literary study can be found on the department’s Web page, accessible via the Smith College home page. Most students will begin their study of literature at Smith with English 120 before proceeding to one of

the courses— 199, 200, 201 and 231—that serve as a gateway for the major. First-year students who have an English Literature and Composition AP score of 4 or 5, or a score of 710 on the Critical Reading portion of the SAT, may enter one of the gateway courses in the fall semester. In 2007–08, English 120, 199 and 201 will be taught as writing intensive courses. Those first-year students who have taken a gateway course in the fall may, after consultation with the instructor, elect a 200-level class beyond the gateway in the spring. To assist students in selecting appropriate courses, the department’s offerings are arranged in Levels I–V, as indicated and explained below.

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Level ICourses numbered 100–199: Introductory Courses, open to all students. In English 118 and 120, incoming students have priority in the fall semester, and other students are welcome as space permits.

First-Level Courses in WritingENG 118 may be repeated, but only with a different instructor and with the permission of the director. Stu-dents who received scores of 4 and 5 on the Advanced Placement tests in English Language and Literature and English Language and Composition may receive 4 credits each, providing they do not take English 118.

118 Colloquia in WritingIn sections limited to 15 students each, this course primarily provides systematic instruction and practice in reading and writing academic prose, with emphasis on argumentation. The course also provides instruc-tion and practice in conducting research and in public speaking. Bilingual students and non-native speakers are especially encouraged to register for sections taught by Melissa Bagg. Priority will be given to incoming students in the fall-semester sections. 4 creditsDirector: Julio AlvesSections as listed below:

Writing, Identity and CulturePractice in writing essays of observation, analysis and argument. Readings cover a range of subjects from questions of personal identity to public issues of culture and politics. A strong focus on working with sources and developing research skills. WIBrian TurnerOffered Fall 2007

Mixing Memory and Desire: Language and the Con-struction of ExperienceHow does language construct what it attempts to describe? What is the connection between words and worlds? Readings will focus on the delights and dangers of language’s transfigurative power, with a particular emphasis on the way words define social, cultural and individual identities. Assignments include three short analytical essays, an oral report and a research paper on a memoirist of your choice. WIMelissa BaggOffered Fall 2007, Spring 2008

The Politics of LanguageReading, thinking and writing about the forces that govern and shape language. A series of analytical es-says will focus on issues such as political correctness, obscenity, gender bias in language and censorship. WIHolly DavisOffered Fall 2007

Aspects of BlacknessReading and writing about aspects of black history, identity and politics. WIJulio AlvesOffered Fall 2007

Riding the Wave: The Women’s Movement, 1968–79Reading and writing about the women’s movement of the late 1960s and 1970s, often called Second Wave Feminism. Readings will include primary documents, secondary sources and statistical data. Writing will include scholarly essays, biography and mixed genres. Regular library research and oral presentations. (E) (WI) 4 creditsJulio AlvesOffered Spring 2008

Clearing Customs: Locations and Dislocations in Travel LiteratureThe readings for this course include a variety of texts by writers exploring and reacting to unfamiliar lands, cultures and customs. Students will respond to the challenges posed by these texts and analyze the ideas they contain. Four short essays, a research paper and an oral report are required. WI Debra CarneyOffered Fall 2007

The Last Laugh: Writing About HumorReading and writing about humor and its significance in our lives. Several informal and formal analytical and argumentative essays will explore topics such as the definition of humor, the forms of humor, and the cultural, political and social functions of humor. WIMary A. KoncelOffered Fall 2007

First-Level Courses in Literature112 Reading Contemporary PoetryThis course offers the opportunity to read contemporary poetry and meet the poets who write it. Class sessions,

English Language and Literature

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led by the director of the Poetry Center, alternate with readings by visiting poets. Graded Satisfactory/Unsatis-factory only. Course may be repeated. {L} 2 creditsEllen Doré WatsonOffered Fall 2007

120 Colloquia in LiteratureEach colloquium is conducted by means of directed discussion, with emphasis on close reading and the writing of short analytical essays. Priority will be given to incoming students in the fall-semester sections of the colloquia. Other students should consult the course director about possible openings. Enrollment in each section limited to 18. 4 credits

FictionA study of the novel, novella and short story, stressing the formal elements of fiction, with intensive analysis of works by such writers as Austen, Dickens, James, Faulkner, Joyce, Lawrence and Woolf. {L} WIRobert Hosmer, Sharon Seelig, Eric Reeves, Sara LondonOffered Fall 2007, Spring 2008

The Gothic in LiteratureTerror, guilt and the supernatural in novels, tales and poems from the 18th to the 20th century. Authors in-clude Walpole, Lewis, Austen, Coleridge, Mary Shelley, Byron, Charlotte Brontë and James. {L} WINora F. CrowOffered Fall 2007

Reading and Writing Short PoemsA course in the nuts and bolts of poetry. We will look at poems and study their techniques (e.g., sound patterns, image developmenet, form). We will write and revise our own poems, using these techniques. Poets include Basho, Christopher Smart, Walt Whitman, Gwendolyn Brooks, Eavan Boland, Li-Young Lee. {L} WIAnn BoutelleOffered Fall 2007, Spring 2008

Reading and Writing Short StoriesReading of short stories from the point of view of the would-be writer, with special attention to such prob-lems as dialogue, narration, characterization and style. Writing includes analysis, imitation or parody and original stories. {L} WISara LondonOffered Fall 2007

Writing American LivesA study of autobiographical writings that explore the possibilities and limitations involved in being and be-coming American. Authors include Benjamin Franklin, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Zitkala-Sa, James Weldon Johnson, Mitsuye Yamada, Richard Rodriguez, Sara Vowell, Monique Thuy-Dung Truong, Geeta Kothari and others. {L} WISara EddyOffered Fall 2007

Shakespeare and FilmA study of the way filmmakers edit, distort, clarify and otherwise interpret Shakespeare’s plays; the process of metamorphosing theatre into film, imagery into image. Works to be studied include Henry V, Richard III, Romeo and Juliet, King Lear, Twelfth Night, The Winter’s Tale. {L} WIGillian KendallOffered Fall 2007

Scandinavian MythologyA reading in translation of the major works in poetry and prose that retell or reflect traditions of the early Norse divinities and their cults. Exploration of the inti-mate and violent relations between groups of powerful, intelligent but very mortal beings: male and female, giant and god, Æsir and Vanir, dwarf, troll, elf, and the social classes of human being. From its Old European and Indo-European roots, Nordic religion created a highly distinctive complex of values and competing views of the world: an unusually dark theory of history; an ironic, sometimes comic view of divine and human nature; and paradoxical constructions of sexual, eth-nic, mantic and other forms of identity. WI {L} Craig R. DavisOffered Spring 2008

Modern DramaReading of a selection of modern and contemporary plays that investigate problems of language and iden-tity. Playwrights to include Pinter, Stoppard, Churchill, Handke, Pomerance, Albee, Rabe, O’Neill, Beckett, Shaffer, Pirandello. {L} WILuc GillemanOffered Fall 2007

Representing the CaribbeanSince the “discovery” of the New World, how have English writers represented the Caribbean, and for what

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purposes? More recently, how have writers from the Caribbean tried to re-present their lands and peoples? Why does it matter who represents a history or a region, and for whom? This course will engage with the history and politics of the representation and construction of the Caribbean in English literature. We will begin with Shakespeare’s The Tempest, read 18th- and 19th-cen-tury texts such as Oroonoko, Equiano’s Travels, and Jane Eyre, and end with postcolonial writers like Rhys, Walcott, Kincaid, Danticat. We will also look at some tourist advertisem*nts, art and films. {L} WIAmbreen HaiOffered Fall 2007

Modern Short StoriesA study of the short story sequence as a characteristic modern genre, focusing on such writers as Sherwood Anderson, Edna O’Brien, Eudora Welty, William Trevor, and others. {L} WIDean FlowerOffered Spring 2008

Level II.Courses numbered 199–249. Open to all sophom*ores, juniors, and seniors, and to qualified first-year stu-dents.

Gateway CoursesThese four classes serve as entry points to the major, introductions to the critical, historical and method-ological issues and questions that underlie the study of literatures in English. English majors must select at least two courses from this menu. Fall gateway courses are open to first-year students with the English Litera-ture and Composition AP score of 4 or 5, or a score of 710 on the Critical Reading portion of the SAT.

199 Methods of Literary StudyThis course teaches the skills that enable us to read literature with understanding and pleasure. By study-ing examples from a variety of periods and places, students will learn how poetry, prose fiction and drama work, how to interpret them and how to make use of interpretations by others. English 199 seeks to produce perceptive readers well equipped to take on complex

texts. Readings in different sections will vary, but all will involve active discussion and frequent writing. {L} WI 4 creditsFloyd Cheung, Richard Millington, Fall 2007Sharon Seelig, Jefferson Hunter, Michael Thurston, Spring 2008Offered both semesters each year

200 The English Literary Tradition IA study of the English literary tradition from the Middle Ages through the 18th century. Recommended for sophom*ores. {L} 4 creditsDouglas PateyOffered Fall 2007

201 The English Literary Tradition IIA study of the English literary tradition from the 19th century to modern times. {L} WI 4 creditsCornelia Pearsall, Luc GillemanOffered Spring 2008

231 American Literature before 1865A study of American writers as they seek to define a role for literature in their changing society. Emphasis on the extraordinary burst of creativity that took place between the 1820s and the Civil War. Works by Cooper, Hawthorne, Emerson, Thoreau, Melville, Douglass, Stowe, Whitman, Dickinson and others. {L} 4 creditsMichael ThurstonOffered Fall 2007

Level Two ElectivesThese courses in particular are designed to interest non-majors as well as minors.

202/CLT 202 Western Classics in Translation, from Homer to DanteTexts include the Iliad; tragedies by Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides; Plato’s Symposium; Virgil’s Aeneid; Dante’s Divine Comedy. {L} WI 4 creditsLecture and discussionThalia Pandiri (Classics)Elizabeth Wanning Harries, Director (English Language and Literature)Robert Hosmer, (English Language and Literature)Maria Banerjee (Russian)Offered Fall 2007

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203/CLT 203 Western Classics in Translation, from Chrétien de Troyes to TolstoyChrétien de Troyes’s Yvain; Shakespeare’s Antony and Cleopatra; Cervantes’ Don Quixote; Lafayette’s The Princesse of Clèves; Goethe’s Faust; Tolstoy’s War and Peace. Prerequisite: ENG 202/CLT 202. {L} WI 4 creditsLecture and DiscussionElizabeth Harries (English Language and Literature)Maria Banerjee (Russian)Offered Spring 2008

205 Telling and RetellingA study of recent novels and their famous antecedents. What are the pleasures of reading? What do we need to know to be good readers of contemporary fictions that revise or at least allude to work of the past? Texts include Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and Mary Reilly; Jane Eyre and Wide Sargasso Sea; King Lear and A Thousand Acres; Tess of the d’Urbervilles and The French Lieutenant’s Woman; Pride and Prejudice and Presumption: An Entertainment; Possession. Recommended for non-majors. {L} 4 creditsPatricia SkardaOffered Spring 2008

208 Science Fiction? Speculative Fiction?What sort of problems does science fiction address, what are its conventions and how is it related to other genres—utopia, fantasy, romance, imaginary voyage? Particular attention to the theme of the “other” (mon-sters, aliens, robots, living planets). Readings in Wells, Zamyatin, Stapleton, Lem, Hoban, Dick, Le Guin, and others. Recommended for non-majors. {L} 4 creditsWilliam OramOffered Spring 2008

211 BeowulfA reading of Anglo-Saxon England’s most powerful and significant poem. {L/F} 4 creditsCraig R. DavisOffered Fall 2007

214 Medieval WelshAn introduction to the language and literature of me-dieval Wales in a series of graduated grammar lessons and readings from the first branch of the Mabinogi, Pwyll Prince of Dyfed (14th century), as well as from

other tales of refracted Celtic mythology, the early Arthurian legend and poems of praise, love, loss and Otherworld adventure. {L} 4 creditsCraig R. DavisOffered Spring 2008

227 Modern British FictionLectures, with occasional discussion, on the English novel from Conrad to the present day. The historical contexts and the formal devices (management of nar-rative and plot, stylistic and structural innovations, characterization, literary allusiveness) of works by such writers as Joseph Conrad, E.M. Forster, F.M. Ford, D.H. Lawrence, Virginia Woolf, Elizabeth Bowen, Doris Less-ing, Shirley Hazzard, V.S. Naipaul. {L} 4 creditsJefferson HunterOffered Fall 2007

228 Children’s LiteratureThis course progresses from the nature of the fairy tale as genre, to the unique form of the picture book, to a book written for adults that has metamorphosed into children’s literature (Gulliver) and a book written for children that has become a book for adults (Alice). The syllabus covers coming-of-age stories, dark stories filled with imagery of mortality and stories that ridicule what has been considered the standard literature for chil-dren. The course also explores the nature and function of fantasy written for children, and ends with a good crop of ghost stories. {L} 4 creditsGillian KendallOffered Spring 2008

229 African American PoetryThis survey course explores the diverse poetic contribu-tions made by African Americans. We examine several movements in poetry from the earliest black poets (Phyllis Wheatley and Lucy Terry) to contemporary poetry published in the 21st century (Rita Dove and Elizabeth Alexander). Rather than a steady chrono-logical march through the more than three hundred years of poetry, we will read clusters of poems that best illustrate particular styles, movements, eras and recur-rent themes including jazz poetry, poetry of social com-mentary, the Black Arts Movement, modernist lyrics, black feminism, and avant-garde poetics. Emphasis on critical close reading and analysis. (E) {L} 4 creditsDanielle ElliottOffered Fall 2007

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230/ JUD 258 American Jewish LiteratureJewish literary engagement with America, from im-migrant writing on the margins in Yiddish to the influence of native-born authors and critics in shaping the post-war literary scene. Topics include narratives of immigration and acculturation; the myth of America and its discontents; the Yiddish literary world on the Lower East Side; the New York Intellectuals; ethnic satire; crises of the left involving Communism, Black-Jewish relations, and ‘60s radicalism; the Holocaust in American culture; the tension between Israel and America as “promised lands”; and contemporary voices in search of new hybrid identities. Must Jewish writing in America remain on the margins, “too Jewish” for the mainstream yet “too white” for the new multicultural curriculum? Novels, short stories, poetry, and essays by recipients of the Nobel and Pulitzer prizes, the National Book Award, and many others. Intended for students seeking a course on ethnic/multicultural literature of the United States and/or American Jewish culture. {L} 4 creditsJustin D. CammyOffered Spring 2009

233 American Literature from 1865 to 1914A survey of American writing after the Civil War, with an emphasis on writers who criticize or stand apart from their rapidly changing society. Fiction by Twain, James, Howells, Dreiser, Crane, Chopin, Chesnutt, Jew-ett, and Sui Sin Far; along with a selection of the poetry of the era. {L} 4 creditsRichard MillingtonOffered Spring 2008

235 Modern American WritingAmerican writing in the first half of the 20th century, with emphasis on modernism. Fiction by Cather, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Hurston, Faulkner; poetry by Frost, Stevens, Eliot, Pound and Bishop. {L} 4 creditsDean FlowerOffered Spring 2008

CLT 235 Fairy Tales and GenderA study of the literary fairy tale in Europe from the 1690s to the 1990s, with emphasis on the ways women have written, rewritten and transformed them. Some attention to oral storytelling and to related stories in other cultures. Writers will include Aulnoy, Perrault, le Prince de Beaumont, the Grimms, Andersen, Christina Rossetti, Angela Carter, Sexton, Broumas. Prerequisite:

at least one college-level course in literature. Not open to first-year students. {L} 4 creditsElizabeth HarriesOffered Fall 2007

236/AAS 237 Twentieth Century Afro-American LiteratureA survey of the evolution of African-American literature during the 20th century. This class will build on the foundations established in AAS 113, Survey of Afro-American Literature. Writers include Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, James Baldwin, Toni Morrison and Paule Marshall. {L} 4 creditsDaphne LamotheOffered Fall 2007

238 What Jane Austen Read: The 18th-Century NovelA study of novels written in England from Aphra Behn to Jane Austen and Mary Shelley (1688–1818). Empha-sis on the novelists’ narrative models and choices, with special attention to novels by and about women. {L}Douglas PateyOffered Fall 2007

240 Modern British and American DramaA study of recent developments in British and Ameri-can drama, emphasizing interconnectedness and cross-fertilization: theatre of passion; absurdism; lan-guage-oriented realism; talk drama; and postmodern, performance-oriented plays. Works by Williams, Miller, Beckett, Osborne, Pinter, Albee, Shepard, Mamet, Rabe, Shaffer, Churchill, Hwang. Occasional screenings of plays. {L} 4 creditsLuc GillemanOffered Spring 2008

FLS 240 Film and MusicA survey of film and music in their various relations. Music in an essential cinematic technique; music as a rich subject for film. Examples drawn from differ-ent periods and countries: the mainline cinema with orchestral scores, silent film with various kinds of ac-companiment, animation with music, filmed musical comedy and opera, musical biopics, television drama with lip-synched songs, the Bollywood musical. Pre-requisite: a college course in film, literature, or music. {A/L} 4 creditsJefferson HunterOffered Spring 2008

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241 Postcolonial LiteratureAn introduction to Anglophone fiction, nonfiction, poetry, drama and film from Africa, the Caribbean and South Asia in the aftermath of the British empire. Con-cerns include: how writers respond to histories of co-lonial dominance; their ambivalence towards English linguistic, literary and cultural legacies; how literature can (re)construct national identities and histories, and explore/expose ideas of race, gender and sexuality; what are some consequences of global diasporas, mi-gration and U.S. imperialism. Possible writers: Achebe, Soyinka, Ngugi, Aidoo, Dangaremba, Naipaul, Walcott, Cliff, Rushdie, Kureishi, Arundhati Roy, Lahiri and some theoretical essays. {L} 4 creditsAmbreen HaiOffered Fall 2007

Level IIICourses numbered 250–299. Open to sophom*ores, juniors and seniors; first-year students admitted only with the permission of the instructor. Recommended background: at least one English course above the 100 level, or as specified in the course description.

250 ChaucerHis art and his social and literary background. Empha-sis on the Canterbury Tales. Students should have had at least two semester courses in literature. {L} 4 creditsNancy Mason BradburyOffered Spring 2008

255 For the Love of God and Woman: Seventeenth-Century PoetryAn exploration of the remarkable variety of 17th-cen-tury lyric poetry, which includes voices secular and sacred, witty and devout, bitter and sweet, male and female. Attention to poetic forms, conventions, and imagery, to response and adaptation of those forms. Particular emphasis on Donne, Jonson, Herbert and Marvell, set in the context of their time and their con-temporaries. {L} 4 creditsSharon SeeligOffered Fall 2007

256 ShakespeareA Midsummer Night’s Dream, As You Like It, I Henry IV, Measure for Measure, King Lear, Macbeth,

Coriolanus, The Tempest. Enrollment in each section limited to 25. Not open to first-year students. {L} 4 creditsGillian KendallOffered Fall 2007

257 ShakespeareRomeo and Juliet, Richard II, Hamlet, Twelfth Night, Troilus and Cressida, Othello, Antony and Cleopatra, The Winter’s Tale. Not open to first-year students. {L} 4 creditsEric Reeves, Sharon SeeligOffered Spring 2008

259 Pope, Swift, and Their CircleDiscussion of the major figures, Pope and Swift, to-gether with their contemporaries Defoe, Prior, Addison and Gay. {L} 4 creditsNora F. CrowOffered Spring 2008

260 MiltonA study of the major poems and selected prose of John Milton, radical and conservative, heretic and defender of the faith, apologist for patriarchy and advocate of human dignity, the last great Renaissance humanist, a poet of enormous creative power and influence. {L} 4 creditsEric ReevesOffered Fall 2007

263 Romantic Poetry and ProseConcentration on selected poems of the major Ro-mantics (Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats), with prose writings by the poets themselves and by Austen and Mary Shelley. {L} 4 creditsPatricia SkardaOffered Fall 2007

266 Literature of the Victorian PeriodA study of the range of Victorian literature, including works by Tennyson, the Brownings, Arnold, the Pre-Raphaelites, Carroll and Hopkins, with attention to literary, cultural and social contexts. Exploration of such topics as the tensions between conformity and transgression, the role of women, and the place of po-etry in a shifting society. {L} 4 creditsCornelia PearsallOffered Spring 2008

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267 Introduction to Asian American LiteratureAlthough we sometimes think only of modern-day authors like Amy Tan or Jhumpa Lahiri when we think of Asian American literature, in fact Asian Americans have been writing and publishing in English since at least 1887. In this course, we will read selected Asian American poetry, novels, short stories, plays and films produced from the late 19th century until the present. We will consider how works engage with issues that have always concerned Asian Americans, like identity development and racism. Also, we will pay attention to how works speak to concerns specific to their period, such as the exclusion acts of the 1880s, the proletarian movement of the 1930s, the decolonization of South Asian and Southeast Asian countries since the 1940s, and the increasing size and diversity of the Asian American population in the late 20th century. At all times, we will attend closely to matters of language and form. {L} 4 creditsFloyd CheungOffered Fall 2007

268 Studies in Literary Genres: The Sonnet SequenceThis course explores problems of literary form and literary history through a historical examination of the sonnet sequence focused on two especially important moments in that form’s career: its original English-language flowering in the 16th century and its reap-pearance in the 20th century. Readings will include Sidney’s Astrophel and Stella, Spenser’s Amoretti, Shakespeare’s sonnets, and Donne’s Holy Sonnets, Millay’s Conversation at Midnight, Auden’s “Sonnets from China,” Brooks’s Annie Allen, Hacker’s Love, Death, and the Changing of the Seasons, and Voigt’s Kyrie. Prerequisite: ENG 199, 200, or 201. (E) {L} 4 creditsWilliam Oram and Michael ThurstonOffered Spring 2008

270 The King James Bible and Its Literary HeritageA study of language and narrative technique in selected parts of the King James Bible with attention to its influ-ence on subsequent writing in English. Selections from the Old and New Testaments and works by Milton, Wordsworth, Hawthorne, Hardy, Frost and MacLeish. Recommended background: REL 210 and 220. {L} 4 creditsPatricia SkardaOffered Spring 2008

279 American Women PoetsA selection of poets from the last 50 years, including Sylvia Plath, Diane Gilliam Fisher, Elizabeth Bishop, Adrienne Rich, Audre Lorde, Sharon Olds, Cathy Song, Louise Glück, and Rita Dove. An exploration of each poet’s chosen themes and distinctive voice, with atten-tion to the intersection of gender and ethnicity in the poet’s materials and in the creative process. Not open to first-year students. Prerequisite: at least one college course in literature. {L} 4 creditsSusan Van DyneOffered Fall 2007

282/AAS 245 Colloquium: The Harlem RenaissanceA study of one of the first cohesive cultural movements in African-American history. This class will focus on de-velopments in politics, and civil rights (NAACP, Urban League, UNIA), creative arts (poetry, prose, painting, sculpture) and urban sociology (modernity, the rise of cities). Writers and subjects will include Zora Neale Hurston, David Levering Lewis, Gloria Hull, Langston Hughes and Nella Larsen. Enrollment limited to 40. {S} 4 creditsDaphne LamotheOffered Spring 2008

285 Introduction to Contemporary Literary TheoryAn introduction to major theoretical questions and debates shaping the course of literary studies today, regarding what literature is, how literature is (to be) read, how literature functions within culture and soci-ety, how theory and literature may interact. Attention to theory and practice of such 20th-century critical move-ments as the New Criticism, structuralism, poststruc-turalism, Marxism, psychoanalysis, cultural studies, as well as to challenges from theories of gender, sexuality, feminism, queer, race, transnationalism. Prerequisite: a college course in literature or permission of the instruc-tor. {L} 4 creditsAmbreen HaiOffered Spring 2008

ARH 292/ENG 293 The Art and History of the Book (C)A survey of the book—as vehicle for the transmission of both text and image—from the manuscripts of the middle ages to contemporary artists’ books. The course will examine the principal techniques of book produc-tion—calligraphy, illustration, papermaking, typog-raphy, bookbinding—as well as various social and cultural aspects of book history, including questions

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of censorship, verbal and visual literacy, the role of the book trade, and the book as an agent of change. In addition, there will be labs in printing on the handpress and bookbinding. Admission limited to 20 by permis-sion of the instructor. {H/A} 4 creditsMartin AntonettiOffered Fall 2007

Advanced Courses in WritingOnly one course in writing may be taken in any one semester except by permission of the chair. Courses in writing above the 100 level may be repeated for credit only with the permission of the instructor and the chair. For all writing courses above the 100 level, no student will be admitted to a section until she has applied at the English office in Pierce Hall 105, submitted appropriate examples of her work, and received permission of the instructor. Deadlines will be posted.

216 Intermediate Poetry WritingStudents gain reading mastery by close attention to poems of diverse sensibilities and intentions, and are given practice creating poetic effects through tone, diction, rhythm, image, lineation, anaphora, allitera-tion, assonance, syllabics and irregular rhyme. They create a portfolio of original poems and develop the skills of critique and revision. Poems and craft essays are assigned for each class, as well as packets of poems by visiting writers. Students will be expected to attend Poetry Center readings and Q&A’s. Recommended background: ENG 120 Reading and Writing Short Po-ems. (E) 4 creditsEllen Doré WatsonOffered Spring 2008

290 Crafting Creative NonfictionA writers’ workshop designed to explore the complexi-ties and delights of creative nonfiction. Constant read-ing, writing and critiquing. Admission by permission of the instructor. {L} 4 creditsAnn Boutelle, Hilton Als, Nora CrowOffered Fall 2007, Spring 2008

292 Crafting the MemoirIn this workshop, we will explore, through reading and through writing, the presentation of self in the memoir. A major focus will be on the interweaving of voice, structure, style and content. As we read the work of ourselves and of others, we will be searching for strate-gies, devices, rhythms, patterns and approaches that

we might adapt in future writings. The reading list will consist of writings by 20th-century women. Admission by permission of the instructor. {L} 4 creditsAnn BoutelleOffered Spring 2008

295 Advanced Poetry WritingAdmission by permission of the instructor. {L}4 creditsNikky FinneyOffered Fall 2007, Spring 2008

296 Writing Short StoriesAdmission by permission of the instructor. {L}4 creditsAmy BloomOffered Fall 2007, Spring 2008

384/AMS 351 Writing About American SocietyAn examination of contemporary American issues through the works of such literary journalists as Ja-maica Kincaid, John McPhee, Tom Wolfe, Joan Didion and Jessica Mitford; and intensive practice in expository writing to develop the student’s own skills in analyzing complex social issues and expressing herself artfully in this form. May be repeated with a different instructor and with the permission of the director of the program. Enrollment limited. Admission by permission of the instructor. {L/S} 4 creditsHilton AlsOffered Spring 2008

Level IV300-Level courses, but not seminars. These courses are intended primarily for juniors and seniors who have taken at least two literature courses above the 100-level. Other interested students need the permission of the instructor.

348/AAS 348 Black Women WritersHow does gender matter in a black context? That is the question we will ask and attempt to answer through an examination of works by such authors as Phillis Wheatley, Pauline Hopkins, Nella Larsen, Zora Hurston, Toni Morrison, Alice Walker, Gayl Jones and Audre Lorde. Prerequisite: one college-level literature course or permission of the instructor. {L} 4 creditsDaphne LamotheOffered Spring 2008

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399 Teaching LiteratureDiscussion of poetry, short stories, short novels, essays and drama with particular emphasis on the ways in which one might teach them. Consideration of the uses of writing and the leading of discussion classes. For upper-level undergraduates and graduate students who have an interest in teaching. {L} 4 creditsSamuel ScheerOffered Fall 2007

Level VSeminars. Seminars are open only to juniors and se-niors, and admission is by permission of the instructor.

Seminars in the English department stand as the cap-stone experience in the major. They bring students into the public aspects of intellectual life, and the papers they require are not only longer but also different in kind from those in 200-level classes. These papers re-quire a research component in which students engage the published arguments of others, or at least demon-strate an awareness of the ongoing critical conversa-tion their work is entering. But such work proves most useful when most available, and so we also require that students present their thinking in some way to the semi-public sphere of the seminar itself. All students who wish to take a seminar must apply at the English department office by the last day of the pre-registration period. The instructor will select the students admitted from these applicants.

333 Seminar: A Major British or American WriterTopic: Nathaniel Hawthorne. Intensive study of the writing of Nathaniel Hawthorne—cultural analyst, explorer of the psyche, and narrative strategist. Atten-tion, too, to recent debates in American literary study, in which Hawthorne’s texts have figured significantly.Richard MillingtonOffered Spring 2008

345 Tales Within Tales Within TalesWhy do writers enclose stories within other stories? What is the function of narrative frames? Why does Scheherezade tell tales within tales in order to ward off death? We will read frame tales from many periods and cultures, from The Arabian Nights to Boccaccio and Chaucer to Shelley’s Frankenstein and Anne Sexton’s Transformations, as well as some critical writing on

framing, as we try to answer these questions. Enroll-ment limited to 12. {L} 4 creditsElizabeth HarriesOffered Spring 2008

352 Seminar: The Middle Passage in Contemporary Black Literature and CulturePoet Robert Hayden described the Middle Passage of the slave trade as a “voyage through death” that trans-ported Africans across the Atlantic to the Americas. This course explores the legacy of the Middle Passage in contemporary literature and culture from 1969 to today looking at how past is made present. Through poetry, novels, short stories, film and visual art on the Middle Passage, we will consider how this historical phenom-enon works as motif in black culture and site of trauma for black artists. We will examine the ways different genres achieve particular nuances in their expressions of this voyage. Prerequisite: a 200-level course in Eng-lish or Afro-American Studies. (E) {L} 4 creditsDanielle ElliottOffered Fall 2007

353 Seminar: Advanced Studies in ShakespeareTopic: To be announced.Gillian KendallOffered Spring 2008

362 Satire: Execution by WordsA consideration of theoretical problems (definitions of satire, responses to satire, satiric strategies) followed by a study of the development of satire from Horace and Juvenal through Shakespeare, Swift, Pope, Austen, and Byron to Waugh, West, and Vonnegut. Some attention given to differences between male and female satirists. {L} 4 creditsNora F. CrowOffered Fall 2007

365 Seminar: Studies in 19th-Century LiteratureThe Brontës. A study of the lives and works of the remarkable Brontë sisters and their shadowy brother, exploring the literary, cultural and familial circum-stances that aided and impeded the development of their art. Novels, poetry and paintings by Charlotte Brontë, Emily Brontë, Anne Brontë and Branwell Brontë. {L} 4 creditsCornelia PearsallOffered Fall 2007

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387 Asian American AutobiographyTopic: Asian Americans Abroad: Narratives of Identity and Location. A consideration of the best written and most thoughtful travel writings by Asian Americans. How are Asian Americans perceived and how do they perceive themselves when they are abroad, especially in their countries of heritage? In most cases, travel complicates rather than clarifies the relationship between identity and location. Likely authors to be studied include Kyoko Mori, Luis Francia, Katy Robin-son, David Mura, Andrew Pham, Paiskey Rekdal, and Meena Alexander. {L} 4 creditsFloyd CheungOffered Spring 2008

395 Freud and Sherlock HolmesReadings include Freud’s case studies and Conan Doyle’s detective stories; popular accounts of Freud and Holmes in fiction, film and drama; and critical investi-gations of their economies of signification (forays into various critical -isms). Practical component: keeping a dream journal and collaborative writing of a detec-tive story or fictionalized case study. Prerequisite: an advanced literature course and interest in theory {L} 4 creditsLuc GillemanOffered Fall 2007

Cross-listed and Interdepartmental CoursesCLT 205 Twentieth-Century Literature of Africa

CLT 237 Traveller’s Tales

CLT 240 Childhood in Literatures of Africa and the African Diaspora

CLT 295 Modern Short Stories

CLT 300 Contemporary Literary Theory

THE 261 Writing for the Theatre

400 Special Studies1 to 4 creditsOffered both semesters each year

408d Special Studies8 creditsFull-year course; Offered each year

The MajorAdvisers: Members of the department

Major Requirements

Twelve semester courses are required for the major. In December 2005, the department voted in a new set of requirements; students in the classes of 2008 and 2009 may choose either the old or the new requirements. Students in the class of 2010 and after must complete the new ones.

Old Requirements:1. 199;2. Two courses concentrating on literature written

before 1832;3. Semester courses on two of three major figures:

Chaucer (250), Shakespeare (256 or 257), and Milton (260);

4. A seminar;5. Six additional courses.

New Requirements:1. Two of the following: 199, 200, 201, or 231;2. Two courses concentrating on literature written

before 1832;3. Semester courses on two of three major figures:

Chaucer (250), Shakespeare (256 or 257), and Milton (260);

4. A seminar;5. Five additional courses

In 2007–08 the following courses fulfill the second requirement listed above: 200, 202, 203, 211, 231, 238, 250, 255, 256, 257, 259, 260, 263, 270, 353, and 362.

No course may be used to fulfill more than one require-ment. Up to two courses in film, a foreign or comparative literature, or dramatic literature offered through the theater department may count toward the major. Up to three advanced writing courses may count toward the major. Only one colloquium (120) may count toward

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207English Language and Literature

the major. English 118 does not count. No course counting toward the major may be taken for an S/U grade. We strongly recommend that all students take at least one historical survey sequence: English 200, 201; English 202, 203; or English 231, 233. We recommend that students interested in graduate school in English literature or in high school English teaching take both the British (200, 201) and the American (231, 233) surveys. Those considering graduate school should be aware that most doctoral programs in English require a reading knowledge of two foreign languages, and that preparation in literary theory will be extremely useful.

The MinorThe minor in English consists of six courses: English 199; a two-semester survey (ENG 200, 201 ENG 202, 203 or ENG 231, 233); plus three additional English courses chosen in consultation with the minor adviser, two of which must be above the 100 level.

HonorsDirector: Ambreen Hai (2007–08)

430d Thesis8 creditsFull-year course; Offered each year

Applicants to honors (which is done in addition to the requirements of the major) must have an average of B+ or above in the courses they count toward the ma-jor, and an average of B or above in all other courses. During the senior year they will present a thesis, of which the first complete formal draft will be due on the first day of the second semester. After the readers of the thesis have provided students with their evaluations of this draft, the student will have time to revise her work in response to their suggestions. The final completed version of the thesis will be due after spring vacation, to be followed during April by the student’s oral presenta-tion and discussion of her work. Students in honors will normally be given priority in seminars. In exceptional circ*mstances the department will permit a student to submit a work of fiction, poetry or creative nonfiction for honors.

Graduate580 Graduate Special StudiesIndependent study for graduate students. Admission by permission of the chair.4 creditsOffered both semesters each year

580d Graduate Special Studies8 creditsFull-year course; Offered each year

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Environmental Science and PolicyVisiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term.

Director**1 L. David Smith, Associate Professor of Biological Sciences

Program CoordinatorJoanne Benkley

Spatial Analysis Lab CoordinatorJon Caris

AdvisersElliot Fratkin, Professor of AnthropologyVirginia Hayssen, Professor of Biological Sciences

Paulette Peckol, Professor of Biological SciencesShizuka Hsieh, Assistant Professor of ChemistryAndrew J. Guswa, Associate Professor of EngineeringRobert M. Newton, Professor of GeologyAmy Larson Rhodes, Associate Professor of GeologyDonald C. Baumer, Professor of Government*1 Gregory White, Professor of GovernmentDavid Newbury, Professor of History and of African Studies**1 Jeffry Ramsey, Associate Professor of Philosophy**2 Leslie King, Associate Professor of Sociology

The environmental science and policy (ES&P) minor is designed for students with a serious interest in en-vironmental issues and sustainability and a commit-ment to scientifically based problem solving and policy analysis. The minor consists of six courses chosen with the guidance and approval of an ES&P minor adviser. Interested students are urged to meet with the direc-tor, coordinator and/or an ES&P adviser early in their academic planning.

Requirements: Six courses including one course from each of the following groups: chemistry, ecology, geol-ogy, and environmental policy, plus an elective in consultation with the minor adviser. The senior semi-nar, EVS 300, or the special studies, EVS 400 (4-credit option), is also required. A course in statistics (e.g. MTH 245 or the equivalent) and Geographic Information Systems (e.g., EVS/GEO 150) are recommended. Ap-propriate Smith courses not listed below, Five College courses, or courses taken at other institutions and through summer and/or semester-away programs may be counted toward the minor with preapproval of the adviser. Students must satisfy the prerequisites for all courses included in their minor program. No more than three of the six courses may be taken at other institutions.

EVS 150/GEO 150 Modeling our World: An Introduction to Geographic Information SystemsA geographic information system (GIS) manages loca-tion-based (spatial) information and provides the tools to display and analyze it. GIS provides the capabilities to link databases and maps and to overlay, query and visualize those databases in order to analyze and solve problems in many diverse fields. This course provides an introduction to the fundamental elements of GIS and connects course activities to GIS applications in landscape architecture, urban and regional planning, archeology, flood management, sociology, coastal stud-ies, environmental health, oceanography, economics, disaster management, cultural anthropology and art history. Enrollment limited to 20. {N} 4 creditsRobert BurgerOffered Spring 2009

EVS 300 Seminar in Environmental Science and PolicyCurrent patterns of human resource consumption and waste generation are not ecologically sustainable. Effective solutions require a working knowledge of the scientific, social, political and economic factors surrounding environmental problems. This seminar examines the impact of human activities on natural systems; the historical development of environmental problems; the interplay of environmental science,

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education and policy; and efforts to build a sustainable society. Discussions will center on conflicting views of historical changes, ecological design and sustainability, biodiversity, environmental policy, media coverage of environmental issues, ecological economics, and environmental justice. An extended project will involve active investigation, analysis and presentation of an environmental issue of local or regional importance with the explicit goal of identifying sustainable alterna-tives. Prerequisite: all courses completed or concurrent for the environmental science and policy minor or by permission of the instructor. {S/N} 4 creditsPaulette Peckol and Greg WhiteOffered Spring 2008

EVS 400 Special Studies1–4 creditsOffered both semesters each year

FYS 147 Science and Politics of Food, Water and EnergyA bottle of water sits on the shelf at the supermarket. Looking at this bottle, a geologist might wonder about the underground aquifer where the water originated. A chemist might muse on its chemical composition or the process through which petroleum products were turned into the plastic used to make the bottle. And a sociologist might ask who benefits from the sale of a “product” that was formerly a public good. This inter-disciplinary course will examine environmental issues from the diverse disciplinary perspectives. Through scholarly articles, field trips, guest lectures, films and “real-world” exercises, we will explore how disciplinary lenses frame the way economists, geologists, historians, biologists, chemists, engineers and others think about food, water and energy. Enrollment limited to 18 stu-dents. (E) (WI) 4 creditsLeslie King and Paul WetzelOffered Fall 2007

SOC 332 Seminar in Environmental SociologyThis class will explore the relationship between people and their natural environments. Using sociological theories, we will examine how environmental issues are constructed and how they are contested. In examining a series of particular environmental problems, we will consider how social, political and economic structures are related to environmental degradation. {S} 4 creditsLeslie KingOffered Spring 2008

ChemistryCHM 108 Environmental ChemistryGEO 301 Aqueous GeochemistryEGR 260 Mass and Energy BalancesEGR 312 Thermochemical Processes in the Atmosphere

EcologyBIO 110 Introductory Colloquia: Life Sciences for the 21st Century—Conservation Biology BIO 154 Biodiversity, Ecology and ConservationBIO 266 Principles of EcologyBIO 268 Marine Ecology and labBIO 364 Plant Ecology and labBIO 390 Topics in Environmental Biology: Coral Reefs—Past, Present and Future

GeologyGEO 104 Global Climate Change: Exploring the Past, the Present, and Options for the FutureGEO 105 Natural Disasters: Confronting and CopingGEO 108 Oceanography: An Introduction to the Marine EnvironmentGEO 109 The EnvironmentGEO 111 Introduction to Earth Processes and HistoryGEO 301 Aqueous Geochemistry*GEO 309 Groundwater GeologyGEO 311 Environmental GeophysicsEGR 315 Ecohydrology

Environmental PolicyANT 230 Africa: Population, Health, and Environmental IssuesANT 236 Economy, Ecology, and SocietyANT 241 Anthropology of DevelopmentECO 224 Environmental EconomicsGOV 254 Politics of the Global EnvironmentGOV 306 Politics and the EnvironmentPPL 222 Colloquium: U.S. Environmental History and PolicySOC 332 Seminar in Environmental Sociology

ElectivesElective courses can be chosen from courses listed for the environmental science and policy minor, and out-side the minor with consultation and approval of the minor adviser. Examples are:

Environmental Science and Policy

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210 Environmental Science and Policy

BIO 103 Economic Botany: Plants and Human AffairsBIO 110 Introductory Colloquia: Bacteria—

The Good, The Bad, and the Absolutely NecessaryBIO 110 Introductory Colloquia: Island BiologyBIO 110 Introductory Colloquia: Pests,

Plagues and Profligates—The Biology of InvasionsBIO 260 Invertebrate Diversity and labBIO 264 Plant Systemics and labBIO 272 Vertebrate BiologyBIO 366 BiogeographyECO 343 Seminar: The Economics of Global

Climate ChangeEGR 330 Engineering and Global DevelopmentEGR 346 Hydrosystems EngineeringEGR 390 Seminar: Advanced Topics in Engineering: Science, Technology

and EthicsEVS 150/GEO 150 Modeling our World: An Introduction to Geographic Information SystemsFYS 147 The Science and Politics of Food,

Water, and EnergyGOV 207 Politics of Public PolicyHST 299 Ecology and History in AfricaPHI 238 Environmental EthicsPHY 100 Solar Energy and SustainabilityPPL 220 Public Policy AnalysisSOC 232 World PopulationSWG 230 Feminisms and the Fate of the

Environment

*GEO 301 Aqueous Geochemistry fulfills the require-ments in both chemistry and geology (one course cov-ers two requirements)

Off-Campus ProgramsStudents may elect to take two to three of their courses for the minor outside Smith College by participation in an environmentally oriented, off-campus program. Relevant Smith approved programs include, but are not limited to, Duke University’s Organization for Tropical Studies, The School for Field Studies, The School for International Training, SEA Semester and the Williams College-Mystic Seaport Program. Courses from other programs may also be eligible for credit with approval from the minor adviser.

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EthicsVisiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term.

AdvisersJohn M. Connolly, Professor of PhilosophyElizabeth V. Spelman, Professo